Try Me One More Time

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
Absent from recording since 1990, roots music avatar David Bromberg makes a most welcome return with this collection of vintage folk and blues tunes (plus his own durable title song to spice up the mix), rendered with only his well-seasoned voice and deft, soulful guitar. As per the latter, the masterful Bromberg is in championship form, executing moaning, angular Delta blues lines and jaunty country-folk fingerpicking attacks with equal aplomb. Time has been a benefactor to Bromberg the vocalist, as his once-nasal whine has evolved into a rich, expressive baritone that he employs with an infallible feel for the moment and for the heart. He rages through Tommy Johnson's ...
See more details below
CD
$16.55
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$17.99 List Price
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (5) from $5.20   
  • New (3) from $13.48   
  • Used (2) from $5.20   

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
Absent from recording since 1990, roots music avatar David Bromberg makes a most welcome return with this collection of vintage folk and blues tunes (plus his own durable title song to spice up the mix), rendered with only his well-seasoned voice and deft, soulful guitar. As per the latter, the masterful Bromberg is in championship form, executing moaning, angular Delta blues lines and jaunty country-folk fingerpicking attacks with equal aplomb. Time has been a benefactor to Bromberg the vocalist, as his once-nasal whine has evolved into a rich, expressive baritone that he employs with an infallible feel for the moment and for the heart. He rages through Tommy Johnson's epic "Big Road," goosing it along with an infectious strolling bass line; strips down to a haunting quiet with Lonnie Johnson-style single-string narration in the foreboding "Levee Camp Moan"; and is positively jubilant in his jaunty fingerpicking of Sam and Kirk McGee's buoyant "Buck Dancer's Choice." Evidence of Bromberg's authoritative interpretive singing is all over the place, but most effectively on the haunting "Lonesome Roving Wolves," an a cappella account of the early Mormons' bloody journey westward. Bromberg used to perform with a big folk band (decades ahead of Bruce Springsteen's assembling of a similar configuration for his Seeger Sessions album and tour), but here, less is more. Try Me One More Time delivers its wit, its wisdom, and its soul undiluted, the artist's voice and instrument alone bearing -- and baring -- unvarnished truths about the human condition.
All Music Guide - Jeff Tamarkin
Had David Bromberg been making new recordings all along, then Try Me One More Time would be a welcome addition to his catalog. An all-acoustic, solo set of blues and folk tunes -- one original, several traditional and the rest by established writers such as Bob Dylan, Rev. Gary Davis and Robert Johnson -- the album feels intimate, honest and earthy, and of course the guitar playing is never less than masterful. But Bromberg hadn't released a new album in a long 17 years when Try Me One More Time hit, and because of that it's an underwhelming return. There is no denying that Bromberg, who basically gave up the road and the studio at the dawn of the '90s in order to become a violin maker, possesses an innate love for the roots Americana that populates his comeback album. And on its own merits, it's a satisfying enough listen -- he sounds perfectly comfortable within the familiar domain of this material. But therein lies the disappointment: he's too comfortable. Bromberg's interpretations show little imagination or ingenuity, and after such a lengthy sabbatical, fans would be right to expect something that displays growth and movement in an artist. Try Me One More Time doesn't. Bromberg's Delta-style guitar work is, as always, note-perfect (the two instrumentals are a treat and his slide playing is sweet), but fans already know he can do that with his eyes closed. And while Bromberg, never much of a singer -- the voice is a bit more gravelly these days but otherwise unchanged -- is well-suited for the minimalist renditions of tracks like Dylan's "It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry," Elizabeth Cotten's "Shake Sugaree" and Davis' "Trying to Get Home," there are no real surprises in how he handles those chestnuts. It's not that anyone expected David Bromberg to come back and make a hip-hop record or something equally out of character, but while he undoubtedly enjoyed cutting these songs that have always been dear to his heart, there are few clues here as to what he's been up to for the nearly two decades he spent out of earshot.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/27/2007
  • Label: Appleseed Records
  • UPC: 611587109927
  • Catalog Number: 1099
  • Sales rank: 69,435

Album Credits

Performance Credits
David Bromberg Primary Artist, Acoustic Guitar, Vocals
Technical Credits
Tommy Johnson Composer
Blind Willie McTell Composer
Elizabeth Cotten Composer
David Bromberg Composer
Bob Dylan Composer, Author
David Glasser Mastering
Marc Moss Engineer
Nancy Josephson Producer, Audio Production, Cover Art
Traditional Composer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously