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Tweedlioop

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Overview

Question: When is a squirrel not a squirrel? Answer: When it's a most unexpected form of alien visitor. Stanley Schmidt's tale of First Contact will make you smile -- and make you think.

After Bill Nordstrom's house goes up in flames, killing his wife and child, he goes on a solitary hiking trip to Alaska, trying to escape his feelings of guilt and loss. But his attempt to get away from it all puts him right in the middle of a planetary ...
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Tweedlioop

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Overview

Question: When is a squirrel not a squirrel? Answer: When it's a most unexpected form of alien visitor. Stanley Schmidt's tale of First Contact will make you smile -- and make you think.

After Bill Nordstrom's house goes up in flames, killing his wife and child, he goes on a solitary hiking trip to Alaska, trying to escape his feelings of guilt and loss. But his attempt to get away from it all puts him right in the middle of a planetary crisis when he encounters a traveler who has journeyed a much greater distance, and has likewise barely survived a terrible accident.

An exciting, suspenseful and inspiring tale of danger, betrayal, and the lifesaving power of love—even love between beings from two different worlds!
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Editorial Reviews

Science Fiction Chronicle
“When a young adventurer rescues a squirrel-like animal from a pack of wolves in Alaska, he has no idea what he has let himself in for. The creature is an alien visitor, and his relatives are very anxious to recover him . . . . Well told. . . certainly Schmidt’s most controlled and successful novel.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780970971128
  • Publisher: Fox Acre Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/2002
  • Pages: 184
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.06 (h) x 0.52 (d)

Meet the Author

Stanley Schmidt was born in Cincinnati and graduated from the University of Cincinnati in 1966. He began selling stories while a graduate student at Case Western Reserve University, where he completed his Ph.D. in physics in 1969. He continued freelancing while an assistant professor at Heidelberg College in Ohio, teaching physics, astronomy, science fiction, and other oddities. (He was introduced to his wife, Joyce, by a serpent while teaching field biology in a place vaguely resembling that well-known garden.) He has contributed numerous stories and articles to original anthologies and magazines including Analog, Asimov’s, Fantasy & Science Fiction, Rigel, The Twilight Zone, Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine, American Journal of Physics, Camping Journal, Writer’s Digest, and The Writer. He has edited or coedited about a dozen anthologies.
Since 1978, as editor of Analog Science Fiction and Fact, he was nominated 34 times for the Hugo award for Best Professional Editor, and won in 2013 for Best Editor, Short Form. He is or has been a member of the Board of Advisers for the National Space Society and the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame, and has been an invited speaker at national meetings of those organizations, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the American Association of Physics Teachers, as well as numerous museums and universities. In his writing and editing he draws on a varied background including extensive experience as a musician, photographer, traveler, naturalist, outdoorsman, pilot, and linguist. Most of these influences have left traces in his five novels and short fiction. His nonfiction includes the book Aliens and Alien Societies: A Writer’s Guide to Creating Extraterrestrial Life-Forms, and The Coming Convergence: The Surprising Ways Diverse Technologies Interact to Shape Our World and Change the Future, and hundreds of Analog editorials, some of them collected in Which Way to the Future? He was Guest of Honor at BucConeer, the 1998 World Science Fiction Convention in Baltimore, and has been a Nebula and Hugo award nominee for his fiction.

In September 2012, he retired from editing Analog (after a longer run than any previous editor, including John W. Campbell), and now anticipates doing more of his own writing, as well as many of the other things mentioned above.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 10, 2010

    Tweedlioop: The Squirrel From Space

    Tweedlioop is definitely a product of the 80's. It was written then, and it reflects that decade. This somewhat strange story about a man who finds a space alien while backpacking is both cute and funny, but also reflects a bit of social commentary about human beings in general, and our willingness to help people, or beings we know nothing about. And while the main story is about a middle class human helping a lost and injured cute little alien, the subplots about family and loss ground the main character and those around him in reality. This book very much feels like it could happen, its written to feel like an event that you might encounter, and the main character makes choices that you really could see an everyday person making. In short, its a great read, cute, funny, with a side of serious politics and thought provoking philosophy. I'd recommend you at least give it a read, if not buy a cheap paperback copy to stick on your shelf.

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