Turning the Templar Key: Martyrs, Freemasons and the Secret of the True Cross of Christ

Turning the Templar Key: Martyrs, Freemasons and the Secret of the True Cross of Christ

3.0 1
by Robert Lomas
     
 

Why were the Knight’s Templar forcibly disbanded? What happened to their legacy? Were the Templars wiped out or did they survive by starting new orders to preserve their secrets? Robert Lomas, best-selling author of Turning the Hiram Key, investigates the facts, challenges the conspiracy theorists, and takes the reader on an inspiring and complex

Overview


Why were the Knight’s Templar forcibly disbanded? What happened to their legacy? Were the Templars wiped out or did they survive by starting new orders to preserve their secrets? Robert Lomas, best-selling author of Turning the Hiram Key, investigates the facts, challenges the conspiracy theorists, and takes the reader on an inspiring and complex quest to uncover the truth and motives behind the enduring myth of the Templars.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780853182863
Publisher:
Allan, Ian Publishing
Publication date:
10/12/2007
Pages:
388
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.40(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Turning the Templar Key: Martyrs, Freemasons and the Secret of the True Cross of Christ 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Mistress_Nyte More than 1 year ago
I am one of those people who is fascinated by all things Templar, so I was pleased to read this book. I admit to my own romantic notions about the historical Templars being colored by wonderful stories such as those told by Dan Brown, but I have also expanded my knowledge of these men by reading books of research and insight, and am in no way near complete with my own personal delving into who these men were and what they may have done in the past. This book brought to light many interesting topics that have circled around the mythology of the Templars, and its aim was to search for the validity behind these myths, or to disprove them entirely. The author really got his hands dirty in his research. As a Freemason himself, he was uniquely placed to lay his hands onto some probably otherwise more difficult to obtain tidbits, and as a scientist, he is able to sift through the various scores of information out there, to tie together some very intriguing ideas. His research led him from the beginnings of freemasonry to Rosslyn Chapel, to William the 12th Baron and his secret ambitions to claim a crown of his own, to the extreme past of the beginnings of farming over the nomadic lifestyle that humans had led until farming took hold. And as varied as many of these topics may seem, the author ties them all together nicely. While some of the information put forward in this book was far more complex and intimate in the workings of Masons, I enjoyed this book quite a lot, and I am looking forward to reading more books by this author in the future, as it appears that his interests seem to mirror many of my own.