Tweedlioop

Tweedlioop

4.0 1
by Stanley Schmidt
     
 

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He's been tested once, and failed. Now he'd been given a second chance—and every solution would be wrong. When the ship that brought him to Earth crashed and Tweedlioop (not his real name) was the only survivor, he found himself at the mercy of Earth and its inhabitants. Some were kind and understanding: Bill saved him from wolves in the Alaskan wild;…  See more details below

Overview

He's been tested once, and failed. Now he'd been given a second chance—and every solution would be wrong. When the ship that brought him to Earth crashed and Tweedlioop (not his real name) was the only survivor, he found himself at the mercy of Earth and its inhabitants. Some were kind and understanding: Bill saved him from wolves in the Alaskan wild; Danni battled authorities for his custody, and Laurie became his one true friend. They all wanted to help him return to his people. But the US government didn't. They trapped him, to test him, and to hold him hostage. They planned to trade him for the key to his people's stardrive. If his friends could not help him before the ship arrived to rescue him, it would be too late, not just for Tweedlioop but for all of Earth. A funny, charming, suspenseful story of a shipwrecked alien and the girl who loved him.

Editorial Reviews

Science Fiction Chronicle
“When a young adventurer rescues a squirrel-like animal from a pack of wolves in Alaska, he has no idea what he has let himself in for. The creature is an alien visitor, and his relatives are very anxious to recover him . . . . Well told. . . certainly Schmidt’s most controlled and successful novel.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780970971128
Publisher:
Fox Acre Press
Publication date:
04/28/2002
Pages:
184
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.06(h) x 0.52(d)

Meet the Author

Stanley Schmidt was born in Cincinnati and graduated from the University of Cincinnati in 1966. He began selling stories while a graduate student at Case Western Reserve University, where he completed his Ph.D. in physics in 1969. He continued freelancing while an assistant professor at Heidelberg College in Ohio, teaching physics, astronomy, science fiction, and other oddities. (He was introduced to his wife, Joyce, by a serpent while teaching field biology in a place vaguely resembling that well-known garden.) He has contributed numerous stories and articles to original anthologies and magazines including Analog, Asimov’s, Fantasy & Science Fiction, Rigel, The Twilight Zone, Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine, American Journal of Physics, Camping Journal, Writer’s Digest, and The Writer. He has edited or coedited about a dozen anthologies.
Since 1978, as editor of Analog Science Fiction and Fact, he was nominated 34 times for the Hugo award for Best Professional Editor, and won in 2013 for Best Editor, Short Form. He is or has been a member of the Board of Advisers for the National Space Society and the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame, and has been an invited speaker at national meetings of those organizations, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the American Association of Physics Teachers, as well as numerous museums and universities. In his writing and editing he draws on a varied background including extensive experience as a musician, photographer, traveler, naturalist, outdoorsman, pilot, and linguist. Most of these influences have left traces in his five novels and short fiction. His nonfiction includes the book Aliens and Alien Societies: A Writer’s Guide to Creating Extraterrestrial Life-Forms, and The Coming Convergence: The Surprising Ways Diverse Technologies Interact to Shape Our World and Change the Future, and hundreds of Analog editorials, some of them collected in Which Way to the Future? He was Guest of Honor at BucConeer, the 1998 World Science Fiction Convention in Baltimore, and has been a Nebula and Hugo award nominee for his fiction.

In September 2012, he retired from editing Analog (after a longer run than any previous editor, including John W. Campbell), and now anticipates doing more of his own writing, as well as many of the other things mentioned above.

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Tweedlioop 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Raimon_Drake More than 1 year ago
Tweedlioop is definitely a product of the 80's. It was written then, and it reflects that decade. This somewhat strange story about a man who finds a space alien while backpacking is both cute and funny, but also reflects a bit of social commentary about human beings in general, and our willingness to help people, or beings we know nothing about. And while the main story is about a middle class human helping a lost and injured cute little alien, the subplots about family and loss ground the main character and those around him in reality. This book very much feels like it could happen, its written to feel like an event that you might encounter, and the main character makes choices that you really could see an everyday person making. In short, its a great read, cute, funny, with a side of serious politics and thought provoking philosophy. I'd recommend you at least give it a read, if not buy a cheap paperback copy to stick on your shelf.