Trust: Reaching the 100 Million Missing Voters: and Other Selected Essays

Overview


Where are the 100 million people who failed to vote in 2000 and are unlikely to vote in 2004? Political analyst Farai Chideya looks beyond day-to-day political struggles to the heart of a nation at war with itself. The 2000 election highlighted the rift between liberal/conservative and "Red State"/ "Blue State." But that superficial crack in our society actually is evidence of much more serious, indeed foundational, damage in our society. The United States, Chideya argues, lacks the moral, legal, and ...
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Overview


Where are the 100 million people who failed to vote in 2000 and are unlikely to vote in 2004? Political analyst Farai Chideya looks beyond day-to-day political struggles to the heart of a nation at war with itself. The 2000 election highlighted the rift between liberal/conservative and "Red State"/ "Blue State." But that superficial crack in our society actually is evidence of much more serious, indeed foundational, damage in our society. The United States, Chideya argues, lacks the moral, legal, and psychological framework for debating complex issues in a pluralistic society. Instead we rely on an outdated idea of dichotomy, that each issue has two opposing sides instead of many interested parties. And in so doing, we have lost, in effect disenfranchised, half the country.
Chideya’s title essay compliments many other ones written in the course of covering campaigns and controversies. She skips the easy answer, showing how black/white thinking (a key element of the Bush Adminstration) restricts our moral and political responses. A real democracy will allow us to acknowledge the complexity of our own lives, as well as our political interests. As we do that, we will be able to craft a working vision of government and civic life.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781932360264
  • Publisher: Soft Skull Press, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/9/2004
  • Pages: 245
  • Product dimensions: 5.56 (w) x 7.98 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Meet the Author

Farai Chideya

Farai Chideya, author of Don't Believe the Hype: Fighting Cultural Misinformation About African Americans (Plume Penguin 1995), now in it's eigth printing, The Color of Our Future (William Morrow, 1999), named one of the best books for teens by the New York Public Library, and Trust: REaching the 100 Million Missing Voters (Soft Skull, 2004) has worked in print for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Time, Spin, Vibe, O, Mademoiselle, Essence, and more.

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Table of Contents

Voting as personal power (a pledge)
1 Trust 1
2 A brief history of voter turnout 7
3 The 2000 election 15
4 The red and the blue : a divided America 33
5 Pop and politics 47
6 The future of political parties 61
Selected essays
George W. Bush, one-term president 79
Dreaming a new America : peaceful regime change in 2004 83
Talkin' loud, saying nothing 87
Leave no flygirl behind 91
The young volunteer but don't vote 93
Redefining patriotism 95
On felons reclaiming the right to vote, Clinton speaks loudly but late 99
Bush 100 : grading on a curve 101
What about the kids? 103
Georgie, ya no blow up the world, nuh? 105
The schmoozing of church and state 107
Watergate.com 109
Can a video country grasp real violence? 115
Cowboys, caution, and courage 119
Fighting our fathers' wars 121
Working-class women as war heroes 125
More like The matrix every day 129
Operation FUBAR 131
American jihad 133
The age of uncertainty 135
Secrets and cries 141
The real drug litmus test 143
Casualties of the war on drugs 145
A selective war on drugs 147
Avoiding the rush to gloat 149
Pipe dreams and promises 151
The rap on censorship 155
The real rap controversy 157
An open letter to Michael Jackson 159
Bush, taxes, and the recession question 163
It's the economy, stupid 165
Follow the money and the documents 169
The revolution must be monetized 171
Dude, where's my tax cut? 173
You've got news! 177
The uncertainty principle of reporting 179
Reality bites 181
The new face of news 183
What value media and democracy? 185
When is a good liar better than a good reporter? 189
The New York Times' Much ado about the wrong thing 191
Internet kills the television blahs 193
Getting Ashcrofted 195
Virus problems on the net are SoBig 197
Taxi wars 201
The brothers Bush and Florida's "fairness" firefight 203
The thin white line 205
Cincinnati, race, and the rest of us 207
A silver lining to a whole lott of nonsense 209
Do segregationists have a heaven? 211
Integrity breeds dissent 213
AIDS in America and Africa 219
Free trade, free Cuba 221
The colonial filter 223
Raising the question of disarmament, again 225
Poor rich Africa 229
Fortress America 233
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