Tuck-Me-In Tales

Tuck-Me-In Tales

by Margaret Read MacDonald, Yvonne Davis
     
 

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Around the world each night, parents tell stories to children as they put them to bed. Margaret Read MacDonald--a folklorist, storyteller, and children's librarian--uses bedtime tales in the daytime to end her story hours on a calm note. Here she includes six of her favorites from around the world. Dulcimer and autoharp by Richard Scholtz.  See more details below

Overview

Around the world each night, parents tell stories to children as they put them to bed. Margaret Read MacDonald--a folklorist, storyteller, and children's librarian--uses bedtime tales in the daytime to end her story hours on a calm note. Here she includes six of her favorites from around the world. Dulcimer and autoharp by Richard Scholtz.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Five lesser-known folktales are gloriously illustrated in this collection of stories intended to bring a gentle ending to a child's day. Included are Snow Bunting's "Lullaby from Siberia," "Chin Chin Kobokama" from Japan, "Kanji-jo, the Nestlings" from Liberia, "The Playground of the Sun and Moon" from Chile and Argentina, and "Counting Sheep" from the British Isles. Each is accompanied by lavish watercolors that provide a folks-y charm to the text. Following the tales are notes about the stories and their origins (if known) and related folktales for each one. Also included are suggestions for telling these stories in various group or individual settings, along with coordinating activities. Music is suggested for two of the tales, or tellers are encouraged to incorporate their own melodies. Perhaps a related activity for older children would be to read aloud each folktale and have listeners invent their own endings, either in writing or in drama. Another companion activity could be to find a similar folktale and provide a comparison of it with the one that Ms. MacDonald has presented, then discuss how and why they are different from popular American folktales. Whether this book is being read to someone or read individually, one's imagination is stirred, with or without viewing the delightfully detailed illustrations. 2001 (orig. 1996), August House LittleFolk, $19.95 and $9.95. Ages 3 to 7. Reviewer: Elizabeth Young
What a beautiful gift this book will make! Glossy, rich, full-page watercolors enrich this treasure of bedtime stories from around the world. Five stories from Siberia, Japan, Liberia, South America, and Britain express parental love, discipline, folklore, and repetitive themes. Two helpful sections for parents and teachers are "Telling These Stories to Children" and "About These Stories." 2001, August House Little Folk, $6.95. Ages 3 to 8. Reviewer: A. Braga SOURCE: Parent Council Volume 8
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2Margaret Read McDonald very expressively reads the stories from two of her books, Tuck Me in Tales (August House LittleFolk, 1996) and The Old Woman Who Lived in a Vinegar Bottle (August House LittleFolk, 1995). Her pace is fairly slow and very dramatic, coordinated with prominent dulcimer and autoharp accompaniment throughout. The collection begins with the British tale, "The Old Woman Who Lived in a Vinegar Bottle," and is followed by the Siberian folktale "Snow Bunting's Lullaby," in which a father bird develops a successful lullaby for his children only to have it stolen by a nasty raven. In "Chin Chin Kabokama," a young girl hides used toothpicks under her sleeping mat until little Samurai warriors appear each night and use them as swords, terrifying the messy girl. In the charming folktale from Liberia, "Kanji-jo, the Nestlings," a mother bird is separated from five hatchlings. Having never seen their mother, the baby birds find other birds willing to take care of them, but the babies seek the bird who can sing the lullaby they remember. McDonald's singing voice is pleasant enough though not extraordinary. "The Playground of the Sun and the Moon," an Araucanian tale from Chile and Argentina, depicts the sun's pursuit of the moon, explaining why the sun is not in the sky at night. The instrumental lullaby "Grand Is the Evening Sea" concludes side one and side two closes with an endless British tale, "Counting Sheep." Overall audio quality is good. Libraries with active storytelling collections will appreciate McDonald's latest work.Fritz Mitnick, Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw, PA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780874836226
Publisher:
August House Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
12/28/2005
Edition description:
1 PBK ED
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
8.69(w) x 11.03(h) x 0.19(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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