Trust: A Very Short Introduction

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Overview


Trust is indispensable, yet it can be dangerous. Without trusting others, we cannot function in society, or even stay alive for very long, but being overly-trustful can be a bad strategy too. Trust is pragmatic, but it also has a moral dimension: trustworthiness is a virtue, and well-placed trust benefits us all.

In this Very Short Introduction, Katherine Hawley explores the key ideas about trust and distrust. Considerings questions such as 'Why do we value trust?' and Why do ...

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Overview


Trust is indispensable, yet it can be dangerous. Without trusting others, we cannot function in society, or even stay alive for very long, but being overly-trustful can be a bad strategy too. Trust is pragmatic, but it also has a moral dimension: trustworthiness is a virtue, and well-placed trust benefits us all.

In this Very Short Introduction, Katherine Hawley explores the key ideas about trust and distrust. Considerings questions such as 'Why do we value trust?' and Why do we want to be trusted rather than distrusted?', Hawley raises issues about the importance of trust in both the personal and public spheres, including family and relationships as well as politics and society.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199697342
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 9/8/2012
  • Series: Very Short Introductions Series
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 803,427
  • Product dimensions: 4.40 (w) x 6.80 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Katherine Hawley is Professor of Philosophy at the University of St Andrews and Head of the School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studies. She is the author of How Things Persist (OUP, 2001) and co-editor of Philosophy of Science Today (with Peter Clark, OUP, 2003).

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Table of Contents

Prologue: Trust and distrust at the breakfast table
1. What are trust and distrust?
2. Why trust and trustworthiness matter
3. Evolving trust and cooperation
4. Take the money and run
5. Honesty and dishonesty
6. Knowledge and expertise
7. Trust on the internet
8. Institutions, conspiracies, and nations
Afterword: The importance of being trustworthy
References
Further reading

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 4, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Trust is one of those fundamental concepts that all of us take m

    Trust is one of those fundamental concepts that all of us take more or less for granted. It is essential glue that binds all functional relationships, and thanks to trust it is possible to live in incredibly complex societies with many oftentimes very competitive interests and yet be reasonably assured of one’s safety. However, once we start probing the nature of trust deeper, we realize how nuanced the notion of trust it really is. It involves much more than mare factual accuracy, knowledge, and it’s not restricted to individual human beings, but it has a much wider scope. 




    In “Trust: A Very Short Introduction” Katherine Hawley takes on a wide-ranging tour of trust, as it is best understood today. The book focuses on cultural, psychological, and philosophical questions that are relevant for the deeper understanding of this concept. The book is fairly detailed for such a short introduction, but it still manages to be accessible and informative for a wide range of readers. Hawley is an engaging and well-informed writer, and this book was definitely a pleasure to read. It is one of the better such book in this “Very Short Introduction” series. I would definitely recommend it to anyone who is interested in the topic of trust, as well as most other curious readers who want to broaden their intellectual horizons. 

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