Turning Point Inventions: The Lightbulb

Turning Point Inventions: The Lightbulb

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by Joseph E. Wallace, Toby Welles
     
 

When Thomas Alva Edison was a boy, he couldn't just flick a switch to turn on the light if he wanted to finish reading a book after the sun had set. He grew up in a world where there was no dependable, safe, and inexpensive source of artificial light. Then, in 1879, he invented the lightbulb, and houses, shops, factories, schools, streets, ballparks -- every place you… See more details below

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Overview

When Thomas Alva Edison was a boy, he couldn't just flick a switch to turn on the light if he wanted to finish reading a book after the sun had set. He grew up in a world where there was no dependable, safe, and inexpensive source of artificial light. Then, in 1879, he invented the lightbulb, and houses, shops, factories, schools, streets, ballparks -- every place you could think of, indoors and out -- could at last be easily illuminated after dark. By turning night into day, the lightbulb changed the world.

Turning Point Inventions is the first series of books to focus on the important inventions we often take for granted and how they have affected our lives. In lively text and fascinating pictures, these books explore the world before the invention; the life of the inventor and how he or she came upon the discovery; how the world was changed by the invention; and how it may influence our future. A special full-color foldout in each book shows in detail how the invention works.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689828164
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
09/01/1999
Series:
Turning Point Inventions Series
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
80
Product dimensions:
9.27(w) x 9.24(h) x 0.49(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Read an Excerpt

From Chapter 3: Inventing the Lightbulb When you sit down to write a report, do you ever find that you have no idea how to begin?

You're not the only one to feel that way sometimes. Even a genius like Thomas Edison, who seemed to spend every minute of every day working on his inventions, often found himself unable to figure out what to do next. "In trying to perfect a thing, I sometimes run straight up against a granite wall a hundred feet high," he said.

But he wouldn't let these "walls" stop him. "I never allow myself to become discouraged under any circumstances," he said. This attitude was a necessity: While working on a new invention, he might try thousands of different ways to make it work, all of which would fail.

Once, an assistant got frustrated with this approach and said they should just give up, since they hadn't learned anything. Edison, though, thought his assistant was missing the point. "I cheerily assured him that we had learned something," he explained. "For we had learned with a certainty that the thing couldn't be done that way, and that we would have to try some other way."

Copright © 1999 by CommonPlace Publishing LLC

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