True Lies

True Lies

5.0 1
by George Shannon, John O'Brien
     
 

In this collection of "lies" from many nations, the challenge is to find the slippery truth. By reading with care and not jumping to conclusions, readers will delight in discovering how these characters lie while at the same time they tell the truth.

Overview

In this collection of "lies" from many nations, the challenge is to find the slippery truth. By reading with care and not jumping to conclusions, readers will delight in discovering how these characters lie while at the same time they tell the truth.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
These eighteen brief tales of trickery are rewritten fables and lore from around the world. They are meant to be challenges to one's thinking skills, but it is difficult to determine what age would be the audience. Some tales are quite obvious and others make little sense. Overall, they are unappealing, no matter what age they were intended for.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4These 18 stories tell "true lies" and encourage readers to seek the truth behind what seems to be fallacy. For example, in "The Donkey and the Carrots," a donkey tied to an eight-foot rope manages to devour carrots from a cart 30 feet away. How? Sources for the tales are cited and range from the folk literature of Nigeria, Finland, the Jews of Kurdistan, to the reigns of British kings. Youngsters will relish these challenges, and teachers will appreciate their value for developing critical skills. Those who like these selections will also enjoy Shannon's Still More Stories to Solve (Greenwillow, 1994) and its predecessors. Black-and-white cartoons add energy to the tellings, and each tale is interpreted by partial page or border art. For the most part, the art and text are well integrated, but in a few cases the intensity of the art is distracting. With True Lies, Shannon adds another thoughtfully selected and well-written folkloric-puzzle book to his body of work.Carolyn Noah, Central Mass. Regional Library System, Worcester, MA
Kirkus Reviews
Recognizing a half-truth is one of life's harder lessons, but Shannon (Still More Stories to Solve, 1994, etc.) makes a sport of it in this collection of 18 stories that challenge readers to discover what is true and what is fabricated. Whether it's the story of the brothers digging for treasure in the vineyard their late father bequeathed them (when the treasure is the vineyard itself), or the tale of the brother and sister who promised their mother they'd each eat only one of the cookies they were baking, but were still too full to eat dinner (because the cookies they'd devoured were as big as a cake), there is a host of amusing and tricky folktales, biblical stories, and fables to test anyone's truth-telling skills. The procession of black-and-white drawings maintains a justifiably high-spirited pace, and although the tales offer a varying degree of complexity, every one ends with "The Whole Truth," a section that reveals any deceptions or slippery omissions. A collection that confirms for children what they may have guessed already about life's many shades of gray.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688144838
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/01/1997
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
7.33(w) x 9.35(h) x 0.49(d)
Lexile:
660L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 Years

Meet the Author

George Shannon is a popular storyteller and former children's librarian whose many notable picture books include Tomorrow's Alphabet, Lizard's Guest, and White Is for Blueberry. Tippy-Toe Chick, Go!, illustrated by Laura Dronzek, was named a Charlotte Zolotow Award Honor Book. George Shannon lives on Bainbridge Island, Washington.

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