The Tuloriad (Human-Posleen War Series #12)

The Tuloriad (Human-Posleen War Series #12)

3.5 16
by John Ringo, Tom Kratman
     
 

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First Time in Paperback.

Latest in the New York Times best-selling Posleen War series.

The Direct Sequel to Yellow Eyes.

The Enemy of My Enemy . . .

Of the once innumerable battle clans of the Posleen only a handful survive. And that on the sufferance of a group of despised Indowy and Himmit. Plucked from the maelstrom on Earth they are

Overview

First Time in Paperback.

Latest in the New York Times best-selling Posleen War series.

The Direct Sequel to Yellow Eyes.

The Enemy of My Enemy . . .

Of the once innumerable battle clans of the Posleen only a handful survive. And that on the sufferance of a group of despised Indowy and Himmit. Plucked from the maelstrom on Earth they are cast out into the eternal blackness of the stars with only a slightly insane Indowy and a computer virus to guide them.

What follows is a trail of tears and remembrance as the Posleen retrace the footsteps of their ancestors in a search for their homeworld. A search to determine if the Posleen posess the one thing no Human would give them credit for: A soul.

Returned to their beginnings, the question remains: Is there a new path for the Tular Posleen?

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
In this sequel to Yellow Eyes, Ringo ("Legacy of the Aldenata" series) and Kratman (A State of Disobedience) recall the classic voyage of Odysseus after the fall of Troy. In the wake of their failed invasion of Earth, the alien Posleen are placed aboard a ship and sent into space followed by human members of various religions hoping to convert them. VERDICT Ringo's military sf is unparalleled, while his more thoughtful moments provide insights often missing from action-based sf. Fans of the series and the authors will enjoy this somber chronicle of victors and vanquished.
From the Publisher
"As its Homeric-sounding name suggests, the latest Posleen War novel (after 2007's Yellow Eyes) tells of a defeated people fleeing annihilation in search of a new home... They embark upon a search for the origin of their species and discover just how cruelly their people were treated long ago when their ancestors dared to question the godlike Aldenata... Ringo and Kratman turn this space adventure into an intriguing discussion of the power of faith apart from the existence of God." — Publishers Weekly (Oct.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781439134092
Publisher:
Baen
Publication date:
12/28/2010
Series:
Human-Posleen War Series, #12
Pages:
528
Sales rank:
203,035
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 6.60(h) x 1.50(d)

Meet the Author

John Ringo is author of the New York Times best-selling Posleen War series which so far includes A Hymn Before Battle, Gust Front, When the Devil Dances, Hell’s Faire and Eye of the Storm. as well as the connected novels Cally’s War, Sister Time and Honor of the Clan (with Julie Cochrane), The Hero (with ), and Watch on the Rhine and Yellow Eyes (with ), and is the hottest new military science fiction writer since David Weber. A veteran of the 82nd Airborne, Ringo brings first-hand knowledge of military operations to his novels of high-tech future war.

Tom Kratman, in 1974 at age seventeen, became a political refugee and defector from the PRM (People's Republic of ) by virtue of joining the Regular Army. He stayed a Regular Army infantryman most of his adult life, returning to as an unofficial dissident while attending after his first hitch. Tom is currently an attorney practicing in southwest . Baen published his previous collaborations with John Ringo, Watch on the Rhine and Yellow Eyes, as well as his solo novels, A State of Disobedience, A Desert Called Peace, Carnifex, Caliphate, and The Lotus Eaters.

