Truffles: Ultimate Luxury, Everyday Pleasure

Truffles: Ultimate Luxury, Everyday Pleasure

by Rosario Safina, Judith Sutton
     
 

Bearing the rich musk and flavor of their underground origins, truffles have long reigned as one of the earth’s richest culinary treasures. Once a rare pleasure available to only a select few, now truffles are truly an affordable luxury everyone can experience. Both black and white truffles are enjoying a new popularity in the form of many practical,… See more details below

Overview

Bearing the rich musk and flavor of their underground origins, truffles have long reigned as one of the earth’s richest culinary treasures. Once a rare pleasure available to only a select few, now truffles are truly an affordable luxury everyone can experience. Both black and white truffles are enjoying a new popularity in the form of many practical, easy-to-obtain products: truffle butters, oils, cheeses, creams, purees, pastes, pastas, honey, and flour. With no sacrifice in taste, this new world of inexpensive yet heavenly products allows the home cook to spark even simple recipes with the same secret flavor punch professional chefs have been using for years. Truffles: Ultimate Luxury, Everyday Pleasure shows how simple it is to make truffles and truffle products a part of everyday cooking and dining, adding a touch of elegance to any meal.

With over 115 recipes, covering an incredible assortment of appetizers, soups, salads, entrees, and side dishes of all sorts, including snacks, Truffles reveals the immense versatility of this celebrated cousin of the humble mushroom. With signature dishes from such star establishments as Restaurant Daniel, Cafe Boulud, Tru, No. 9 Park, Fleurs de Lys, Spiaggia, Felidia, and others, Truffles offers the best in restaurant fare as well as the latest in at-home cuisine. Entertain lavishly with the deliciously elegant Wild Mushroom Bisque with White Truffle Oil, Scallop-Truffle Napoleons with Creamed Leeks, or Raviolo with White Truffles and Golden Butter. Or for more relaxed dining, experience classic comfort food raised to an exalted level with Baked Penne with Truffle Cheese or with Mashed Potatoes with Mascarpone and Truffle Puree. A whole host of well-loved dishes enjoy added elegance with a simple truffles touch: Truffled Osso Bucco, Winter Squash Soup with Black Truffle, or Omelet with Black Truffles.

Also included are practical tips on buying and storing truffles, including insights on different types and grades, cleaning and cutting them, as well as expert wine recommendations for each dish. With a fascinating look at the colorful history of truffles and with beautiful photographs designed to inspire every cook, Truffles will show you how to make one of the world’s most treasured delicacies an inspiring and delicious addition to your everyday culinary repertoire.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The intimidating truffle of restaurant cuisine gets the home treatment in the attractive guide to using a variety of truffle products as well as the fungus itself.  Safina, president of a company that imports truffles and other foods, and food writer Sutton cogently describe the history, cultivation, and types of truffles and truffle products before presenting over 100 recipes for soups, appetizers, entrees, etc.  The explanation of truffle types and guidelines on buying are extremely useful, especially for the more affordable products like truffle butter and cheese, which may be even less well known than the fungus.  The book lives up to its title, with some recipes slathering on the luxury in restaurant fashion.  But many are simple, delicious, and entirely doable in a home kitchen, even on a weeknight.  Despite Safina’s commercial connections, the book is free of advertising.  The one caveat is the steep price, not atypical of recent cookbooks.  There are few books available on this subject, but libraries that own The Joy of Truffles, and Foie Gras: Recipes for Divine Indulgence may still want to consider this. (Sutton has been LJ’s cookery columnist for many years. –Ed.) Devon Thomas, Hass MS&L, Ann Arbor, MI (Library Journal, February 2003)
Library Journal
The intimidating truffle of restaurant cuisine gets the home treatment in this attractive guide to using a variety of truffle products as well as the fungus itself. Safina, president of a company that imports truffles and other foods, and food writer Sutton cogently describe the history, cultivation, and types of truffles and truffle products before presenting over 100 recipes for soups, appetizers, entr es, etc. The explanation of truffle types and guidelines on buying are extremely useful, especially for the more affordable products like truffle butter and cheese, which may be even less well known than the fungus. The book lives up to its title, with some recipes slathering on the luxury in restaurant fashion. But many are simple, delicious, and entirely doable in a home kitchen, even on a weeknight. Despite Safina's commercial connections, the book is free of advertising. The one caveat is the steep price, not atypical of recent cookbooks. There are few books available on this subject, but libraries that own The Joy of Truffles or Katherine Alford's Caviar, Truffles, and Foie Gras: Recipes for Divine Indulgence may still want to consider this. [Sutton has been LJ's cookery columnist for many years.-Ed.]-Devon Thomas, Hass MS&L, Ann Arbor, MI Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471225089
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
11/01/2002
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
8.21(w) x 10.43(h) x 0.83(d)

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What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
The intimidating truffle of restaurant cuisine gets the home treatment in the attractive guide to using a variety of truffle products as well as the fungus itself.  Safina, president of a company that imports truffles and other foods, and food writer Sutton cogently describe the history, cultivation, and types of truffles and truffle products before presenting over 100 recipes for soups, appetizers, entrees, etc.  The explanation of truffle types and guidelines on buying are extremely useful, especially for the more affordable products like truffle butter and cheese, which may be even less well known than the fungus.  The book lives up to its title, with some recipes slathering on the luxury in restaurant fashion.  But many are simple, delicious, and entirely doable in a home kitchen, even on a weeknight.  Despite Safina’s commercial connections, the book is free of advertising.  The one caveat is the steep price, not atypical of recent cookbooks.  There are few books available on this subject, but libraries that own The Joy of Truffles, and Foie Gras: Recipes for Divine Indulgence may still want to consider this. (Sutton has been LJ’s cookery columnist for many years. –Ed.) Devon Thomas, Hass MS&L, Ann Arbor, MI (Library Journal, February 2003)

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