Turning the Tables

Overview

In Turning the Tables, bestselling author Daniel Burstein has written a book that could totally reshape our thinking about U.S.-Japan relations. Until very recently, Americans felt out-competed and defeated by Japan, Inc. Then, suddenly, the Tokyo stock market crashed and the Japanese economic bubble burst. American fear of Japan subsided. Indeed, it has even become fashionable to dismiss the Japanese competitive threat. But in Turning the Tables Burstein warns that if Americans ignore Japan, we do so only at our...
See more details below
Paperback
$16.85
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$18.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $12.83   
  • New (7) from $12.83   
  • Used (3) from $18.16   
Sending request ...

Overview

In Turning the Tables, bestselling author Daniel Burstein has written a book that could totally reshape our thinking about U.S.-Japan relations. Until very recently, Americans felt out-competed and defeated by Japan, Inc. Then, suddenly, the Tokyo stock market crashed and the Japanese economic bubble burst. American fear of Japan subsided. Indeed, it has even become fashionable to dismiss the Japanese competitive threat. But in Turning the Tables Burstein warns that if Americans ignore Japan, we do so only at our peril. Japan will be back - leaner, meaner, and more competitive than ever before. Even now, despite the stock market crash, Japanese industry leads the world in ten "core competencies" critical to economic growth and the development of new global industries in the next century. Before we know it, the Japanese advances in robotics and "flexible manufacturing" will be the new gauntlets thrown down to American business, in the way that "quality" suddenly emerged as an issue in the 1980s. Burstein reveals the real story behind the Japanese financial bubble, explaining how Tokyo's authorities consciously chose to burst it - at great cost - in order to reinvent a new and still more successful Japan. Yet the full re-emergence of Japanese strength may take up to five years. In the meantime, an extraordinary window of opportunity has opened up for American companies to wrest global market share from their Japanese competitors. Now Washington also has a chance to develop an intelligent new Japan strategy. Burstein shows that Americans must move quickly to take maximum advantage of this situation before the window closes. Challenging the "rote" thinking that confuses problems with solutions, Burstein argues that it is time to stop treating Japan as America's economic enemy, and instead approach it as a potential partner in rebuilding the American economy. The best way to launch the desperately needed process of American economic renewal is not by "getting tough"
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this provocative look at Japanese-American business relations, Burstein ( Yen! ) analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of the two countries' economic practices. He suggests turning confrontational politics into a mutually beneficial alliance, which he believes both countries are ready for. Citing Machiavelli's advice to distinguish between virtues that are ruinous and vices that are profitable, he recommends that the U.S. welcome increased Japanese investment in its plants and worker training, while at the same time demanding increased Japanese use of U.S. parts and supplies. While deploring monopolistic practices, he thinks American business should encourage more industrial networking: instead of pursuing confrontation on rice exports of Japan, U.S-based companies should focus on more productive technological cooperation and on developing a genuine Pacific free market. He advocates federal support of some fledgling industries and calls for well-formulated government industrial policy. He sees an opportunity for estabishing a productive alliance now while Japan's economy is in the doldrums. (Feb.)
Library Journal
The author of the best-selling Yen! (S. & S., 1988; Columbine: Fawcett, 1990. reprint) and Euroquake ( LJ 4/1/91) continues to provoke thought on America's best strategy for global competitiveness in the 21st century. Currently, Burstein says, the United States suffers from a ``competitiveness gap.'' While Japan builds better, cheaper cars, Washington tries to strong-arm Japan into buying less competitive American autos. Instead, he argues, we should be trying to open markets for the American goods that can compete, like software and biotechnology. The United States should also establish a Trans-Pacific free trade area with Japan. By trading on each others' strengths, instead of weaknesses, both sides could win the game. Burstein's book, which will be in demand in both popular and academic business collections, presents complex issues clearly. Highly recommended.-- Kris Swank, American Graduate Sch. of Internat. Management Lib., Glendale, Ariz .
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743237901
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 2/15/2002
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 0.62 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)