Turn Homeward, Hannalee

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Overview

During the closing days of the Civil War, plucky 12-year-old Hannalee Reed, sent north to work in a Yankee mill, struggles to return to the family she left behind in war-torn Georgia. "A fast-moving novel based upon an actual historical incident with a spunky heroine and fine historical detail."--School Library Journal. Author's note.

"There are few authors who can consistently manage both to entertain and inform." --Booklist

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Overview

During the closing days of the Civil War, plucky 12-year-old Hannalee Reed, sent north to work in a Yankee mill, struggles to return to the family she left behind in war-torn Georgia. "A fast-moving novel based upon an actual historical incident with a spunky heroine and fine historical detail."--School Library Journal. Author's note.

"There are few authors who can consistently manage both to entertain and inform." --Booklist

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Janet L. Rose
When the Union army invaded the South, they closed the clothing mills and took the workers (mainly women and children) as prisoners. They were sent north and hired out as servants, farm hands, and mill workers. Twelve-year-old Hannalee and her ten-year-old brother, who were mill workers, were taken from their mother and sent north. Some of the people who hired the Southerners hated them because their sons or husbands were killed in the war. Some were sympathetic and understanding. Hannalee had promised her mother she would return home. One day she escapes from her family, dons trousers to masquerade as a boy, finds her brother, and heads home. She encounters southern outlaws, wounded soldiers, and Southerners who have decided to stay in the north to live a better life. Also, she and her brother witness the bloody battle of Franklin. This little-known aspect of the Civil War tells what happened to some of the poor Southerners who were trying to eke out a living on their own. Patricia Beatty presents a variety of viewpoints and emotions from both the North and the South, all of which are believable and gives children an insight as to what life was like in the 1860s and the horrors of war.
BookList
There are few authors who can consistently manage both to entertain and inform.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780688166762
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 6/28/1999
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 319,842
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 7.62 (h) x 0.41 (d)

Meet the Author

Patricia Beatty was born in Portland, Oregon, and was a longtime resident of southern California. After graduating from college, she taught high school English and history, and later held various positions as a science and technical librarian and also as a children's librarian. She taught Writing Fiction for Children at several branches of the University of California.

Patricia Beatty is the author of many popular and award-winning children's books, including such NCSS Notable Children's Trade Books in the Field of Social Studies as Eight Mules from Monterey; Behave Yourself, Bethany Brant; Turn Homeward, Hannalee; Be Ever Hopeful, Hannalee; and Jayhawker. Her novel Lupita Mañana is a Jane Addams Children's Book Award honor book, and Charley Skedaddle won the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction.

Deliciously terrifying short short tales and creepy illustrations by an exceptional collection of writers and illustrators.

Nadia Aguiar, M.T. Anderson, Katherine Applegate, Margaret Atwood, Avi, Holly Black, Pseudonymous Bosch, Libba Bray, Lisa Brown, Michael Connelly, Mark Crilley, Joseph Delaney, Dan Ehrenhaft, Carson Ellis, Neil Gaiman, Jack Gantos, Tom Genrich, Stacey Godiner, Carol Gorman, Alan Gratz, Josh Greenhut, Adele Griffin, Dan Gutman, Brett Helquist, Erin Hunter, Angela Johnson, Aliza Kellerman, Faye Kellerman, M. E. Kerr, Jon Klassen, Alice Kuipers, Jonathan Lethem, Gail Carson Levine, Lesley Livingston, Dean Lorey, Gregory Maguire, Stephen Marche, Melissa Marr, Alison McGhee, Brad Meltzer, Sienna Mercer, Lauren Myracle, Jenny Nimmo, Joyce Carol Oates, Ken Oppel, James Patterson, Michèle Perry, Yvonne Prinz, Francine Prose, Vladimir Radunsky, Chris Raschka, Aaron Renier, Adam Rex, David Rich, Richard Sala, Jon Scieszka, Brian Selznick, Arthur Slade, Abi Slone, Lane Smith, Lemony Snicket, Sonya Sones, Jerry Spinelli, David Stahler Jr., R. L. Stine, Allan Stratton, Tui T. Sutherland, Mariko Tamaki, Sarah L. Thomson, Frank Viva, Ayelet Waldman, Sarah Weeks, Gloria Whelan, Barry Yourgrau

