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Truth & Dare: 20 Tales of Heartbreak and Happiness
     

Truth & Dare: 20 Tales of Heartbreak and Happiness

3.0 1
by Liz Miles (Editor)
 

Truth & Dare is a collection of short stories confirming the truth we all know— high school is painful—and written for those who dare to be different. These edgy short stories are told from the point of view of the quirky, cool, but not necessarily popular teens, who are dealing with all the pressures of growing up—school, friends, music,

Overview

Truth & Dare is a collection of short stories confirming the truth we all know— high school is painful—and written for those who dare to be different. These edgy short stories are told from the point of view of the quirky, cool, but not necessarily popular teens, who are dealing with all the pressures of growing up—school, friends, music, relationships, parents, and just plain fitting in.

This collection features some of the hottest writers in the teen genre, including: Jennifer Boylan, Sarah Rees Brennan, Cecil Castellucci, Emma Donoghue, Courtney Gillette, A.M. Homes, Jennifer Hubbard, Heidi R. Kling, Jennifer Knight, Michael Lowenthal, Liz Miles, Saundra Mitchell, Luisa Plaja, Matthue Roth, Sherry Shahan, Gary Soto, Shelley Stoehr, Sara Wilkinson, Ellen Wittlinger, and Jill Wolfson.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Kirkus, 4/1/11
Very positive. With remarkably few exceptions, the short stories in this collection exemplify the best of the form, drawing readers immediately into the lives of characters who confront the hard truths of alienation, love, trauma and sex.
Children's Literature - Patrice Belotte
In her introduction, Miles considers whether or not her collection of stories needs a disclaimer. She considers a warning label, much like those utilized for television shows that contain content that may inappropriate for viewers of a certain age. She also considers a rating system, perhaps along the same lines as those used for movies. However, she digresses and reasons that the title is warning enough. This collection of stories about teenage subjects such as love, heartbreak, embarrassing moments, sexual discovery, humor, and relationships is about on par with a game of truth or dare that might be played amongst the original cast of 90210. Racy and surprising, each tale has an unsettling undercurrent of what most adults try to forget about teenage life. However, that is the point that Miles is trying to make. After finishing stories composed by Gary Soto, Michael Lowenthal, Jill Wolfson, and others, the reader should feel unsettled and slightly disturbed. In the opening story of the collection, "Girl Jesus on the Inbound Subway," Matthue Roth moves through a modern narration of a boy who falls instantly in love with a dangerous and mysterious girl. His feelings are left hanging in midair when the girl suddenly challenges society by stealing from those who have very little, to survive. The collection that follows resonates the same feeling of uncertainty, curiosity, and awkwardness. Reviewer: Patrice Belotte
School Library Journal
Gr 10 Up—Like the game for which this anthology is named, these stories are exciting, a little risky, racy, and very revealing. Miles has assembled a collection by well-known names in teen fiction, such as Cecil Castellucci, Ellen Wittlinger, and Gary Soto, as well as some voices new to the field. Most selections contain some element of romance or attraction. In Sarah Rees Brennan's "The Young Stalker's Handbook," a teen follows a cute boy around a mall until she is forced to speak to him after an embarrassing event. Sara Wilkinson's "Pencils" is an odd story in which a young man finds the sight of his seven perfectly sharpened pencils just as compelling as the large (possibly uneven) breasts of his tormentor. Some selections are simply about the choices people make, such as Shelley Stoehr's "Somebody's Daughter," in which the actions of three friends at a party have disastrous consequences for one of the girls. Among the most creative of the stories is Emma Donoghue's "Team Men," a reimagining of the biblical story of David and Jonathan set against the backdrop of boys' soccer. But the most compelling stories are the ones in which the narrator questions what he or she knows, such A. M. Homes's "Yours Truly," in which a young woman feverishly writes words of self-examination in a linen closet, or Courtney Gillette's "Never Have I Ever," in which a teenage girl must choose between her beloved boyfriend or the girls to whom she's always been attracted. The tales range from humorous to heartbreaking to ridiculous to empowering, and most readers will be able to find at least one story that speaks specifically to them.—Heather M. Campbell, formerly at Philip S. Miller Library, Castle Rock, CO
Kirkus Reviews
Truth-telling can be dangerous, as anyone knows who's traveled the angst-filled terrain of adolescence. With remarkably few exceptions, the short stories in this collection exemplify the best of the form, drawing readers immediately into the lives of characters who confront the hard truths of alienation, love, trauma and sex. Some are humorous, like Sarah Rees Brennan's "The Young Stalker's Handbook," about two girls' comical encounter with a good-looking boy in a fast-food restaurant, and the editor's own contribution, "Scrambled Eggs," told entirely in Tweets. Others are unsettling, like Sherry Shahan's "Iris and Jim," a vividly weird story of love between two anorexics, or Matthue Roth's lush and startling "Girl Jesus on the Inbound Subway," about a Russian-American boy in Philadelphia who follows a girl from the train. Saundra Mitchell's "The Last Will and Testament of Evan Todd" is the powerful story of a boy reclaiming his life after an icy drowning. A girl auditioning for school play finds success where she least expects it in Heidi R. Kling's "Headgear Girl," while Emma Donoghue's "Team Men" gives the Biblical story of David and Jonathan a modern twist as two soccer players explore their homosexuality. Fans of Ellen Wittlinger and Gary Soto will be pleased to find them included in this edgy anthology for teens who dare to face the sometimes-ugly truths of life. (Short stories. 12 & up)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780762441044
Publisher:
Running Press Book Publishers
Publication date:
04/26/2011
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
5.35(w) x 7.98(h) x 0.98(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Liz Miles is a freelance editor with many years of experience and the author of a number of books for younger readers. She co-founded and is joint director of Wordstone Publishing. She lives in Wivenhoe, England.

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Truth & Dare: 20 Tales of Heartbreak and Happiness 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
BooksWithBite More than 1 year ago
One thing I enjoyed about this book is the variety in it. There is all sorts of love and heart ache in it. Lots of strong characters becoming weak. And weak characters becoming strong. Some stories made me angry while others made me happy. I loved the writing flow of the stories. I also wondered if some of the stories in the book would make it into full books. I would love to see more of how the characters progressed. One thing I didn't really like is that there are some stories that are really graphic. I would recommend this book for 18+. Overall, it's a great book with loads of new authors I have not heard of. I look forward to reading more of the new authors work as they have caught my eye!