Twelve Who Ruled: The Year of the Terror in the French Revolution. (With a new preface) / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 92%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (37) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $50.00   
  • Used (36) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$50.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

The years 1793 and 1794 marked the Reign of Terror of the French Revolution, a bloody period characterized by the brutal repression of those suspected of being counterrevolutionary. The so-called Committee of Public Safety, which directed the Terror, ordered 2,400 executions in July 1794 in Paris alone, and across France 30,000 people lost their lives. R. R. Palmer's Twelve Who Ruled is the classic study of the twelve men who made up the committee, the most famous of whom was Robespierre. Palmer approached each man as an individual, describing and explaining his inner motivations and dramatically portraying his revolutionary role. In addition, he saw the Committee of Public Safety as the prototype of modern dictatorships and the Reign of Terror as an early incarnation of the totalitarian state.

Palmer's other great classic, also from Princeton, is his Age of the Democratic Revolution: A Political History of Europe and America, 1760-1800 in two volumes (vol. 1, The Challenge, 1959; vol. 2, The Struggle, 1964), for which Palmer received the prestigious Bancroft Prize in 1960. Palmer's key idea was that a single great democratic revolution against an entrenched aristocracy swept Western culture between 1760 and 1800, and that the American Revolution was the most important single event in precipitating this revolutionary era. These two volumes have been of singular significance for historians on both sides of the Atlantic and together with his Twelve Who Ruled established Palmer as one of the most important historians of his generation.

This modern classic is being reissued in recognition of the bicentennial of the French Revolution.

From a review of an earlier edition: "This is wholly an admirable book: it is based upon all the most recent researches and itself makes some original contributions to scholarship; it is written in a bright popular style and deserves as warm a welcome from the general reader as from the historian."—A.J.P. Taylor, Manchester Guardian

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Both professionals and amateurs will be tempted by the vibrant touch that has created a warm and understanding narrative."—Journal of Modern History
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691007618
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/1970
  • Edition description: Bicentennial ed
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 432
  • Product dimensions: 5.39 (w) x 8.44 (h) x 1.04 (d)

Meet the Author

R. R. Palmer (1909-2002) was Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University and a guest scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study. Isser Woloch is Moore Collegiate Professor of History at Columbia University.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations vi
Foreword to the Princeton Classic Edition vii
Preface to the Bicentennial Edition xvii
I Twelve Terrorists to Be 3
II The Fifth Summer of the Revolution 22
III Organizing the Terror 44
IV The Beginning of Victory 78
V The "Foreign Plot" and 14 Frimaire 108
VI Republic in Miniature 130
VII Doom At Lyons 153
VIII The Missions to Alsace 177
IX The Missions to Brittany 202
X Dictated Economy 225
XI Finding the Narrow Way 254
XII Ventose 280
XIII The Culmination 305
XIV The Rush Upon Europe 335
XV The Fall 361
Epilogue 388
Bibliographical Essay 397
Index 405
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 12, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Revolution!

    Twelve Who Ruled studied the French Revolution, specifically the Reign of Terror. In order to deal with the difficult situation: invasion, civil war, starvation among other problems that France was facing at the time, the National Convention created the Committee of Public Safety, a group of twelve men who ruled France. They also issued some laws that were intended to save France from falling into ruin along with the revolution. The levée en masse was created as a mean to defend the nation from foreign invaders, and to clamp down on rebellions of its own people. During the fifth year of revolution France was at war with every main nation in Europe except Russia. It was being attacked from all directions, and rebellions broke out within its territory as well. The revolutionary uprising in the Vendée executed approximately two thousand people, and Nantes, prisoners of the revolt were drowned in the Loire. The Committee of General Security was created and the Law of Suspects established against people suspected of counter-revolutionary activity. However this law did not define clearly what a suspect was, since based on the law anybody could be accused of being a traitor. Since the beginning of the revolution, the different political groups were not united, there were differences between and within groups, and that's why the foreign plot increased the number of people executed and in prison. In an attempted to end the inflation, the operations of speculators and profiteers, the demands of impoverished masses and to allow the flow of food supply, the General Maximum set a maximum price for articles of prime necessity and maximum wage. Nevertheless this policy was a complete failure. Such was the necessity for supplies during the revolution that people who tried to take advantage of the bad economy such as grain holders ended up in the guillotine. It is true that the most urgent need was food, but it was not the only one; it was also a shortage in copper, coal and gunpowder as well. Many historians consider that September 5 is the day when the terror began because the army took the offensive. On this same date a group marched to the Common House to demand the government to take action against shopkeepers, aristocrats and tyrants. The lack of food and the supposed foreign plot only made things worse because it increased the fear and suspicions among people. As a result in less than two years the victims of the terror reached around forty thousand people; among the executed there were holders, some generals that lose wars, anyone who support the Allies or was part of a civil war. The terror was designed to fight the enemies of the revolution, yet most the victims were lower class people. The Reign of Terror had a significant impact to the French Revolution.

    I relate to this book because I have a great interest in history, specially when it's about Revolutions that have occurred in many different countries. I find it interesting to learn about past, and present governments that have made people stand up for what they believe. Most of this things explain how ambitious some people can become and what the can do in order to obtain what they want, protect what they love/believe, and how this can start wars among cities, countries, and people. In my own country there have been protests against the government, and its corruption.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)