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The Tuloriad (Human-Posleen War Series #12) 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
To save humanity, the Posleen aliens had to be defeated as the latter considered the former beneath them on the food chain; a source of sustenance. The final battle leaves mankind struggling but thriving and the Posleen almost extinct. Those few surviving Posleen begin a desperate mission to track their heritage although many of the sentient races belonging to the treacherous Galactic Confederation would prefer the final solution instead of what the Posleen may learn. At the same time, the Posleen prepares its trek, the victors in the war send missionaries from the major religious groups to convert the heathens to their particular religion. These self appointed emissaries of God catch up to the Posleen researchers. The Poleen are finding shocking evidence of their origins that shake the earthlings and representatives from the other races like the devious Darhel and the legacy of the benign manipulative Aldenata is not the altruism they thought they pursued. Hell and distrust between and even within species is the norm. The latest entry in the Posleen-Humanity science fiction thriller (adding war to the title seems inappropriate at this point) has less action than usual as John Ringo & Tom Kratman raise fascinating questions about religion, military intervention, and social rules. The story line however is very thin as the concepts for instance of the Muslim marital allowance, the "white man's burden" and the American invasion to take out a brutal bully in Iraq have parallels but never quite explored beyond a slim veneer as the authors detract from the plot with their opinion. Still fans of the series will enjoy this cerebral turn as the Posleen come across less B movie monstrous and more humane with the underlying theme asking do other sentient species have souls. Harriet Klausner
Delphaus More than 1 year ago
Finished this last night, and I found it to be extremely interesting. Mr. Kratman seems to have taken upon himself the task of exploring religion's role in motivating societies, and how religion and society interact to shape one another. The fact that it "humanized" what had previously been an entirely antagonistic species gives the series as a whole a new dimension. All told, a good read, and an interesting discussion. Personally, I think some of the reviewers here may have missed the point.
TexasWolf More than 1 year ago
While this isn't the usual, bang bang, oh cool an earth shattering KABOOM! novels you usually get from Ringo and to and extent Kratman. It is a good read. Tom Kratman's novels while following the bang bang type previously mentioned also tend to be a tad more cerebral..in that they force you to think. This one also engages your grey matter. I'm halfway through and thoroughly enjoying it. It's not just a ripping good time but a thought provoker. It's also a good miserable weather read. which I'm currently dealing with at the moment. If you've never read the series before, thats okay because you get a glimpse in the first chapter of WHY the posleen are doing what their doing. By all means feel free to buy all the posleen verse novels. :) If you've read the other works by Ringo and Kratman to include the original 4books in this univers..you already know you're going to love it right? Just for chuckle factor there is a species of creature in the book called Abat. Everytime I see the word I can't help but chuckle as I hearken back to the days of Abbot and Costello. 'Hey Abboooooott!' *grin*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Had I known this was a story about a missionary to the posleen, i wouldn't have taken the time. A couple of tidbits about the Aldenata was not worth it.
TheGreatSnook More than 1 year ago
Very similar to my review of the Eye of the Storm. This is a good book if you enjoy the series and enjoy Ringo's writing. However, this may be the last book I ever read of Ringo's. I have a problem with an author who "burns" his readers by writing a series and then just deciding to stop and move on to other things. In hindsight if I had known this I probably would have never read the series. With this book being what looks like the final book he will write in this universe, he leaves a lot of things hanging. I for one am disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
johnthorpe More than 1 year ago
If the Posleen needed religion they'd have it already. Come on, now, Tom K! The Posleen are a spacefaring race. what do they need Christianity for? How can they possibly relate to a human nailed on a cross owing to a concept they have no use or understanding of? The whole premise of this novel is a wash. I found this novel impossible to finish, and the extensive inclusion of religious dogma is a huge turn off. Trautman continues the Ringo credo of babes Hot, Stacked and Packing. The only ugly in the mix is the Posleen female, and she can't even talk! In the Afterword essay, Trautman heralds the one ABSOLUTE AFFIRMATION of a miracle, Read the wikipedia account of the Battle of Lepanto. I just don't see it. Divine Waterspout, anyone?!? And finally, TK says '...never go to a religious war without religion. You'll lose.' I guess Tom forgot about those Atheist Communists who managed to defeat a whole bunch of Christian Fascists back in WW II! Other books I would definitely not recommend and written by the same author. Watch on the Rhine--absolute crap. Yellow Eyes--a decent read, but longwinded and a poor copy of Ringo's style. None of the three works I've cited would I ever attempt to read again, nor any other work by this author. I loved the original Posleen saga. Really great stuff. Trautman's attempt at expanding the Posleen universe just doesn't cut it. I am Bright #1,000,001 P.S. And, Tom, it's AKA not ALA.
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Jvstin More than 1 year ago
Disclaimer: I received this book as an ARC from the Amazon Vine program. The Tuloriad is an ancillary novel in the Legacy of Aldenata (Posleen) universe of Eric Flint. The Tuloriad was written in collaboration between Flint and Tom Kratman. I only knew the basics of the Posleen universe and the premise before taking up this novel. In the Posleen series, alien races make first contact with man, in an effort to manipulate them as warriors against the galaxy-wide threat of the centauroid Posleen, an aggressive warrior species. The novels in the series, in its main lines and its side branches, explore the war between the Posleen and the humans, and other conflicts as well. The Tuloriad is set after the Posleen have been evicted, with enormous damage, from their occupation of portions of the Earth.The novel follows two strands--a group of humans sent by the Pope to try and give the Posleen a human faith in order to try and civilize them, and a group of the Posleen fleeing after the disaster of the invasion of Earth. While the military SF aspects of the book and some of the technological speculations and ideas are most interesting (high tech halberdiers for the win!), the rest of the novel is weak and underwritten. Although while I found the sentient embodied AI the most interesting single character, I didn't feel the human "mission" to the Posleen as interesting as the Posleen exodus thread. They were necessary to the finale, but otherwise could have been excised completely. There was a good novel in here, or bits of one, but its hard to find. The other problem with the novel is the afterword. Niven says that the technical term for someone who attributes the POV of a novel and its characters to its author is "idiot". However, the afterword makes it clear that the tone and themes of the novel is, indeed, a feature and not a bug. There are novels and authors who manage to use their faith and religious beliefs in a positive and constructive way. In this novel, and especially in its afterward, the authors instead use it like a bully club against anyone of divergent beliefs, Muslims and non-believers in particular. If I had read the afterword first, as I sometimes do, I would not have continued with the novel at all. Which is a shame because, despite the weaknesses I said above, there are a few things to find and enjoy in the novel and I would have missed them. I find I have no desire to return to Ringo's Posleen universe, although I suspect devotees of the universe will enjoy this volume far more than I did.