A Tutorial Guide to Mechanical Desktop 5 Powerpack : An Introduction to Modeling for Engineering Design / Edition 1

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Overview

This tutorial provides a step-by-step introduction to the 3D modeling process and Mechanical Desktop 5, a powerful parametric 3D modeler for desktop computers. Novice modelers as well as those who have experience with AutoCAD or another 2D CAD program will experience the power of Mechanical Desktop as they complete parts assemblies, and drawings for two complete projects. Early tutorials gets students started quickly with basic part modeling and drawing creation, then reinforce these basics as students progress with more advanced modeling activities that introduce part modification, assembly modeling, working drawings, intelligent models using design variables, and using the model for visualization and analysis. Optional sections also introduce the use of Mechanical Desktop 5's Power Pack features for standard parts. This guide's learn-by-doing approach will help anyone who wants to get started with Mechanical Desktop 5, and is perfect for independent study or for use in an engineering graphics or 3D modeling course.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130291493
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 6/8/2001
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 406
  • Product dimensions: 7.99 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Table of Contents

(NOTE: Each chapter begins with Objectives and concludes with Command Summary and Exercises.)
Getting Started with Mechanical Desktop.

Introduction to the Tutorials. Configuring Windows for Mechanical Desktop. Mechanical Desktop Configuration for Tutorials. Microsoft Windows and Mechanical Desktop. Interacting with Mechanical Desktop. Mechanical Desktop Online Help. Working with Documents. Exiting Mechanical Desktop.

1. The Mechanical Desktop Workspace.
Overview of the Tutorials. Introduction to Parametric Modeling. Launch Mechanical Desktop. The Mechanical Desktop Workspace. The Browser and Parametric Modes. File Management and Save As. Making Changes in a Parametric Model/Assembly. Controlling Your View. Named Views. Clipping. Shading Modes. Toggle Shaded/Wireframe. Printing a Rendered View.

2. Simple Part Creation.
Introduction to Part Modeling. Starting a New Part File. First Decisions for Solid Models. Using 2D Sketching Commands. Creating a Profile. Constraining the Profile: Geometric First. Creating a Feature from a Sketch. Setting Properties in the Browser Window. Selecting a New Sketch Plane. Creating a Profile for the Second Feature. Adding a Colinear Constraint. Using List. Extruding a Feature with Join. Renaming Features. Projecting Sketch Geometry. Adding Placed Features. Modifying Features.

3. Making a Drawing.
Starting. Paper Space. Printer Area. Adding Multiple Views. Improving Drawing Appearance. Layers. Changing theText Style. Dimension Styles. Tolerances. Setting the Current Dimension Style. Adjusting Views. Pictorial Drawing Views. Editing Views. Printing Your Drawing. Bidirectional Associativity. Creating Layout2. Creating a Template File.

4. More Part Modeling.
Useful Commands for the Sketcher. Using Mirror. Using Erase. Using Hot Grips. Using Crossing to Select. Making the Profile. Extruding the Base Feature. Work Features. Sketching the Front View. Construction Lines. Using Dimension Command Options. Intersecting the Feature. Removing Material with an Extruded Cut. Sketching the Center Block with Rectangle. Adding the Holes. Adding a Work Plane for Assembly.

5. Modifying Parts.
Parent-Child Relationships. Investigating a Model. Redefining the Model: Editing a Feature. Redefining the Model: Editing a Profile. Using Undo with Parts. Reordering Features. Adding a New Feature. Creating a Pattern Feature. Using Feature Suppression.

6. Creating Revolved Parts and More Part Editing.
Setting Up the Modeling Environment. Sketching the Stopper Part. Revolving the Profile. Creating the Pin Part. Editing a Sketch to Append New Geometry. Object Snap Overrides. Starting a New Part from an Existing One. Editing a Feature. Adding a Work Axis. Creating the Bolt. Using Polygon. Using Dimension Option: Angle, Align, Placement. Changing the Default Extrusion Direction. Adding the Chamfer.

7. Creating an Assembly.
Launching Mechanical Desktop 5 Power Pack. Starting a New Assembly. Assembling the Jack Parts. The Assembly Catalog. Assembly Constraints. Editing Constraints. Inserting the Bolt. Adding Stock Parts (Power Pack). Viewing the Assembly. Analyzing the Model. Activating and Editing a Part. Mass Properties. Localizing the Assembly's Parts.

8. Working Drawings from Models & Assemblies.
Starting. Creating a Layout for the Assembly Drawing. Exploded Assembly Drawing. Adding a Parts List. Adding a Shaded Image. Dimensioned Part Drawing. Notes. Moving a Drawing View. Specifying Tolerance. Adding a Section View.

9. “Smarter” Parts & Better Assemblies.
Using a Part Template. Sweeping the Side Rail. Using Equations in Dimensions. Creating a Smart Assembly. Modeling a Local Part within the Assembly. Creating a New Instance of a Local Part. Creating the Tray Part. Shelled Features. Exporting a Local Part. Adding the Caster Subassembly.

10. Getting Results from Your Intelligent Assembly.
Table-Driven Parts. Creating Active Part Design Variables. Creating a Table-Driven Part. Changing the Sketch to Use the Design Variables. Displaying a Table-Driven Part Configuration. Defining Global Design Variables. Creating a Table-Driven Assembly. Editing a Table of Variables. Mass Properties.

