Turning the Tables: Restaurants and the Rise of the American Middle Class, 1880-1920

Turning the Tables: Restaurants and the Rise of the American Middle Class, 1880-1920

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by Andrew P. Haley
     
 

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In the nineteenth century, restaurants served French food to upper-class Americans with aristocratic pretensions, but by the turn of the century, even the best restaurants cooked ethnic and American foods for middle-class urbanites. In Turning the Tables, Andrew P. Haley examines how the transformation of public dining that established the middle class as the

Overview

In the nineteenth century, restaurants served French food to upper-class Americans with aristocratic pretensions, but by the turn of the century, even the best restaurants cooked ethnic and American foods for middle-class urbanites. In Turning the Tables, Andrew P. Haley examines how the transformation of public dining that established the middle class as the arbiter of American culture was forged through battles over French-language menus, scientific eating, cosmopolitan cuisines, unescorted women, un-American tips, and servantless restaurants.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Haley's book reinforces the importance of consumption as a vehicle for class formation and does immeasurable service in exploring restaurants as one of the important sites where this occurred.—American Historical Review

Scholars of food, culture, and the middle class will find this book useful . . . . It offers diverse sources and avenues for future exploration while establishing the prominence of middle-class dining culture in urban America.—H-SHGAPE

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807877920
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
05/30/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
376
File size:
3 MB

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Many scholars have viewed the transformation in dining near the turn of the century as an inevitable result of modernizing attitudes, but Andrew Haley successfully argues that these changes instead represent a contest over cultural influence. Turning the Tables restores agency to the middle class, providing an insightful exploration of how middle-class consumers exerted collective cultural and economic power that shaped the commercial marketplace and the material culture of dining.—Krishnendu Ray, author of The Migrant's Table: Meals and Memories in Bengali-American Households

Meet the Author

Andrew P. Haley is assistant professor of American cultural history at the University of Southern Mississippi.

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Turning the Tables: Restaurants and the Rise of the American Middle Class, 1880-1920 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago