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Tupac Shakur

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"The tragedy of Tupac is that his untimely passing is representative of too many young black men in this country....If we had lost Oprah Winfrey at 25, we would have lost a relatively unknown, local market TV anchorwoman. If we had lost Malcolm X at 25, we would have lost a hustler nicknamed Detroit Red. And if I had left the world at 25, we would have lost a big-band trumpet player and aspiring composer--just a sliver of my eventual life potential."        
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New Book Brand New Excellent Condition! ! Softcover. Exactly As Shown in Picture and as described in product details. "Tupac Shakur". ISBN: 9780609802175. Ship with Delivery ... Confirmation. Fast Shipping, Reliable Service, Customer Satisfaction Guraranteed! ! Thank You! ! Read more Show Less

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Overview

"The tragedy of Tupac is that his untimely passing is representative of too many young black men in this country....If we had lost Oprah Winfrey at 25, we would have lost a relatively unknown, local market TV anchorwoman. If we had lost Malcolm X at 25, we would have lost a hustler nicknamed Detroit Red. And if I had left the world at 25, we would have lost a big-band trumpet player and aspiring composer--just a sliver of my eventual life potential."        
                From the Foreword by Quincy Jones

The real story of Tupac's murder may not ever emerge.  This may be the only lasting testament to the many faces of Tupac Shakur--of a life lived fast and hard, of a man cloaked in contradictions.  A young man who was just starting to come into his own.

"I believe that everything you do bad comes back to you. So everything that I do that's bad, I'm going to suffer for it. But in my heart, I believe what I'm doing is right. So I feel like I'm going to heaven."
        Tupac Shakur, June 1996

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780609802175
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/14/1998
  • Edition description: REVISED
  • Pages: 160
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

This is VIBE's first venture into book publishing, and the subject could not be more appropriate. There is no other artist we have covered as extensively as Tupac Shakur--he has appeared on our cover four times in this young magazine's life span. But the reason was never, as Mobb Deep suggested in one single, that "VIBE magazine on some love shit." No other individual touched our readers like Tupac. There was no one else we consistently received so many letters about--some supporting him, some attacking him; but all full of such intense passion and feeling, so much love, so much anger.

The overwhelming response made it clear that Tupac had come to embody all the contradictions and confusion that have grown up around hip hop. He was a lightning rod, a screen onto which millions of people projected their feelings about rap, about race, and about the young black man in America today. Tupac may be a legend now, but he's hardly a hero. Many young people may have looked up to him, but he himself often seemed to be searching for a leader.

"Laugh Now, Cry Later" was tattooed on Tupac's back, but there is no later, no time for crying when you're dead at 25, and not much time to laugh, either. The real story behind his murder may or may not ever emerge, but nothing will change the end result: One more young black man is dead for no good reason, one more young life is ended long before its time. And it is incumbent on all of us in and around the hip hop community to remember that this death is no triumphant, blaze-of-glory exit but just another senseless murder. We need to do everything in our power to help stop the killing.

When I spoke to a longtime family friend of the Shakurs the day after his death, she said, "I know he's in heaven, I just hope he's not giving the angels too hard a time."  Our thoughts are with Tupac's family and the fans who identified with him so strongly.

May Tupac Shakur rest in peace, and may the rest of us live in it.

Alan Light
Editor-in-Chief,
VIBE magazine

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Read an Excerpt

All That Glitters
By Rob Marriott

Tupac Amaru Shakur, hip hop's shining serpent, was gone. And now, so was Bobby Ray Finch. Under a cloudless stretch of L.A. sky, Finch's friends and family made the mournful circuit around Inglewood Cemetery. Low-flying planes swept tremendous shadows over the somber procession of mothers and off-duty officers, neighbors and fellow bodyguards, former gang members and present-day cholos, a girlfriend robbed of a lover, a daughter robbed of a father, and a reporter trying his best to look inconspicuous at an intimate family gathering.

I'd been covering the story since September 7, 1996, when a hail of bullets tore into Tupac's body for the second and final time in his brief life. Now, on September 18, six days after Shakur's death, I looked on as, one by one, Bobby Finch's family filed by and stared into his lifeless face. The carnations lying on the casket, as well as the casket itself, were baby blue, seeming to confirm reports that Bobby was a member of a marked gang, the Southside Crips, and was killed in retaliation for Tupac's shooting.

On the morning of September 11, Finch, age 30, was murdered in front of his mama's house in Compton while sitting at the wheel of his new Acura. He had just dropped off his 10-year-old daughter at school and was heading to the gym for a workout. According to a witness, a Honda Civic hatchback pulled up alongside Finch, and shots were fired. He was taken to Martin Luther King Jr. Medical Center with multiple chest wounds and pronounced dead minutes after arrival.

This was a case of mistaken identity. Bobby wasn't no gangbanger. "He wasn't part of that lifestyle," said Leshaun Smith, godfather of Bobby's daughter, in frustration. "Look," he told me, "if you live in an area, you know people. Around here, if somebody in a neighborhood does somethin' wrong, the entire neighborhood will suffer the consequences. The whole neighborhood is at risk."

