Twelve (Winnie Years Series)

Twelve (Winnie Years Series)

4.5 447
by Lauren Myracle, Jen Taylor
     
 

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The New York Times bestselling author Lauren Myracle is back for another year of ups and down's with Eleven's fabulous Winnie

Winnie Perry went through a lot when she was eleven, from shifting friendships to her teenage sister's mood swings. But now that Winnie is twelve, and one step closer to being a teenager herself--there is so much more to deal with. Will

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Overview


The New York Times bestselling author Lauren Myracle is back for another year of ups and down's with Eleven's fabulous Winnie

Winnie Perry went through a lot when she was eleven, from shifting friendships to her teenage sister's mood swings. But now that Winnie is twelve, and one step closer to being a teenager herself--there is so much more to deal with. Will her new friendship with Dinah last? Can she handle the pressures of junior high? And, most important, will Winnie survive bra shopping (in public!) with Mom?

Editorial Reviews

The count-up saga of preteen Winnie Perry continues. When last seen, Winnie was straddling 11; now she's advanced to the much more adult fields of 12. But her new wisdom hasn't exactly relieved her of anxiety. She worries about the resiliency of her new friendship with Dinah and the prospect of surviving junior high; she also frets over shopping for bras with Mom. A compassionate look at a young girl growing up.
Publishers Weekly
In the sequel to Lauren Myracle's Eleven (a "lighthearted and well-observed novel," according to PW), Twelve, Winnie experiences many of the hallmarks of adolescence--including junior high, getting her ears pierced, shopping for a bra, dealing with menstruation and a first crush. (Dutton, $15.99 208p ages 10-up ISBN 978-0-525-47784-6; Mar.) Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal

Gr 5-7
In Lauren Myracle's sequel (Dutton, 2007) to Eleven (Dutton, 2004), Winnie Perry shares her most personal thoughts during the year she turned 12 and started seventh grade in her suburban community. Each month-by-month episode features Winnie, her friends, and her family. It also presents well-selected junior high school crises that middle-school girls will easily relate to such as bra shopping, periods, boys, and friendship issues. Jen Taylor narrates this first-person account with just the right tone, making it obvious when Winnie is rolling her eyes in disgust or speaking in that "whatever" tone listeners will recognize. She gives each character a unique voice. Tween girls will relate to the rites of passage that Winnie faces in this realistic look at teen life. Myracle's "Internet Girls" series, for students in grades 8 to 11, will be the perfect step up as tween listeners mature.-Jane P. Fenn, Corning-Painted Post West High School, NY

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439023375
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/01/2007
Series:
Winnie Years Series
Edition description:
Unabridged
Pages:
4
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 6.84(h) x 1.03(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt


THE THING ABOUT BIRTHDAYS, especially if you just that very day turned twelve, is that you should make a point of trying to look good. Because twelve is almost thirteen, and thirteen is a teenager, and teenagers don’t strut around with holes in their jeans and ketchup on their shirts.

Well. They did if they were my sister, Sandra, who was fifteen-about-to-turn-sixteen. Her birthday comes next month, which meant that for a delightful three-and-a-half-week period beginning today, she was only three years older than me, instead of four. Yes!

Sandra made a show of not caring about her appearance, although it was clear she secretly did. She stayed in the bathroom far longer than any human needed to, and I knew she was in there staring and staring and staring at herself in the mirror: putting on eyeliner and then wiping all but the barest trace of it off; dabbing on the tiniest smidge of Sun Kissed Cheek Stain from the Body Shop; making eyes at herself and dreaming about Bo, her boyfriend, who told her he liked her just the way she was—natural. So ha ha, the trick was on Bo, but I’ve learned from Sandra that boys were often like that: clueless, but not necessarily in a bad way. When I am fifteen, I’ll probably have a boyfriend, and I’ll probably be just like Sandra. I’ll want to look pretty, but not like I’m trying.

But today was my birthday, not Sandra’s, and I felt like pulling out all the stops. Dressing up usually felt dumb to me—I left that to snooty Gail Grayson and the other sixthgrade go-go girls—but I had a tingly special-day feeling inside. Plus, we were leaving in half an hour for my fancy birthday dinner at Benihana’s. Bo was going to meet us there, and so was Dinah, my new best friend. Although it still felt weird calling her that.

I tugged my lemon yellow ballerina skirt from the clippy things on the hanger and wrapped it around my waist. I threaded one tie through the hole at the side, then swooped it around and knotted it in place. When Mom bought this skirt for me six months ago, she had to show me how to make it work, and I’d found it impossibly complicated. Not anymore.

A full-length mirror hung on the inside of my closet door, and I twirled in front of it and watched the fabric swish around my knees. I had scabs from Rollerblading and a scrape from exploring a sewage pipe, but who cared? I could be beautiful and tough. I refused to buff away the calluses on my feet, too. Mom said a girl’s feet should be soft, but I said, “Uh, no.” I was proud of my calluses. I’d worked hard for them. Summer was right around the corner, and I wasn’t about to wince my way across the hot concrete when I went to the neighborhood pool. Flip-flops were for wimps. For me, it’s barefoot all the way.

I rifled through my clothes until I found my black tank top. Sleek and sophisticated—yeah. People would think I was from New York instead of Atlanta. But when I wiggled into it, I realized something was wrong. It was tight—as in, really tight. I flexed my shoulder blades forward and then backward, trying to loosen things up. Then forward and backward again. But what I saw in the mirror was bad. With my herky-jerky shoulders, I looked like a chicken. With breasts.

“Mo-o-om!” I called. “We’ve got a problem!”

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What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

“Light, quick reading with an authentic perspective.”—Kirkus Reviews

Meet the Author


Lauren Myracle is the author of Eleven, Twelve, Thirteen, TTYL,TTFN, Kissing Kate, and the recently published How to Be Bad. She is a NY Times bestselling author and her books have received the following honors: ALA Best Books for Young Adults, ALA Quick Picks for Reluctant Readers, and New York Public Library Books for the TeenAge. She holds a MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults from Vermont College. Lauren lives in Colorado with her husband and three children.

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