Turing and the Computer: The Big Idea

Turing and the Computer: The Big Idea

3.7 3
by Paul Strathern
     
 
The computer has revolutionized the modern age of communication and has touched every part of modern life. Without a doubt, the development of the computer was a massive leap forward in humankind's progress and will stand as one of the twentieth century's greatest achievements. But how many of us know how it really works? "Turing And The Computer" offers a brilliant

Overview

The computer has revolutionized the modern age of communication and has touched every part of modern life. Without a doubt, the development of the computer was a massive leap forward in humankind's progress and will stand as one of the twentieth century's greatest achievements. But how many of us know how it really works? "Turing And The Computer" offers a brilliant encapsulation of the groundwork that led to the invention of the computer as we know it, and an absorbing account of the man who helped develop it, only to be largely forgotten after his death. Eccentric and principled, Turing would lay aside a brilliant career in mathematics to serve his country by breaking German codes during the Second World War. Openly homosexual, he would later be put on trial on indecency charges and forced to undergo hormone treatments that wrecked his body and his spirit. But the modern machine he helped create lives on.

Concise and thoroughly compelling, "Turing And The Computer" is for all those curious about the philosophy and mechanics behind the now indispensable computer, and for anyone awed by the spark of invention that inspires its birth.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Offers an encapsulation of the groundwork that led to the invention of the computer as we know it, as well as an account of the eccentric and principled Turing, who set aside a brilliant career in mathematics to serve his country by breaking German codes during World War II (he was later put on trial on indecency charges and forced to undergo hormone treatments). Some of the topics covered include how Turing mapped out the theory of computers before a single computer had been conceived, how his Collossus broke the German Enigma codes, and his proof of the existence of artificial intelligence. No index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385492430
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/20/1999
Series:
Big Idea Series
Edition description:
1 ANCHOR
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.23(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.31(d)

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Turing and the Computer: The Big Idea 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous 12 months ago
The Big Idea: Turing and the Computer is about the struggles and obstacles that Alan Turing and his team of advanced code breakers had to overcome in order to break “Enigma”. Enigma was used to code Nazi communications during the second world war, and Turing used his knowledge of computers and code to build a machine fit for decoding these seeming nonsensical German messages. The book was narrated in a biographical form and it is set in modern day, but it has information from the second world war. Turing and the Computer was written by Paul Strathern and he has written many other biographies and historical novels on people and events of the past. I quite liked this book and I found it to be quite interesting. I saw The Imitation Game, a movie on Alan Turing and his machine, so I already knew some background information, but it was even more interesting to learn additional facts about this revolutionary machine and its creator. I would definitely recommend this book to others because it is a succinct, yet informative summary of his story, without being too long.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is good for a quick superficial sequential knowledge of events and their historical impacts over time, yet what the narrative lacks is analysis.  Strathern goes through the entire history of computer from before the Common Era to the 20s in fewer than 50 pages, hitting just about every major innovation and their implications for the entire technological timeline. While this is an admirable feat, it feels a little rushed and is very much written in the style of “this is what happened, this is what it caused, okay let’s move on.”  The same is true for the section devoted to Turing’s life and achievements. Again, Strathern gives a very good account of events, their sequence, and their implications, but he doesn’t really delve into what exactly the technology was. Yes, Colossus was a code-breaking machine, but how did it break codes? Yes, Turing was a forefather of Artificial Intelligence and his senior thesis on it was revolutionary in its own right, but what exactly did it say? The book doesn’t offer any explication or analysis in this way. Naturally, because it’s only a 100 page book primarily aimed at a younger audience I wouldn’t expect a break down of the intense and complicated mathematics and theory involved in these innovations, but some understanding of the workings of these machines is just as important as understand how they were important.  Generally, this is a great jumping off point for more independent research and establishing a timeline for Turing’s life, from his Cambridge work until his untimely death.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A neat little introduction to the birth of the computer and one of the men who was instrumental in its development. After providing the reader with a brief history of the development of the computer; the author sketches some highlights of Turing's life: Cambridge days, development of the theory of computers, breaking the Germany Military Enigma Code which hastened the end of WW II, and Turing's ground breaking work on artificial intelligence. Finally, the author portrays Turing's arrest and trial for homosexuality which subsequently led to his suicide. If you are looking for a succinct introduction to one of the most brilliant but misunderstood geniuses of the 20th century, read this book.