Appendix A. Command Reference.
Appendix B. Glossary.
Index.
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Preface

Preface

This tutorial guide provides a step-by-step introduction to the 3D modeling process and Mechanical Desktop 5, a powerful parametric 3D modeler for desktop computers. Novice modelers, as well as those who have experience with AutoCAD or another 2D CAD program, will experience the power of Mechanical Desktop as they complete parts, as3emblies, and drawings for two complete projects. Early tutorials get students started quickly with basic part modeling and drawing creation, then reinforce these Basics as students progress with more advanced modeling activities that introduce part modification, assembly modeling, working drawings, intelligent models using design variables, and using the model for visualization and analysis. Optional sections also introduce the use of Mechanical Desktop 5's Power Pack features for standard parts.

Written for independent student use in the lab portion of a beginning engineering graphics course or in an introductory 3D modeling course, this guide's learn-by-doing approach will be useful to anyone who wants to get started using Mechanical Desktop 5 in the context of the modeling tasks encountered in engineering design.

Proven Tutorial Approach

Using a tutorial approach developed and refined for teaching AutoCAD, this manual guides students through the creation and assembly of two complete projects as they follow step-by-step instructions to learn commands and techniques. As students progress,individual steps for common actions are no longer provided, so students can apply what they have learned by completing sequences on their own. Each tutorial activity encourages students to relate the commands and techniques they are learning to the modeling process. Information about Mechanical Desktop is presented in a need-to-know fashion that makes it easy to remember. Tips and shortcuts are included where appropriate to help students become efficient and proficient Mechanical Desktop users. Help Reference boxes identify and locate topics in Mechanical Desktop's on-line Help where students can find more information for fixture projects. A Command Summary makes it easy to review and use the tutorials as a reference. Each tutorial concludes with exercises that allow students the opportunity to practice their skills with interesting and realistic models.

Key Features

  • Step-by-step tutorials written for the novice user
  • Introductory chapter on configuring Mechanical Desktop for use with these tutorials
  • Procedures follow and reinforce good modeling practice for engineering design
  • Tips that anticipate common problems and offer suggestions for efficient practice
  • Help References that identify and locate key topics in Mechanical Desktop Help
  • Reference boxes refer students to discussion of graphics concepts in optional companion text, Engineering Design Communication.
  • Challenging end-of-tutorial exercises keyed to the skills presented so far
  • Command Summaries at the end of each tutorial and as a reference in the back of the book
  • Glossary of modeling and Mechanical Desktop terminology

Overview of the Tutorials

Tutorials 1 through 3 introduce students to the basic components of parametric modeling: parts, assemblies, and drawings. Students become familiar with the 3D environment, tools for visualization, the basic sketching and modeling process, and making and printing a drawing as they complete the first part of the jack assembly.

Tutorials 4 through 8 broaden this introduction with more techniques for modeling parts, assembling parts in an assembly, and creating drawings to document the assembly. Students learn more about sketching techniques and drawing aids, create revolved parts, pattern features, and placed features, and learn how to investigate and modify models created by someone else. By Tutorial 7, all of the parts for the jack have been modeled so students can use them to as they learn to apply assembly constraints. After completing the assembly, student prepare an exploded view, examine mass properties of the assembly, and learn to document their assembly by preparing working drawings of the jack assembly and one of the parts. Students learn to create a parts fists and section view, how to add a raster image to their drawing, and good dimensioning practice.

In Tutorials 9 and 10, students create a second assembly and use techniques for making intelligent parts and assemblies, and for getting information from the model. As they model the stock cart, students learn to make swept and shelled features, work with subassemblies, use equations in dimensions, and use design variables to create configurations of table-driven parts.

Requirements

The instructions in this guide assume the student will be using Mechanical Desktop 5 for Windows® 98/2000 or NT. Mechanical Desktop 5 with Power Pack is used in Tutorials 7 and 8, but these sections are optional and the tutorials can be completed without Power Pack. Any configuration instructions are written for students using Mechanical Desktop in a computer lab setting as well as for those working at home or work.

Data files for the tutorials—and related information about the text—may be found at www.prenhall.com/lockhart.

For students of introductory engineering graphics, reference boxes throughout this guide point to more information about modeling and design practice in Engineering Design Communication, a companion text that provides a broad introduction to graphics for engineering design, also available from Prentice Hall. These references are designed to link the modeling exercises in this manual to the graphics concepts covered in the text, but are not required for completion of the tutorials.

Prentice Hall offers discounts when you purchase this book with several other Prentice Hall textbooks. Discounts range from 10-20% off the price of two books separately. To request more specific pricing information, get isbn's for ordering bundles, and learn more about Prentice Hall's offerings in graphics or CAD, either contact your Prentice Hall sales rep, go to http://www.prenhall.com/ and choose AutoCad/ Engineering Graphics/Drafting, or email engineeringCprenhall.com. For the name and number of your sales representative, please contact Prentice Hall Faculty Services at 1-800-526-0485.

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Mark Perkins for working with us to fine-tune and illustrate 1is guide and for the many excellent exercises he prepared and modeled. We would so like to acknowledge the many hundreds of engineering students at Montana State University, whose enthusiasm for 3D modeling inspired us and whose desire to "get to the modeling" helped us balance the explanations with the hands-on activities in this aide.

We would like to thank the folks at Autodesk, especially Denis Cadu, for assistance with the software. In addition we would like to thank the individuals involved in getting the book in print: Eric Svendsen, Rose Kernan, and many others.

We welcome your comments and encourage you to contact us with your suggestions >r fixture releases of this guide.

Shawna D. Lockhart
lockhart@me.montana.edu
Cindy M. Johnson
cjohnson@seacoast.com

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