TV China: A Reader on New Media

Overview

If radio and film were the emblematic media of the Maoist era, television has rapidly established itself as the medium of the "marketized" China and in the diaspora. In less than two decades, television has become the dominant medium across the Chinese cultural world. TV China is the first anthology in English on this phenomenon. Covering the People's Republic, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora, these 12 original essays introduce and analyze the Chinese television industry, its programming, the policies...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $17.10   
  • New (8) from $18.29   
  • Used (4) from $17.10   
Sending request ...

Overview

If radio and film were the emblematic media of the Maoist era, television has rapidly established itself as the medium of the "marketized" China and in the diaspora. In less than two decades, television has become the dominant medium across the Chinese cultural world. TV China is the first anthology in English on this phenomenon. Covering the People's Republic, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora, these 12 original essays introduce and analyze the Chinese television industry, its programming, the policies shaping it, and its audiences.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Choice

"... The book's content certainly helps to fill in cracks and crannies of Chinese television studies, for which readers will be thankful..." —Choice, July 2009

China Quarterly
"[This] volume has succeeded in filling a number of gaps, most notably in bringing together within one volume various approaches to the study of Chinese television as a cultural phenomenon that is at once national, transnational, and diasporic. It is a welcome addition to the field, and students and researchers of Chinese media, culture and society, as well as television studies academics in general, should find the book a very useful reference." —Wanning Sun, China Quarterly, 199 Sept. 2009

— Wanning Sun

The China Journal

"TV China provides us with a timely and comprehensive compilation of writings on Chinese television. By presenting the regional dynamics of Chinese television production and reception, Ying Zhu and Chris Berry provide a broad canvas enriched by contemporary media theory.... In summary, this is a fine collection, and will become a benchmark for students and researchers of Chinese media." —The China Journal, No. 63, Jan. 2010

Lisa Rofel

"Fills an important gap in both Chinese studies and media studies." —Lisa Rofel, University of California, Santa Cruz

John Downing

"There is nothing currently comparable in English, and quite possibly in any language." —John Downing, Southern Illinois University

J. A. Lent

Zhu (CUNY, Staten Island) and Berry (Goldsmiths College, Univ. of London, UK) pull together 12 disparate papers on television in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the diaspora. Offering broad perspectives on television practice, circulation, and consumption, the book is structured around four large issues: institutional factors, e.g., political economics, government policy and censorship, trade protection, and corporate policy; programming, especially Shanghai's Documentary Channel, a Taiwanese drama serial, and a popular New Year's Eve variety show; reception, including cultural impacts and viewership patterns; and globalism. The book's content certainly helps to fill in cracks and crannies of Chinese television studies, for which readers will be thankful... -CHOICEJ. A. Lent, Temple University, July 2009

China Quarterly - Wanning Sun

"TV China is a very welcome addition to the limited number of major works dedicated to this topic. To varying degrees and adopting diverse approaches, individual contributors have updated and expanded our current knowledge of Chinese television...the volume has succeeded in filling a number of gaps, most notably in bringing together within one volume various approaches to the study of Chinese television as a cultural phenomenon that is at once national, transnational and diasporic. It is a welcome addition to the field, and students and researchers of Chinese media, culture and society, as well as television studies academics in general, should find the book a very useful reference." —Wanning Sun, China Quarterly, Sept. 2009

From the Publisher
"Fills an important gap in both Chinese studies and media studies." —Lisa Rofel, University of California, Santa Cruz

"There is nothing currently comparable in English, and quite possibly in any language." —John Downing, Southern Illinois University

Zhu (CUNY, Staten Island) and Berry (Goldsmiths College, Univ. of London, UK) pull together 12 disparate papers on television in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the diaspora. Offering broad perspectives on television practice, circulation, and consumption, the book is structured around four large issues: institutional factors, e.g., political economics, government policy and censorship, trade protection, and corporate policy; programming, especially Shanghai's Documentary Channel, a Taiwanese drama serial, and a popular New Year's Eve variety show; reception, including cultural impacts and viewership patterns; and globalism. The book's content certainly helps to fill in cracks and crannies of Chinese television studies, for which readers will be thankful... -CHOICEJ. A. Lent, Temple University, July 2009

Choice

"... The book's content certainly helps to fill in cracks and crannies of Chinese television studies, for which readers will be thankful..." —Choice, July 2009

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253220264
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 1/28/2009
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Ying Zhu is Associate Professor of Cinema Studies in the Department of Media Culture, City University of New York, Staten Island.

Chris Berry is Professor of Film and Television Studies in the Department of Media and Communication at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents

Introduction Ying Zhu and Chris Berry

Part 1. Institution
1. Toward Television Regionalization in Greater China and Beyond Joseph M. Chan
2. CCTV in the Reform Years: A New Model for China's Television? Junhao Hong, Yanmei Lü, and William Zou
3. Hong Kong Television: Same as It Ever Was? Karin Gwinn Wilkins

Part 2. Programming
4. Shanghai Television's Documentary Channel: Chinese Television as Public Space Chris Berry
5. Made in Taiwan: An Analysis of Meteor Garden as an East Asian Idol Drama Hsiu-Chuang Deppman
6. Ritual, Television, and State Ideology: Rereading CCTV's 2006 Spring Festival Gala Xinyu Lu

Part 3. Reception
7. Mediation Journalism in Chinese Television: Double-Time Narrations of SARS Haiqing Yu
8. Building a Chinese "Middle Class": Consumer Education and Identity Construction in Television Land Janice Hua Xu
9. Chinese Television Audience Research Tongdao Zhang

Part 4. Going Global
10. Hong Kong Television and the Making of New Diasporic Imaginaries Amy Lee
11. Globalizing Television: Chinese Satellite Television outside Greater China Cindy Hing-Yuk Wong
12. Transnational Circulation of Chinese-Language Television Dramas Ying Zhu

Appendix: Relevant Milestone Events in the Development of Chinese Television
List of Contributors
Index

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)