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The Scarlet Skies

It was the crying from dawn below that woke me up that hot night. I caught the words clear as the mill bell: "No, you can't say that to me. You can't say you won't two times, Davey Reed, not again you can't!"

I sat up to listen, being careful not to pull on the bedclothes and disturb Mama, who was asleep beside me.

Then I heard another, deeper voice, saying something softly. After that came a wordless cry, then a wild weeping, and a minute later the sound of somebody running.

Rosellen! It was Rosellen and my older brother, Davey, down there talking at the front door. No, not talking — quarreling. Rosellen was the one who did most of the talking and then ran of. It must have been a really fierce quarrel for her to raise her voice. That wasn't like Rosellen Sanders.

I sighed, listening now to hear if Mama had been woken up, too; but no, her breathing hadn't changed. Mama had slept through the ruckus below our window. That was good. With the baby coming, she needed her rest these days. I lay back on my pillow and closed my eyes, hoping to fall asleep fast, but I knew I wouldn't. I used to sleep like a log, but since the war had begun three years ago, every time I woke up at night I stayed awake for a long time. I'd lie awake worrying about Davey, who is fighting in the Confederate Army, and about us Reeds, now that Pap died in an army hospital last winter. And now I had a new worry-the misery between Davey and his longtime true love, Rosellen.

While I was pondering them, I heard Mama stir. Then I heard her say, "Hannalee, do I hear you sighin'?"

"Yes, Mama, I was. I'mnot asleep. Do you want somethin'?"

It was her turn to sigh into the dark. She whispered, "Honey, would you fetch me some cold water? Not from the pitcher in the pantry but from the pump outside. I'd like some real cold well water. I'm dry as an old bone from all that talkin' tonight with you and Davey and the Sanderses. I'm hot, and the baby's movin' in me. He's woke up, too."

I swung my legs over the side of the bed and stayed there for a minute, thinking of the baby that was to come in the fall. Marna always spoke of the baby as "him." I hoped this baby would be a boy, and favor Pap in being redheaded. None of the rest of us, neither Davey, my little ten-year-old brother, Jem, nor I, had his hair. We were all black-haired and brown-eyed, and favored Mama, who had some Cherokee Indian blood in her family. Pap's dying was a deep ache to us, and a boy baby who looked like him would be a comfort.

I found the chinaware cup on the pine table next to the bed on my side, picked it up, and made my way across the room and down the stairs as quietly as I could. I didn't want to wake up Jem as I went past his bedroom.

I walked through the dark house and went outside into the hot night. It was late June, and the red rambler rose that Pap had planted beside the back door was in bloom. He'd planted the sweet-smelling rose even though this wasn't really our house but one we rented from the millowners. But that had been like Pap — he had always favored pretty things.

Thinking of him, I looked up at the sky. That was when I saw it-the bright red flare to the southwest. I pressed the cup to my chest, watching. There it was again! Another blaze of red, and then another. They were sharp bursts of light that came and went, always in the southwest. I knew they weren't summer lightning. Lightning made jagged streaks slicing through the sky or sometimes sheets of light that lit up everything. Besides, lightning was white or blue, not red, and thunder came after it. These flashes were silent, like suddenly blossoming red flowers.

I didn't like them. A cold little breeze that went right through my old cotton nightgown made me shiver. Fear caught hold of me, the same kind that now came to me whenever I met up with anything strange. Pap's dying of camp fever in Virginia had done that to me. Marna confessed she felt the same way, too, now that he was gone from us.

