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Tutus Aren't My Style [NOOK Book]

Overview

Emma loves lizards and pirates and cowboy boots, so when a package arrives from Uncle Leo, she doesn't know what to do with the ballerina costume inside. "I don't know how to be a ballerina," Emma says. She flops when she should float, she trips when she should twirl, and her music sounds like burping! But when she decides to make her own rules about how to be a ballerina, Emma's style prevails in her triumphant dance debut.
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Overview

Emma loves lizards and pirates and cowboy boots, so when a package arrives from Uncle Leo, she doesn't know what to do with the ballerina costume inside. "I don't know how to be a ballerina," Emma says. She flops when she should float, she trips when she should twirl, and her music sounds like burping! But when she decides to make her own rules about how to be a ballerina, Emma's style prevails in her triumphant dance debut.
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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Emma has lots of energy, and she loves hopping and skipping all around the lush garden with her cat. When Uncle Leo sends her a pink tutu and ballet slippers, she is dismayed and says she doesn't know how to be a ballerina. The mailman tells her, "…you dance like daisies and dandelion fluff!" Emma tries, but she falls into the petunias, trips over the garden gnome, and ends up in the birdbath. A neighbor walking her dogs tells her that ballerinas dance on their tippy-toes. That attempt lands her in the flowers again. Her big brother tells her that ballerinas need violin, harp, and flute music, but all Emma has is a kazoo. Finally, she decides to be her own kind of ballerina, puts her shorts and cowboy boots back on, and plays her kazoo. Uncle Leo arrives in time to see the performance. He says he never pictured her as a ballerina, and that's why he sent her the jungle safari outfit, but the store made a mistake. The simple but expressive illustrations are perfect for the story. The artwork, done in watercolor with images outlined in black ink, is very funny. The garden is cheerful, as are all the people demonstrating ballet steps to Emma. The animals are always up to something, and Emma's futile attempts at being graceful are hilarious. This is a clever and imaginative addition to the long list of picture books telling youngsters to be themselves.—Ieva Bates, Ann Arbor District Library, MI
Kirkus Reviews
Emma, whose immediate literary ancestors include Pippi Longstocking and Eloise, is flamboozled when the mailman brings a package from Uncle Leo and it's a ballerina outfit. Emma's taste runs more to pirate hats and lizards, but she gamely tries to float and flitter, following the advice of the mailman and stuffy Mrs. Gurkin with bumpy results in the out-of-doors. Inside, supplying her own music with a kazoo, she fares little better, but when Uncle Leo arrives she rolls like a tumbleweed, does cartwheels and taps in her cowboy boots. He's delighted-and nonplussed, because he meant to send her a safari outfit! Wilsdorf's watercolor-and-China ink pictures have a lively line, spreading out over double pages and employing sequential vignettes with equal assurance and verve. If the message is a little heavy handed, leaping cats, a peripatetic garden gnome and the red-cowboy-booted Emma's irrepressible bounce lift it up. (Picture book. 4-7)
Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
Emma started her day with catching frogs, roping the cat, and digging for pirate treasure. Then the mailman brought her a box from Uncle Leo. The box was full of something pink, and, when she reached inside, she felt soft, silky stuff: no pirate hat, no lizard. Emma was dismayed to pull out a ballerina outfit. She did not know how to be a ballerina. The mailman offered some suggestions: float like a fairy and flutter like a butterfly. Emma floated into the petunia patch and fluttered into the garden gnome. Mrs. Gurkin stopped with the poodles she was walking to give Emma more advice. She explained that ballerinas moved with elegance and grace. Emma took off her red boots and replaced them with the dainty dancing slippers, but standing on her toes caused her to flop and topple. When her brother told her she needed music, Emma played her kazoo. After she exchanged the tutu and slippers for her shorts and cowboy boots, Emma had a good time tapping her feet and cartwheeling. Uncle Leo loved her performance and then asked her how she liked the jungle outfit he had sent. The costume company had made a mistake in the shipment. The cartoonlike illustrations featuring the colorful characters and important props on white backgrounds add to the humor. It is a fun read aloud with an important theme. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101499627
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 12/14/2010
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: NOOK Kids
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • File size: 13 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author


Linda Skeers lives in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Anne Wilsdorf lives in Switzerland.

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