Tutankhamun: The Mysteries of the Boy King

Tutankhamun: The Mysteries of the Boy King

by Zahi Hawass
     
 

Mysterious boy king Tutankhamun returns to the U.S. in 2008, bringing rare treasures never before seen outside Egypt. For the millions of fans wanting a keepsake and chronicle of this magnificent new exhibition, this book will delight. Created by world-renowned art historians under the guidance of Zahi Hawass—director of Egypt’s Supreme Council of

Overview

Mysterious boy king Tutankhamun returns to the U.S. in 2008, bringing rare treasures never before seen outside Egypt. For the millions of fans wanting a keepsake and chronicle of this magnificent new exhibition, this book will delight. Created by world-renowned art historians under the guidance of Zahi Hawass—director of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities and a well-known media personality—it surveys 3,000 years of ancient Egyptian history by focusing on the lives and lifestyles of great pharaohs. Master photographer Sandro Vannini spotlights every dazzling artifact, using an innovative technique that makes the image jump off the page. The book’s design echoes the exhibition, grouping objects representing family life, religious practices, funerary rituals, and gold. In each artifact—a queen’s eye makeup container, a likeness of a princess eating duck, a sarcophagus made for a prince’s cat—we glimpse the life of ancient Egyptian royalty: exotic and fascinating, yet so human. Gold gleams in a leopard-mask of gilded wood, a brilliant pendant bearing tiny goddesses, even the golden finger and toe covers of Tutankhamun himself, meant to protect his extremities in the afterlife. Featuring more than 120 treasures, a dozen evocative landscape and archaeology photos, and illuminating text, this book makes palpable the excitement, riches, and mysteries of ancient Egypt. It will be prominently displayed in all exhibition venues, and its contents will interest visitors to the show as well as Tut enthusiasts across the country.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Brilliant photography of the mysterious Boy King, Tutankhamun, will move this book off the shelves. Then the riveting first-hand account of archeology will keep students turning the pages. Author Zahi Hawass has the credentials to say, "I know how English archeologist Howard Carter must have felt when he discovered the stairway leading to the tomb on a November morning in 1922." Hawass is an Egyptian and an archeologist. He has made his own discoveries in the tombs of ancient kings, though none so astounding as the hidden grave of Tutankhamen. In a very personal account of the love of the Egyptian dessert, Hawass explains that he wanted to be like Carter, so he left the hotels and went to the desert at night, visualizing what the digs were like in the 1920s when Tutankhamen was discovered. "I wandered until dawn. I could feel the magic of the shadows that surrounded me and sense the mysteries that were still hidden from view." With his personal interpretations of this foreign ground, the history of Tutankhamun becomes a page-turner of a book instead of a dry history. Hawass discusses the discovery of Tutankhamun, and then gives a history of Eygpt before Tutankhamen came to power. The next chapters deal with Tutankhamun's rule and his mysterious death. Finally Hawass addresses the changes ancient Egypt saw after King Tut died. With many quality photos and well-thought-out captions, the book moves quickly through the sixty-two pages of text. Back matter includes a time line of ancient Egyptian history, an index, and a listing of more books to read. 2005, National Geographic, Ages 8 to 12.
—Amy S. Hansen
School Library Journal
Gr 3-7-Hawass, director of excavations at the Giza pyramids and head of Egypt's archaeological council, turns his attention to a perennial topic of curiosity. Combining scholarship and personality, he nimbly offers a solid summary, some of it necessarily conjectural, of the complex and controversial 18th dynasty in which Tut lived and avoids "dry history" by interjecting himself at times into the story. He recalls, for example, the beginnings of his own fascination with his country's history and surmises how Tut and his young wife might have felt at various times in their lives. Likewise, he examines the theory that Tut was murdered, including his own part in a CT scan of the king's mummy in early 2005 and concluding that the evidence points away from murder. The up-to-date nature of Hawass's text will not long matter, of course, but the accompanying photographs are timeless. Black-and-white shots from the past join rich color photographs that almost glow. Especially marvelous is a stunning re-creation, employing current reconstructive techniques, of what Tut might have looked like. If Hawass's style occasionally seems intrusive, this is a minor quibble in what is primarily a first-rate investigation enriched by beautiful artwork.-Coop Renner, Hillside Elementary, El Paso, TX Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780792283553
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
06/14/2005
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
9.15(w) x 10.26(h) x 0.41(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Zahi Hawass, one of the foremost Egyptian archaeologists, is known throughout the world for his contributions to the understanding and preservation of Egypt’s heritage. Among his most important discoveries are the Tombs of the Pyramid Builders at Giza and the Valley of the Golden Mummies in the Bahariya Oasis. Recently he led the team that identified the lost mummy of Queen Hatshepsut and, in 2005, he conducted a CT scan of Tut’s mummy. In 2006, he was chosen by Time magazine as one of the world’s 100 Most Influential People.

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