While I watched the red lights, I suddenly heard a soft coughing from somewhere near me. When it came again, I knew who it was. Davey. He'd come around from the front of the house. Davey'd brought a cough back home with him from his army camp in Virginia. He'd been sick like Pap, but he'd gotten over it except for the cough. He'd come home on furlough for a week and was going back to Virginia the day after tomorrow.

Before I could call out his name, he asked fiercely, "Who's out here? I can hear you breathin'."

"Me, Hannalee. I'm goin' to get some cold water for Marna. Did you think I was a Yankee boy, Davey?"

"Bein' a soldier makes a man careful . . ." He shut of what he had meant to say and told me, "Get the water and get inside, little sister. You shouldn't be walkin' around in the dark."

"I won't be long at the pump. Davey, what's that over there in the sky to the south and west? Can you see the red lights...

Turn Homeward, Hannalee. Copyright © by Patricia Beatty. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 12 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2007

    Read this book

    I think the author did a wonderful job at writing this book. This book is filled with lots of suspence and sadniss. Hannalee is the main character and she has to be very brave to survive what her main job is in the book. If you like books were people make huge risks and have to do hard things this would be the book for you. I can't tell you what happens so get this book and read and you should end up liking it. Have fun reading this great book!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2007

    READ THIS BOOK

    Turn Homeward Hannalee is a book about a girl named Hannalee and her brother named, Jem. They get sent away by the Yankees during the Civil war because they are mill hands. Her mom is pregnant but they can't help anymore. Hannalee fights her and her brother's way back home. It is exciting, sad, scary, and, and, and. Wait! I can't tell you the whole thing! See for yourself. This book can be found at Morris Brandon Elementary School's Library. I hope you have a great time reading this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2002

    The spunk to carry on through seperation and war. . . . .

    When Hannalee, a bobin girl, sees red skies over the Roswell Mill, she knows that trouble will rise. The next day, the Yankees attack the mill and take away all the mill workers to work in the north for the Yankees. Hannalee's mother tells her to turn homward as soon as the war ends and gives her a button. Hannalee and her brother are to be seperated so Hannalee cuts off her braids and gives them to Jem. But even so, Jem is sold to a Maryland farmer and Hannalee is forced to be a maid in a wealthy banker's house in Indiania, where she faces prejustice because she is a Reb. Hannalee and her brother escape and find that her older brother, Davey, is dead. Heartbroken, the two head homward and find Mama. Dacey has survived the war and plans to move the family to Alanta.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2002

    The spunk to carry on through seperation and war. . . . .

    When Hannalee, a bobin girl, sees red skies over the Roswell Mill, she knows that trouble will rise. The next day, the Yankees attack the mill and take away all the mill workers to work in the north for the Yankees. Hannalee's mother tells her to turn homward as soon as the war ends and gives her a button. Hannalee and her brother are to be seperated so Hannalee cuts off her braids and gives them to Jem. But even so, Jem is sold to a Maryland farmer and Hannalee is forced to be a maid in a wealthy banker's house in Indiania, where she faces prejustice because she is a Reb. Hannalee and her brother escape and find that her older brother, Davey, is dead. Heartbroken, the two head homward and find Mama. Dacey has survived the war and plans to move the family to Alanta.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2000

    Remember Mamma Hannalee

    This book is a great story. It's very moving and makes you wonder how you would act in the same situation. You're a little girl and all alone in a strange place, what do you do? One thing I liked was the way it was written in a realistic way and on a true subject. So I suggest you read on!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2000

    This is a very good book!

    I read this book for school and enjoyed it. I found that once you started you didn't want to put it down! A great story with lots enjoyable reading! So for your next book report I would read this! Or even for your own enjoyment

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    Posted May 30, 2009

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    Posted December 14, 2011

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    Posted January 27, 2011

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    Posted July 7, 2009

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    Posted August 11, 2009

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    Posted November 24, 2009

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