Twelve Terrible Things

Twelve Terrible Things

5.0 1
by Marty Kelley
     
 

At last, a grown-up brings to light some of the awful, horrible things kids must endure. A brother's smelly socks, a jump off the high-dive, or a sloppy kiss from a great-aunt—hey, childhood isn't without peril. In-your-face graphic paintings paired with droll text will have readers chuckling and sympathizing. Reviews

 "This is essentially

Overview

At last, a grown-up brings to light some of the awful, horrible things kids must endure. A brother's smelly socks, a jump off the high-dive, or a sloppy kiss from a great-aunt—hey, childhood isn't without peril. In-your-face graphic paintings paired with droll text will have readers chuckling and sympathizing. Reviews

 "This is essentially Gary Greenberg'­s Pop-Up Book of Phobias (1999) but with a wonderful sense of how kids sometimes feel the world treats them. Expect this book to be a hit with not just younger children but their older teenage siblings as well. Turns the terrible into the terrific."-Kirkus Reviews

 

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
After a warning to readers about the "terrible things" within the book, Kelley presents a double-page view, as seen by the reader, of each of 12 of life's awful moments. We look down at our shoes as, "Oooopsie!" There goes the ice cream out of our cone. "There's nothing under the bed�" but tentacles rise before our eyes. The dentist looms over us, pick in hand. An elderly relative or friend comes at us, fingers ready, saying "�just look at those cheeks." And so we suffer, through a nightmare birthday party, through being the new student the class looks at warily, a miserable car ride, sending the dead goldfish down the toilet, the scary view from the top of the high-diving board, etc. There is a reward, however, at the end. The front end pages show hands with pencil writing the note of warning; the back pages have the server at the ice cream counter delivering a cone to replace the one lost in the beginning. Each "terrible" happening stands alone. Naturalistic watercolors with the few words of text set in large type shock mildly but include fun in perspective. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

Gr 1-4

This book begins with a letter to readers: "I'm warning you. If you turn the page, you are going to see some terrible things." What follows are a dozen situations that range from unpleasant to downright awful, the stuff of nightmares for children everywhere. Realistic, double-page watercolor illustrations use a clever first-person perspective to render readers the victims of horrors such as a cheek-pinching lady, an over-the-top birthday clown, and a hairy-moled lunch lady who doesn't understand that less is more when it comes to "Industrial Strength" gravy. Another scene shows hands gripping tightly to a too-high diving board, the swimming pool looking tiny below, while a voice puts on the peer pressure, "Come on already...JUMP!" Minimal text and detailed artwork combine to convey a macabre humor that is bound to ensnare even the most hesitant of readers.-Madeline Walton-Hadlock, San Jose Public Library, CA

Kirkus Reviews

"I'm warning you.�If you turn the page, you are going to see some terrible things." No exaggeration there. Twelve childhood fears, anxieties and worries are rendered in hugely realistic two-page spreads. The book begins with readers looking down at a delicious double-scoop of ice cream lying heartbreakingly on the ground; they'll experience each horrible happening firsthand, from the dizzying view from the edge of a diving board to a friend's smelly sock thrust in their faces. The 12 everyday bad things are delightfully exaggerated: When Grandma reaches for "those cheeks," she looks positively predatory. After the 12th terrible thing occurs, readers find themselves in an ice-cream store reaching for a double-scoop cone, and the cycle begins again. This is essentially Gary Greenberg's Pop-Up Book of Phobias (1999) but with a wonderful sense of how kids sometimes feel the world treats them.�Expect this book to be a hit with not just younger children but their older teenage siblings as well. Turns the terrible into the terrific. (Picture book. 5-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582462295
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
10/28/2008
Pages:
30
Product dimensions:
10.60(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

MARTY KELLEY has written and illustrated seven children's books from his studio in New Boston, New Hampshire. He has been a second grade teacher, a drummer in a heavy metal band, a baker, a cartoonist, a newspaper art director, a balloon delivery guy, an animator, and more. Now Marty spends most of his time writing and painting.

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Twelve Terrible Things 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
toddler-teacher More than 1 year ago
Twelve Terrible Things is just that. Things that happen to you as a child that you will not like. The children at my school ask me to read it every day. They love it!!