Twenties Talk:The Unpaved Road of Life After College

Overview

Mike Harmon, a few years removed from college, is struggling with the difficult transition from college to the real world. He has less time to do the things he wants. He isn't meeting new people. And he hates his boring desk job.

When a strange quirk of fate knocks Mike for a loop, he realizes that he can't go on like this. He has to make a change—not only in his career, but also in his fundamental philosophy on life. But how? And to what?

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More About This Book

Overview

Mike Harmon, a few years removed from college, is struggling with the difficult transition from college to the real world. He has less time to do the things he wants. He isn't meeting new people. And he hates his boring desk job.

When a strange quirk of fate knocks Mike for a loop, he realizes that he can't go on like this. He has to make a change—not only in his career, but also in his fundamental philosophy on life. But how? And to what?

Routine workdays, happy hour banter and nights on the town give way to a seemingly innocent weekend trip with his brothers in Las Vegas, landing Mike an unforeseen opportunity to test his fate in a way that he would never have previously considered. Will Mike take the plunge in the hope of altering his destiny, even if it could land him in yet a deeper hole, or will he step in line with convention and play it safe?

With original and entertaining dialogue, Twenties Talk captures the true psyche of today's twenties male. Weaving though the many facets of modern twenties life—dating, work, sports, gambling, travel, and family—Twenties Talk takes the reader on a hilarious journey along the roller coaster ride of life after college. A must for all twenty some things, Twenties Talk is a sure bet.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780595241934
  • Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 8/15/2002
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 180
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.41 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2002

    If you're anywhere near your twenties, you should really read this book...

    This is a really impressive first book by the author. As a twentysomething myself, I feel like I am suddenly part of a very strange world (dot.com collapse, economic woes, 9/11), and certainly share the existential angst that I recognize in many people in my generation (at least those people who are struggling with discovering what life (careers, relationships, friendships, family) is about, a typical twentysomething dilemma which has been exaggerated by the particularities of our time). Without preaching or pontificating, Twenties Talk captures all the feelings and fears of post-millenium young adulthood, but it does so with a comic and thoughtful edginess that keeps the pages turning. The book doesn't slam its point over your head, but it definitely makes clear that it is meant to address the basic twentysomething dilemma. In my mind, the book has three parts. The first part is a basic comedy/parody of the life of the average 20s male. This part is pure comedy. The author hits it on the proverbial nose. The parties, the girls, the drinking, the meaningless days at work. I especially liked his detailed description of a typical workday and how all us dot.com dropouts generally managed to find ways (e.g. IMing, surfing the net, bull****ing around the watercooler, etc.) to accomplish as little as possible - hilarious, but subtly poignant (to my mind, the trademark characteristics of the author¿s writing style). In the second part, the main character is frontally confronted by the issues of the day during a trip with his brothers to Las Vegas. A little more slow going and thoughtful than the first part, this segment of the book considers how to deal with the big questions, meanwhile weaving in the exact type of conversations that persist among every group of twentysomething guys around the country. Levy totally succeeds in capturing the mindset of the twentysomething male. If you like the Sports Guy on ESPN.com (Bill Simmons), you'll love this part of the book. The chapter that really did it for me compares the Ring in the Lord of the Rings trilogy with the TV remote control. Pure genius. The final part is a much needed denouement. Even though the book maintains a comical aspect throughout, the author found a way to punctuates his story with significance and meaning. It all comes together, and Levy reminds us all what life is really about, whether you're twenty, forty or seventy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2002

    Touring the 20.com personality

    Michael Levy's book, although short, hits home in a comical but penetrating manner. It brings forth the confusion of the 20's personality who have benefited from so much that they have a hard time finding the true direction in their lives. At the same time in a unique perspective of male-female relationships, the author, in a tongue in cheek manner, equates dating to football and further ampifies the social scene that I am sure many of the young people feel today. However, the final portion of the book brings home the reality of life, family, and the values that are passed on in life. Mr. Levy has a fresh feel to his work and perhaps although not eloquent, the usage of metaphors and symbolism is quite interesting. I hope to see a sequal to this book and topic soon.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2002

    an incredible first effort

    Levy brings it. That is really all that needs to be said. To borrow an twenties-talk-esque analogy some people like to pick up bands before they make it big, others see a talented football player who is underrated and champion them throughout their impressive career...Levy is an author that will make it. The book is a fun read, what it may lack in length it makes up for in entertainment. A bit disjointed at times (and I defy most first efforts not to be), the book maintains a witty and fresh perspective on life in the twenties. I would argue that while the experiences may not be yours...most of it just about anyone will be able to relate to, or at best be able to relate someone they know to it. Buy it! Enjoy it!

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