Trust Me

Trust Me

5.0 1
by John Updike
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The theme of trust, betrayed or fulfilled, runs through this collection of short stories: Parents lead children into peril, husbands abandon wives, wives manipulate husbands, and time undermines all. Love pangs, a favorite subject of the author, take on a new urgency as earthquakes, illnesses, lost wallets, and deaths of distant friends besiege his aging heroes

…  See more details below

Overview

The theme of trust, betrayed or fulfilled, runs through this collection of short stories: Parents lead children into peril, husbands abandon wives, wives manipulate husbands, and time undermines all. Love pangs, a favorite subject of the author, take on a new urgency as earthquakes, illnesses, lost wallets, and deaths of distant friends besiege his aging heroes and heroines. One man loves his wife’s twin, and several men love the imagined bliss of their pasts; one woman takes an impotent lover, and another must administer her father’s death. Bourgeois comforts and youthful convictions are tenderly seen as certain to erode: “Man,” as one of these stories concludes, “was not meant to abide in paradise.”

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The plainest of objects and events bloom in these stories as if they had at last found their proper climate. . . . I find myself searching for language to describe the very palpable pleasure that comes with experiencing in a writer authority and also humor and elegance and honesty and generosity of spirit.”—Marilynne Robinson, The New York Times Book Review
 
“It is in his short stories that we find Updike’s most assured work. . . . And almost without fail they give pleasure, a quality not to be taken lightly.”—The Washington Post Book World
 
“Dazzling . . . We certainly can trust him—we are in very good hands.”—The New York Times

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
As the chronicler of a certain kind of upper middle-class, sophisticated culture, Updike has few peers. The 22 stories in his new collection cover familiar ground, but always with a resonance and relevance that deliver fresh shocks of recognition. In Updike's world, fractured marriages are a condition of modern life. Ex-mates, new mates or lovers multiply in complex arrangements, ``victims of middle aged recklessness.'' Adultery is not defended or explained; it is inevitable and routine. The children of these many-bedded partners pay the price for their parents' un- and re-coupling. A tone of nostalgia, loss and pain is pervasive; retribution is sure to be exacted. As Updike ages, so do some of his characters, men who in their 50s or 60s, who, like the protagonists of The Wallet and Death of Distant Friends contemplate ``the premonition of extinction.'' In all of the narratives, Updike's inspired gift for imagery is employed to stunning effect. One responds to these stories with a visceral feeling of empathy, of having been exposed to the essence of life seen through a master's eye. 50.000 first printing; Literary Guild dual main selection. (May)
Library Journal
A few stories here come from magazines not found in most public libraries. Most treat familiar Updike themes (marriage, adultery, and divorce; the onset of middle age or old age; sickness and death) with familiar Updike techniques (role reversal, mirror scenes and characters, extended similes, traditional symbolism). Also familiar is the mostly high quality, even of newer material, such as an unobtrusive experiment in first-person plural narration in ``Leaf Season,'' the relation between sex and sleep (explored more thoroughly in ``Pygmalion'' than in ``Killing'' or ``Slippage''), and the use of the ``f''-word in a New Yorker (!) story, ``Unstuck.'' The two failures, ``Still Some Use'' and ``Poker Night,'' are done in by bathetic imagery. More disturbing is a tendency to draw the moral, as if Updike shared with the artist of ``Learn a Trade'' a lack of trust in his own work. Let's hope not. Literary Guild dual main selection. Hugh M. Crane, Cambridge P.L., Mass.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780449912171
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/28/1996
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
249,419
Product dimensions:
5.48(w) x 8.19(h) x 0.70(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

“The plainest of objects and events bloom in these stories as if they had at last found their proper climate. . . . I find myself searching for language to describe the very palpable pleasure that comes with experiencing in a writer authority and also humor and elegance and honesty and generosity of spirit.”—Marilynne Robinson, The New York Times Book Review
 
“It is in his short stories that we find Updike’s most assured work. . . . And almost without fail they give pleasure, a quality not to be taken lightly.”—The Washington Post Book World
 
“Dazzling . . . We certainly can trust him—we are in very good hands.”—The New York Times

Meet the Author

John Updike was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania, in 1932. He graduated from Harvard College in 1954 and spent a year in Oxford, England, at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. From 1955 to 1957 he was a member of the staff of The New Yorker. His novels have won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Rosenthal Foundation Award, and the William Dean Howells Medal. In 2007 he received the Gold Medal for Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. John Updike died in January 2009.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
March 18, 1932
Date of Death:
January 27, 2009
Place of Birth:
Shillington, Pennsylvania
Place of Death:
Beverly Farms, MA
Education:
A.B. in English, Harvard University, 1954; also studied at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art in Oxford, England

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >