The Truth About Confident Presenting

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Overview


About the Author:
James O'Rourke is Professor of Management at the University of Notre Dame

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132102827
  • Publisher: FT Press
  • Publication date: 5/27/2010
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

James S. O’Rourke, IV teaches management and corporate communication at the University of Notre Dame, where he is a Concurrent Professor of Management and the Arthur F. and Mary J. O’Neil Director of the Eugene D. Fanning Center for Business Communication. In a career spanning four decades, he has earned an international reputation in business and corporate communication. Business Week magazine has named him one of the “outstanding faculty” in Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business.

In 2004, he was named as recipient of the Fifth Annual John A. Kaneb Teaching Award in the Mendoza College of Business and was recognized during the University’s 159th Commencement exercises.

His publications include Management Communication: A Case Analysis Approach (3rd edition, Prentice-Hall, 2007), and Business Communication: A Framework for Success (Thomson Learning, 2001). Professor O’Rourke is senior editor of an eight-book series on Managerial Communication from Thomson Learning and is principal author or directing editor of more than 130 management and corporate communication case studies.

Professor O’Rourke is a graduate of Notre Dame with advanced degrees from Temple University, the University of New Mexico, and a doctorate in Communication from the S. I. Newhouse School of Syracuse University. He has held faculty appointments in such schools as the United States Air Force Academy, the Defense Information School, the United States Air War College, and the Communications Institute of Ireland. He was a Gannett Foundation Teaching Fellow at Indiana University in the 1980s, and a graduate student in language and history at Christ’s College, Cambridge University in England during the 1970s. He has delivered invited lectures at leading universities in Denmark, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, and Singapore.

Professor O’Rourke is a trustee of both The Arthur W. Page Society and the Institute for Public Relations. He is a member of the Reputation Institute and the Management Communication Association. He is also a regular consultant to Fortune 500 and mid-size businesses throughout North America. Dr. O’Rourke and his wife, Pam, have three daughters: Colleen (St. Mary’s College, 1994), Molly (Notre Dame, 2000), and Kathleen (Notre Dame, 2007).

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Read an Excerpt

Introduction

Harvard Business School professor John Kotter studied a number of successful general managers over a five-year period and found that they spend most of their time with other people, including subordinates, their bosses, and numerous people from outside the organization. His study found that the average manager spends just 25 percent of his time working alone. Most of that time with others, Kotter found, was spent talking and listening—and a sizable fraction was spent presenting ideas and actions to others.

Similarly, management consultant Dierdre Borden found that successful managers spend about 75 percent of their time in verbal interaction with others: on the telephone, face-to-face, in meetings, and in presentations to large and small groups. The fact is, most information in contemporary business and social settings is passed orally, and our most important ideas are frequently formalized in presentations to clients, customers, shareholders, superiors, and key decision makers.

You can't avoid it. At some point soon in your career, you're going to be asked to give a presentation. The problem is that most people are genuinely apprehensive about doing that. We can compose a memo, letter, report, or e-mail in the quiet and comfort of our home or office, but standing in front of a group to offer our thoughts—or to motivate them to action—is simply frightening to many people. Like it or not, during a presentation you're being evaluated by everyone in the audience. You're being sized up, critiqued, and assessed. For those 15 or 20 minutes, your value to the organization, your career...your future are on the line. No wonder people get nervous.

I've been teaching public speaking to business school students, government and military officials, and professionals in all lines of work for more than 35 years, and I've learned one simple truth about public speaking: It's not easy, but it's certainly doable. I've helped people overcome fears, anxieties, and apprehensions of all sorts and watched them go on to wow an audience with their presentation skills. If they can do it, so can you.

This book, simple and compact as it is, can do three things for you. First, it can help you to diagnose your current speaking abilities It can help you size up your skill levels and get some sense of whether you're "ready for prime time." Second, it shows you the standards of the North American marketplace. Point-by-point, you find the expectations of the business and professional world. Finally, this book gives you the toolkit you need to prepare, improve, and present. It's all here, neatly tucked into 51 Truths.

