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Try Rebooting Yourself: A Dilbert Collection [NOOK Book]

Overview

It's an embarrassment of riches. I feel like an undertaker who just heard about a bus accident. It's tragic, but good for business.

Maybe, just maybe, the reason Scott Adams is able to so completely and utterly skewer the absurdities of the modern workplace is that deep down he really enjoyed his many years as a cubicle dweller. Perhaps his comic strip Dilbert is nothing more than a cleverly disguised love ...

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Try Rebooting Yourself: A Dilbert Collection

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Overview

It's an embarrassment of riches. I feel like an undertaker who just heard about a bus accident. It's tragic, but good for business.

Maybe, just maybe, the reason Scott Adams is able to so completely and utterly skewer the absurdities of the modern workplace is that deep down he really enjoyed his many years as a cubicle dweller. Perhaps his comic strip Dilbert is nothing more than a cleverly disguised love letter to corporate America.

And maybe, just maybe, monkeys will fly out of Donald Trump's butt.

In Try Rebooting Yourself, AMP's 28th Dilbert collection, the world's most dysfunctional office family is back and doing what it does best. Wally adroitly steers clear of new assignments--and perfects his work grimace. The Pointy-Haired Boss (PHB) thinks of new ways to demoralize and disenfranchise his employees. (As part of a new strategy to make the pension plan solvent, he reminds employees Smoking is cool.) Dogbert continues his lucrative consulting business. And Dilbert, alas, he soldiers and smolders on, searching for intelligent life in the corporate universe--and maybe, just maybe, a little action. (Fat chance.)

This time out, the gang is joined by a host of odd (but strangely familiar) guest characters including the clueless Hammerhead Bob, and Petricia, the PHB's fawning but ferocious sycophant. All office workers may now nod knowingly.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Day in, day out, Dilbert shows up at work, ever ready to reshuffle paperclips, reorganize email files, and, perhaps, just perhaps, find some intelligent life in the corporate universe. Try Rebooting Yourself, the 28th Dilbert collection, delivers cubicle-sized slices of wisdom about the way business really is. A pedagogic gift for PHBs (Pointy-Haired Bosses).
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781449417734
  • Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing LLC
  • Publication date: 7/26/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Sales rank: 629,291
  • File size: 21 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

What started as a doodle has turned Scott Adams into a superstar of the cartoon world. Dilbert debuted on the comics page in 1989, while Adams was in the tech department at Pacific Bell. Adams continued to work at Pacific Bell until he was voluntarily downsized in 1995. He has lived in the San Francisco Bay area since 1979.

Biography

Back when he was a lowly office worker slaving under fluorescent lights and drinking bad coffee at an unsatisfying string of office jobs, Scott Adams would try to stave off some of the mind-numbing boredom he faced each day by doodling a little comic strip about a hapless office drone he called Dilbert. As he worked, Adams filed away the fodder for his fledgling comic strip. Today, Dilbert is officially an empire -- and Adams is the CEO.

Adams didn't start his career path intending to become a workplace warrior. As he told FamousVeggie.com, he graduated high-school as valedictorian "because the other 39 people in my class couldn't spell ‘valedictorian.'" After earning a B.A. in economics at Hartwick College in Oneonta, New York, Adams went on to earn an M.B.A. at the University of California at Berkeley. Adding an interesting twist to his education, he also managed to pick up a Certified Hypnotist diploma from the Clement School of Hypnosis in 1981.

After college, during his often-brief tenure at a series of low-paying, low-on-the-totem-pole jobs at corporations from Crocker National Bank in San Francisco to Pacific Bell in San Ramon, Adams started to wonder if his sanity-saving doodles really could rescue him from a life spent working for The Man. Acting on a tip from a kindly fellow cartoonist, he picked up the 1988 Artist Markets guide and simply followed the instructions on how to get syndicated. He mailed out fifty sample Dilbert strips, and was offered a contract by United Media within weeks.

Adams's first attempt writing an actual book was 1996's The Dilbert Principle, which became a number one New York Times bestseller and one of the top-selling business books of all time. More than just a compilation of Adams's cartoons, the book included essays on the trials and tribulations of corporate culture. "Each one is on target and deliciously sardonic," said Booklist in its review. "Sometimes too true to be funny." Today, the strip continues its clip as the fastest-growing cartoon of all time, and is enjoyed daily by 150 million people in 1,900 newspapers, in 56 countries.

Transitioning from comic compilations to full books was a challenge for Adams. As he admitted to Salon.com, "Drawing the comic strip is fun -- it can actually increase my energy. I feel good when I'm doing it, and I feel good when it's done. But writing just sucks the energy right out of me. I find that after about an hour of writing sometimes I have to jump on the floor and fall asleep, right now. It's so much harder than it looks."

When he's not helping Dilbert bring a smile to the faces of the working wounded, Adams moonlights as a restaurateur, running two successful Stacey's Cafés in Northern California. He has also founded the Scott Adams Foods company, home of the Dilberito™ -- a protein-packed burrito perfect for the office microwave.

Good To Know

Adams describes himself as a "a cat-loving, vegetarian tennis player."

His past jobs include bank teller, computer programmer, financial analyst, product manager, loan officer, corporate strategist, and pseudo-engineer. Says Adams, "I was incompetent in each of those fields, but for some reason no one ever noticed."

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    1. Hometown:
      Danville, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 8, 1957
    2. Place of Birth:
      Catskill, New York
    1. Education:
      B.A., Hartwick College, 1979; M.B.A., University of California, Berkeley, 1986

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2007

    I think I worked there!

    Scott Adams is always spot-on about big-company life. Whenever I read Dilbert it feels like Adams was one cubicle over from me during my whole career. His characters are so well drawn (literally and figuratively) for the small space he has to convey what they're thinking and feeling. Dilbert never fails to make me laugh and put work in its proper perspective.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2013

    Why arent you actully writing a review,to the person below me?

    I mean,it doesnt make any sence!Why would you just type ^_^?You are a @#$#%&$ retard!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2012

    Good

    G t g

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 17, 2009

    Dilbert rocks

    I absolutely love all of the compilation books of Dilbert comics. He is hilarious and totally represents corporate usa. I would recommend it to anyone working in an office environment to get a great laugh and share with others

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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