"When the gangs do shit like this, they go after the ballers," explained Leshaun [baller  bolah n. 1: high-rolling hustler 2: nigga that got his money right, as opposed to a banger, who works in blood and bullets]. "They aim to take out the money first. Because Bobby had a nice car, they assumed he was a baller. He was a bodyguard, but he didn't work for none of them rappers. He had nothing to do with any of this."

Finch was one of three fatalities among 13 shootings police say resulted from the attack on Shakur and Knight. The two other dead men, Timothy Flanagan and Marcus Childs, were believed to be Piru Bloods. One of the survivors, a Southside Crip leader named Darnell Brim, was ambushed in a convenience store and shot several times. An innocent bystander, 10-year-old Lakezia McNeese, caught a stray bullet in the back. When the shooter approached Brim's fallen body, gun outstretched to finish the job, he saw Lakezia's wounded form lying beneath Brim's. He paused and then walked away without firing.

As I stood in the back of the church at Finch's funeral, listening to a young woman sing the last stanzas of Precious Lord, someone grabbed me by the arm and pulled me out of the service. He was a hulking, off-duty LAPD officer, one of several cops regularly employed by Death Row as security guards. He recognized me as one of the reporters who'd stood vigil outside the Vegas hospital where Tupac took his final breaths.

"What are you doing here?" he whispered, his eyes darting.

"Just trying to find out what's going on."

"I hope you realize you're playing a dangerous game."

"What you mean?"

"Just be careful with what you write."

And so it has gone for the past few months. Cryptic warnings. Demanded anonymity. Lies and whispers. Few in L.A. have been willing to speak on record about anything relating to the ongoing Death Row saga. Vegas police have alternately affirmed and denied that they have any suspects in Tupac's murder. They have yet to arrest anyone, even though a 29-year-old Compton resident named Orlando Anderson was reportedly heard bragging about his involvement days after the shooting.

There are no easy answers to the myriad questions surrounding Tupac's death. But it has become clear that the rap star's killing, and the three homicides that followed, are only the most visible tragedies in a tangled web of intrigue that extends deep into the L.A. underworld--a place where entertainers, cops, gangstas, lawyers, and bodyguards coexist in the same shadowy milieu of nepotism and corruption. Its still very much the wild, wild West out here, and the truth, especially the bloody truth, is hard to come by.

Since February 28, when Suge Knight caught a nine-year bid, everything you thought you knew about Death Row has been thrown into question. Did Knight really build the $300 million empire from the ground up, or was start-up money provided by an incarcerated drug kingpin? Was Knight really the man calling the shots, or was it his attorney, David Kenner? And was Knight so short on cash that mortgaging Death Row's assets to its distributor, Interscope Records, was his only option?

The spray of lead that took Tupac's life had been a long time coming but it wasn't coming from where most of the media suspected. Numerous reporters, quick to vilify hip hop music, assumed that the shooting was related to the highly publicized feud between East (Bad Boy) and West (Death Row). But any evidence implicating Puffy and Biggie was slim at best. According to police, they had been known to enlist members of the Southside Crips, who'd been feuding with the Mob Piru Bloods for years, as personal security.

But among Compton residents and police informants, one name kept coming up in connection with Shakur's fatal shooting: Orlando Napolian Anderson, also known as Baby Lando, a reputed Southside Crip from nearby Lakewood.

According to a Compton police affidavit, the stage was set for Pac's murder approximately two months earlier when some Crips and Bloods ran into one another at the Lakewood Mall. Travon Lane (a.k.a. Tray), a five-foot-four Mob Piru who was wearing a diamond-encrusted Death Row pendant, was in the mall's Foot Locker store with fellow Pirus Kevin Woods (a.k.a. K.W.) and Maurice Combs (a.k.a. Lil Mo) when they were confronted by seven to eight Southside Crips. The two crews got into it, and Tray's pendant was taxed.

On September 7, Tray attended the Mike Tyson/Bruce Seldon fight with Suge, Tupac, and other members of Death Row. After the fight, Tray recognized Orlando Anderson in the MGM Grand Hotel lobby as one of the Crips who stole his pendant. Pac, ever the soldier, stepped up to Lando and asked, You from the South? It became a rhetorical question when Pac and the crew got to kicking and stomping Anderson into the ground. Shakur, it seems, had finally crossed the line from gangsta rapper to official L.A. gang member. According to the police affidavit, he had recently added a MOB tattoo to one of his heavily illustrated arms.

The melee, broken up by MGM security, was recorded by the hotel's surveillance cameras. Security personnel advised the victim, identified only as Orlando, to file a report. He refused and soon left the hotel. About three hours later, Suge and Pac were in Knight's black BMW 750, leading a caravan of cars along the Strip. While they idled at a red light, a late-model white Cadillac rode up alongside.

"We was at the light," Suge told police some days later, "We was havin' a conversation; heard some gunshots. We looked to the right of us. Tupac was tryin' to get in the backseat. . . . I grabbed him and pulled him down. It was about fifteen gunshots." Police reports said that shell casings from a Glock .40-caliber were recovered from the scene.

