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Truth Decay
     

Truth Decay

4.6 3
by Douglas Groothuis
 

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A 2001 Christianity Today Award of Merit winner!

The concept of truth as absolute, objective and universal has undergone serious deterioration in recent years. No longer is it a goal for all to pursue. Rather postmodernism sees truth as inseparable from culture, psychology, race and gender. Ultimately, truth is what we make it to be.

What factors have

Overview

A 2001 Christianity Today Award of Merit winner!

The concept of truth as absolute, objective and universal has undergone serious deterioration in recent years. No longer is it a goal for all to pursue. Rather postmodernism sees truth as inseparable from culture, psychology, race and gender. Ultimately, truth is what we make it to be.

What factors have accelarated this decay of truth? Why are people willing to embrace such a devalued concept? How does this new view compare and contrast with a Christian understanding?

While postmodernism contains some truthful insights (despite its attempt to dethrone truth), Douglas Groothuis sees its basic tenets as intellectually flawed and hostile to Christian views. In this spirited presentation of a solid, biblical and logical perspective, Groothuis unveils how truth has come under attack and how it can be defended in the vital areas of theology, apologetics, ethics and the arts.

Editorial Reviews

Stephen Scheperle
"Truth Decay explains how God's truth ignites our passion for Him in a world gone numb with endless distractions, infuses our lives with objective meaning in a chaotic and pointless culture, and benefits His people together in community. As such, Groothius' work will help pastors who are seeking to deliver God's truth in culturally relevant ways."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780830822287
Publisher:
InterVarsity Press
Publication date:
05/01/2000
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
294,554
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.68(d)

Meet the Author

Douglas R. Groothuis (PhD, Philosophy, University of Oregon) is professor of philosophy at Denver Seminary in Denver, Colorado. He has also been a visiting professor or adjunct faculty member at Fuller Theological Seminary (Colorado Springs extension), Metropolitan State College of Denver, Westminster Theological Seminary (California campus), University of Oregon, New College Berkeley and Seattle Pacific University.

His articles have been published in professional journals such as Religious Studies, Sophia, Theory and Research in Education, Philosophia Christi, Themelios, Think: A Journal of the Royal Institute of Philosophy, Christian Scholar's Review, Inquiry and Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society. He has written several books, including Truth Decay, In Defense of Natural Theology (coeditor), Unmasking the New Age, Jesus in an Age of Controversy, Deceived by the Light, The Soul in Cyberspace, and, in the Wadsworth Philosophers Series, On Pascal and On Jesus.

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Truth Decay 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you think that truth is important and desire to know how it is thought about in today's culture, read this book. If you think that truth is not important, read this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Very well written engaging and enlightening.
Guest More than 1 year ago
(I gave myself four stars because I had to fill out that part in order to write anything else!) This book assesses the core claims of postmodernism with respect to its ideas of truth. Truth is 'decaying' in that people take truth to mean what is socially, culturally, and individually constructed as opposed to what is factually the case. I defend the classical correspondence view of truth--a statement is true only if it matches up with what it refers to--and develop the biblical view of truth as objective, absolute, universal, etc. Along the way I critique postmodernist views on ethics, art, theology, and so on. I am quite concerned to challenge Christian writers who appropriate postmodernist ideas uncritically. The book is closer to 300 pages long than the length given on this page. It includes an index and is heavily footnoted.