The True Order of Studies

The True Order of Studies

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by Thomas Hill
     
 

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The True Order of Studies, presents the views which the venerable ex-president of Harvard has given from time to time in lectures before various educational bodies. It is an eminently suggestive book, and even those who disagree with the author, will find in it enough to repay abundantly the time given for careful perusal. After an elaborate classificationSee more details below

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The True Order of Studies, presents the views which the venerable ex-president of Harvard has given from time to time in lectures before various educational bodies. It is an eminently suggestive book, and even those who disagree with the author, will find in it enough to repay abundantly the time given for careful perusal. After an elaborate classification entitled "The Hierarchy of the Sciences," the author gives us chapters upon each of the general subjects of study, with special reference to their presentation in the school, and in conclusion, a complete curriculum of studies covering the whole period of a child's education, from the age of five years, up to the time when he emerges from the present influence of the teacher, into complete independence of thought and action. The classification of the sciences is valuable, as grouping the different branches of study by nations expressed in terms readily comprehended by the average teacher; but it is not comparable with that of Spencer in logical accuracy, reach, or exhaustive analysis. In fact, its logical value is destroyed in the very outset by a fatal violation of the rule of exclusion. It is surprising that Dr. Hill should contrast the terms "unlimited will," and "infinite will" as specific differences in separating great departments of science. Also similarly the terms "limited" with "finite." Such classification will hardly displace that of Spencer or Comte. In methods of instruction, is repeated the common mistake of assuming that each child is to be a specialist in every branch of natural history, and that his entire education is to be obtained in the school-room. In the majority of cases, broad views of the generic divisions of a science will prove a more valuable acquisition than an infinite number of unclassified facts, however interesting; and the home, the streets, and the green fields, must continue to be, as they ever have been, the great school for the education of the senses. The teacher who follows implicitly the directions of the author, will be likely soon to abandon his profession, or to become a theorist upon methods of instruction. The curriculum, with which the book closes, bears evidence of judicious labor, and the whole volume abounds with valuable suggestions, which we heartily commend to the teacher whose practical judgment enables him to winnow the golden grain from its modicum of chaff.

-The International Review, Volume 3

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781500654870
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
07/26/2014
Pages:
164
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.35(d)

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CHAPTER III. MATHEMATICS. GEOMETRY. WE have endeavored, in the preceding chapter, to show, that all possible objects of human thought are comprised under one or another of these five heads: Mathematics, Physics, History, Psychology and Theology. In making these the objects of study, mathematics must precede physics, because conceptions of form, time and number must precede conceptions of material phenomena. For example, mechanics treats of motion, in straight or curved lines, of the parallelogram of forces, and direction of reflected and refracted motion, of the strength of materials as dependent on form, of the equilibrium of the arch ; and in these and other problems, demands a preliminary knowledge of geometry. Chemistry deals with definite proportions, atomic weights, permutations of combinations, multiples in series, and other matters, necessarily involving a preliminary knowledge of arithmetic. Botany and zoology in their morphology require geometry ; in their physiology, chemistry ; in both departments, mechanics. As mathematics thus necessarily precede physics, so physics must precede history. All that men do inthis world, must be done upon the materials set before us, and under the conditions imposed by physical laws. Our thoughts can find expression only through outward symbols, in things built or made, in imitative arts, or in language; which, when verbal, was all originally figurative, and when musical, is subject to laws of rhythm and elasticity. The history of human thought must also include, as one of its most important chapters, the history of the physical sciences, and thus demand some knowledge of those sciences. Moreover, Psychology can be advantageouslystudied, only by one acquainted to some extent with physiology, and with history. We know nothing...

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