Investigators turned up leads 220 miles to the southwest, in L.A., where gang members had already begun exchanging gunfire. An informant told cops that on September 9, two days after Pac's shooting, he'd seen a Southside Crip by the name of Jerry Monk Bonds driving a late-model white Cadillac into an automotive shop at White and Alondra in Compton. On September 10, cops saw Monk and Orlando Anderson drive to 1315 Glencoe Avenue, a known Southside Crip safe house and hangout. Police raided the Glencoe duplex that same day, recovering seven ski masks, an assault rifle, and a large amount of ammunition, including Smith & Wesson .40-caliber rounds. They also found photos of gang members and a black duffel bag with a Southwest Airlines baggage tag bearing a Las Vegas address.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 13 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2004

    tupac still out there

    I loved the book 2pac i know you're still alive n out there peace jen

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2002

    2pac the greatest

    The book on 2pac is wicked, all ya need 2 know and more on the worlds greatest rapper!!!!!! Any great fan of 2pac would read this book and enjoy it....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2001

    The real shining serpent

    On the 16th of june 1971 god sent down and angel named Tupac Amaru Shakur. This book shows the life and times of that angle. Nobody knew the real tupac, the don inside of him. This book reveals it all. He peeped the weekness in the rap game and sowed it. Take a glimpse in his world.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2001

    An important piece of memorabilia

    This book is not for someone who wants to read a great deal. However it is an outstanding insight to the gr8 performer/rap star. It shows detailed pictures and tells stories that u might not have already known. This book is totally worth buying, if not for a good read then for keeping as a reminder of the gr8 2pac!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2000

    The best

    Tupac was a great role model, and someone to look up to. he brought out the best in all of us, and was always there to help charity. Even though he had words in his songs that were vulgar, it was a great way to express his feelings. The most Influincual Rapper of all time ------Nick

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2000

    (NONE)

    This is the best most in depth book on Tupac that is available so far. This goes al the way back to the begging when he was born and stops after he died. A awesome book to have!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2000

    This is the best bio ever!

    I think that this book is the most indepth book on the life of Tupac Shakur. I would reccomend this book for any other TUPAC fan in the world. Cuz this book will tell u practially anything u want 2 know about 2pac and his life. BUY THIS BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2000

    Denise's thoughts

    This Bio is, by far, the best Bio I have ever read. It's a look into the life of Tupac. It's the type of Bio that would make haters have a new respect for Hip-Hop, and Tupac. Any and everyone that likes Tupac should definately buy this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2000

    THIS BIOGRAPHIE IS QUIET OUTSTANDING TO SAY THE LEAST!!!

    I GAVE THIS BIOGRAPHIE A RATING OF FIVE STARS FOR THE SIMPLE FACT THAT IT DESERVED IT.TUPAC SHAKUR WAS AND STILL IS MY FAVORITE RAP ARTIST OR INDUVISUAL FOR THE SIMPLE FACT THAT HE WAS 100% STRAIGHT UP AND HE NEVER CHANGED HE STAYED TRUE AND EVAN WHEN HE MADE IT BIG HE KEPT CLOSE TITHE'S WITH HIS OLD PEER'S AND NEVER GOT TO CAUGHT UP IN HIS OWN LIFE TO RELOCATE AND REMEMBER WHAT HE CAME FROM.I REALY ENJOYED THIS BIO BECAUSE HONESTLY MOST BOOK'S WANT TO MAKE IT OUT BASICLY LIKE THE MEDIA AND SOCIETY ACCEPTED TUPAC AS THIS THUG,GANGSTA,REBEL,BUT THIS BOOK WENT DEEP TO SHOW THE REAL TUPAC THAT KNOWONE KNEW.IT SHOW'S THE HARDSHIP'S AND THE UNBELIEVABLE TRIAL'S AND TRIBULATION'S THAT HE HAD TO INDURE AND HOW HE CAME UP OUT OF THEM SITUATION'S TO MAKE SOMETHING OUT OF HIS LIFE.PLUS ALL THE PICTURE'S.SEE USUALY THERE'S HARDLY ANY PICTURE'S BUT YOUR BOOK DID AND THAT WAS REALY COOL.WELL I HOPE IVE STRESSED THE REASON IN WHICH I RATED THE BIOGRAPHY ON THE LATE GREAT 'TUPAC-AMARU-SHAKUR'(SHINING SERPENT-THANKFUL TO GOD) JULY,16TH,1971-SEPTEMBER,13TH,1996 FIVE STAR'S BECAUSE IT TRUELY DESERVED IT.THANK YOU FOR PUBLISHING SUCH A GREAT BIOGRAPHIE!THANK'S...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2000

    2pac is the bomb

    2pac is the coolest man i've ever met and this book explained him very realisticly

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2000

    GOOD BOOK!

    IT WAS VERY GOOD & IMFORMATIVE. A COLLECTION OF MAGAZINE CLIPPINS & PICTURES.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 1999

    Best book ever wrote about Tupac

    Its a shame that we had to lose a good rapper, but its good to know that when one is gone, he still has friends in the world to give him respect. This book says it all from the first day to the last.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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