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Twelfth Night or What You Will
     

Twelfth Night or What You Will

3.7 11
by William Shakespeare, Story Donno Elizabeth (Editor), A. R. Braunmuller (Editor), Brian Gibbons (Editor), Elizabeth Story Donno (Editor)
 

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The Bard's original poetic phrases are printed side-by-side and line-by-line with the modern translation on each facing page. While Shakespeare's immortal plays have endured, the English language has changed -- which is why today's students often find Shakespeare's idiom difficult to comprehend.

Overview

The Bard's original poetic phrases are printed side-by-side and line-by-line with the modern translation on each facing page. While Shakespeare's immortal plays have endured, the English language has changed -- which is why today's students often find Shakespeare's idiom difficult to comprehend.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'The combination of careful scholarship emphasising the inspiration and excitement of the theatrical experience, with the freshly edited text, should make this one of the most useful new texts of Twelfth Night.' Theatre Journal
School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-These series titles aim to make the Bard's words accessible via free-prose adaptations. The formulaic retellings convey the plot lines of two popular comedies, but all evidence of his poetic genius is missing. Instead, modern slang expressions and/or cliches, such as Toby Belch's complaining of Olivia's "mooching around gloomy rooms" and Andrew's dancing "like a drunken flamingo," replace Shakespeare's more fluid language, trivializing his words. The characters are all included, introduced through pictures at the beginning of each volume, but all but the two main ones remain completely two-dimensional, and the relationships among them are unclear. This is particularly true in Much Ado, a complicated story with incidental characters whose purpose in the play is difficult to discern. For instance, Conrad and Borachio suddenly appear, but there is little sense as to why they are part of the plot against Claudio. The cartoon watercolor renderings, alternating between black-and-white and color, vary from quarter- to half-page in size and suggest the style used by animators. Thus, while they do reinforce the stories, there is a sameness among them, adding to the lack of character development. In fact the characters' images could be interchanged, even between plays, without much confusion. These books are no substitute either for the originals or even for Marchette Chute's classic Stories from Shakespeare (World, 1956; o.p.).-Nancy Menaldi-Scanlan, LaSalle Academy, Providence, RI Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
This volume reprints the Bevington edition of the play along with relevant documents and illustrations, arranged by theme. The texts include facsimiles of period documents, maps, woodcuts, descriptions of the popular customs associated with the play, anti-theatrical tracts, royal proclamations concerning dress, texts on household economics, passages from a Puritan conduct book, excerpts from Ovid and Montaigne, a range of opinions about boy actors, and theories of laughter. The documents contextualize the audience for Shakespeare's play, some of his sources, and competing ideas about music, religion, laughter, and sex. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521296335
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
01/01/1985
Series:
New Cambridge Shakespeare Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
174
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.43(d)

Meet the Author

Widely esteemed as the greatest writer in the English language, William Shakespeare (1564-1616) was an actor and theatrical producer in addition to writing plays and sonnets. Dubbed "The Bard of Avon," Shakespeare oversaw the building of the Globe Theatre in London, where a number of his plays were staged, the best-known of which include Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and Macbeth. The First Folio, a printed book of 36 of his comedies, tragedies, and history plays, was published in 1623.

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Twelfth Night, or What You Will 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She waited.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She got the bedding and the moss with water an the borage and the fresh mouse and thyme an a stick ready for Moongaze.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book for teens to read
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The twelfth night was a pretty good book. It has some pretty good fight scenes, and their is this guy really funny because he sings some funny songs. It's another book written by shakespeare. Their is some parts in the book that are really boring, but towards the middle and the end where it starts to pick up. The book is basically story about a man that is trying to be with girl and his father won't let him. So I guess it's also a love story because he tries to with his dad to let him marry this that he loves so much.