Twelve Years a Slave: Includes Six Additional Slave Narratives (Uncle Tom's Cabin, Frederick Douglass)

Twelve Years a Slave: Includes Six Additional Slave Narratives (Uncle Tom's Cabin, Frederick Douglass)

by Solomon Northup, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth
     
 
Twelve Years a Slave And Six Other Slave Narratives

Included Books:

Twelve Years a Slave
Uncle Tom�s Cabin
Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Northern Slave
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
My Bondage and My Freedom
Up From Slavery
The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The

Overview

Twelve Years a Slave And Six Other Slave Narratives

Included Books:

Twelve Years a Slave
Uncle Tom�s Cabin
Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Northern Slave
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
My Bondage and My Freedom
Up From Slavery
The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African

This collection includes a table of contents for easy navigation.
Included are links to free audiobook versions for 6 of the 7 books.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940149260607
Publisher:
Classic Book Bundles
Publication date:
04/23/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Information on Solomon Northup (from Wikipedia):
Solomon Northup (July 1808�1863?) was an American and the primary author of the memoir Twelve Years a Slave. A free-born African American from New York, he was the son of a freed slave and a free woman of color. A farmer and violinist, Northup owned land in Hebron, New York. In 1841 he was kidnapped by slave traders, having been enticed to Washington, D.C. (where slavery was legal) with a job offer as a violinist with traveling entertainers. Shortly after he and his employers arrived in DC, they sold him as a slave, apparently having drugged him into unconsciousness to effect the kidnapping. He was shipped to New Orleans where he was sold to a planter in Louisiana. He was held in the Red River region of Louisiana by several different owners for 12 years, mostly in Avoyelles Parish. Aside from a brief communication when he was first kidnapped, his family and friends had no knowledge of him. He attempted to get word to them and to regain his freedom, but the systems guarding slaves were too pervasive to allow it. Eventually, he confided in a Canadian working on his plantation, who opposed slavery and was willing to risk contacting Northup's family and friends. They enlisted the help of the Governor of New York, Washington Hunt, to his cause, since state law provided for aid to free New York citizens kidnapped into slavery. Northup regained his freedom on January 3, 1853 and returned to his family in New York.

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