The most important truth to be learned, however, is this: Great presenters weren't born that way. They became great by focusing on their message, the needs of the audience, the pattern of organization, and the details of presenting. Persistence, dedication, and a little practice can go a long way toward making you a top-notch public speaker. The details are straight ahead.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

Introduction     vii
Some Initial Truths
Public speaking is not easy, but it's certainly doable     1
The key to success is preparation     5
Rehearsal is essential     9
Emulating good speakers makes you better     13
Establish goals for your presentation     17
A presentation is a learning occasion     21
The Truth About Getting Ready to Speak
Talk is the work     25
Know what your audience is looking for     29
There is a difference between speaking and writing     33
Preparing a presentation is a relatively simple process     37
Begin by analyzing your audience     41
Know your audience     45
The Truth About What Makes People Listen
Understand what makes people listen     49
Your speaking style makes a difference     53
Anticipate the questions your audience brings to your presentation     57
Listening matters     61
Being an active listener brings real benefits     65
You can overcome the barriers to successful communication     69
The Truth About Developing Support for Your Presentation
Develop support for your presentation     73
Understand the power of your content     77
The kinds and qualityof evidence matter to your audience     81
Structure can help carry an inexperienced speaker     85
Find support for your presentation     89
Use the Internet to support your presentation     93
The Truth About Getting Up to Speak
Select a delivery approach     97
Your introduction forms their first impression     101
Begin with a purpose in mind     105
Keep your audience interested     109
Conclusions are as important as introductions     113
Have confidence in your preparation     117
Repeat the process as often as possible     121
The Truth About Managing Anxiety
All speakers get nervous     125
Recognize anxiety before it begins     129
Deal with nervous behaviors     133
Keep your nervousness to yourself     137
The Truth About Nonverbal Communication
Most information is transferred nonverbally     141
The nonverbal process can work for you     145
Nonverbal communication has specific functions     149
Nonverbal communication is governed by key principles     153
Nonverbal communication has an effect on your audience     157
The Truth About Visual Aids
Visual aids can help your audience understand your message      161
Understand visual images before you use them     165
Choose the right visual     169
Use PowerPoint effectively     173
Consider speaking without visuals     177
The Truth About Handling an Audience
Assess the mood of your audience     181
Answer the audience's questions     185
Handle hostility with confidence     189
The Truth About What Makes a Presentation Work
Know as much as possible about the location     193
Use the microphone to your advantage     197
Know your limits     201
References     205
Acknowledgments     207
About the Author     209
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Preface

Harvard Business School professor John Kotter studied a number of successful general managers over a five-year period and found that they spend most of their time with other people, including subordinates, their bosses, and numerous people from outside the organization. His study found that the average manager spends just 25 percent of his time working alone. Most of that time with others, Kotter found, was spent talking and listening—and a sizable fraction was spent presenting ideas and actions to others.

Similarly, management consultant Dierdre Borden found that successful managers spend about 75 percent of their time in verbal interaction with others: on the telephone, face-to-face, in meetings, and in presentations to large and small groups. The fact is, most information in contemporary business and social settings is passed orally, and our most important ideas are frequently formalized in presentations to clients, customers, shareholders, superiors, and key decision makers.

You can't avoid it. At some point soon in your career, you're going to be asked to give a presentation. The problem is that most people are genuinely apprehensive about doing that. We can compose a memo, letter, report, or e-mail in the quiet and comfort of our home or office, but standing in front of a group to offer our thoughts—or to motivate them to action—is simply frightening to many people. Like it or not, during a presentation you're being evaluated by everyone in the audience. You're being sized up, critiqued, and assessed. For those 15 or 20 minutes, your value to the organization, your career...your future are on the line. No wonder people get nervous.

I've been teaching public speaking to business school students, government and military officials, and professionals in all lines of work for more than 35 years, and I've learned one simple truth about public speaking: It's not easy, but it's certainly doable. I've helped people overcome fears, anxieties, and apprehensions of all sorts and watched them go on to wow an audience with their presentation skills. If they can do it, so can you.

This book, simple and compact as it is, can do three things for you. First, it can help you to diagnose your current speaking abilities It can help you size up your skill levels and get some sense of whether you're "ready for prime time." Second, it shows you the standards of the North American marketplace. Point-by-point, you find the expectations of the business and professional world. Finally, this book gives you the toolkit you need to prepare, improve, and present. It's all here, neatly tucked into 51 Truths.

The most important truth to be learned, however, is this: Great presenters weren't born that way. They became great by focusing on their message, the needs of the audience, the pattern of organization, and the details of presenting. Persistence, dedication, and a little practice can go a long way toward making you a top-notch public speaker. The details are straight ahead.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

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