Twenty-six Princesses: An Alphabet Story

Twenty-six Princesses: An Alphabet Story

by Dave Horowitz
     
 

The Prince may be a frog, but that's not going to stop these lively lasses from attending the ball. Starting with Princess Alice (who's first to the palace) all the way through Princess Zaire, these girls show that getting there can be half the fun. Full of vibrant, witty details, this frog's-eye view of palace life is a colorful way to learn the alphabet.See more details below

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Overview

The Prince may be a frog, but that's not going to stop these lively lasses from attending the ball. Starting with Princess Alice (who's first to the palace) all the way through Princess Zaire, these girls show that getting there can be half the fun. Full of vibrant, witty details, this frog's-eye view of palace life is a colorful way to learn the alphabet.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Twenty-six princesses go to meet the frog prince in his palace; thus, Horowitz can show a different princess and pithy rhyme for each letter of the alphabet. From "Princess Alice, First to the palace," through "Princess Flo, Waiting to go" and "Princess Grace, Making a face" all the way to "Princess Zaire. Finally there," each has a distinct personality and story. Then, "Put them all together and what do you get? A royal pain in the alphabet!" Horowitz meets the challenge of theme and variation in this delightful visual romp, presenting a different female, frog, context, and caption in each image. He mixes media, shamelessly borrows images from art like Botticelli's Venus, includes impolite actions like passing gas, and generally has fun. Each gal has her own colorfully-bordered page, and the final double-page spread puts all of them together with passing frogs in delightful pandemonium. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2- From "Princess Alice./First to the palace" to "Princess Zaire./Finally there," 26 enthusiastic young royals head to a castle where they have been invited to meet the prince. Each page sports a princess, one for each letter of the alphabet, introduced with a brief rhyming verse and a vibrant cartoon illustration. Adding to the fun is the fact that the prince and all of the other supporting characters are frogs. Horowitz has a light, witty touch, and the text is rich with puns. The words and the pictures play off one another perfectly, encouraging children to pore over each humorously detailed portrait. For example, "Princess Flo./Waiting to go," shows a girl, arms crossed and scowling, sitting in a broken-down carriage, while a perplexed-looking frog, garbed in a mechanic's outfit, stares at a wrench and another holds an instruction sheet ("How to Fix a Wheel"). Princess Nell ("What is that smell?") looks embarrassed after emitting several small pink gas clouds ("toot"), while two frogs, a monk and a knight, react to the odor. When all of the guests finally arrive, the prince isn't sure what he's gotten himself into: "Put 'em all together/and what do you get?/A royal pain in the alphabet!" Packed with child appeal, this offering is appropriate for sharing aloud or for independent perusal.-Anne Parker, Milton Public Library, MA

Kirkus Reviews
A frog prince lets it be known that he's "receiving," and 26 applicants respond, from Princess Alice ("First to the palace") on through the rest of the letters. The text is all one-line captions. As they make their way successively into the Prince's presence, each of the lasses-variously dressed and with a variety of hair and skin colors-displays an aggressive, larger-than-life personality in the big, comical cartoon portraits. Often they pair off; Princess Heather is "dressed for the weather," but plainly furious Princess Isabella "has no umbrella," for instance, and Princess Xena is "a true ballerina," but clumsy Princess Yvette "isn't one, yet." The royal visits aren't all daintiness and good manners, either; Princess Ruth is "mithing a tooth," Princess Criss isn't the only one who tries to "steal a kiss" and pink clouds floating behind Princess Nell ("What is that smell?") signal alimentary issues. Once Princess Zaire is "finally there," Horowitz assembles them all in a boisterous final foldout as "A royal pain in the alphabet!" Young readers and listeners of both sexes will laugh and agree. (Picture book. 5-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142415368
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
04/14/2011
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
479,922
Product dimensions:
8.82(w) x 9.74(h) x 0.09(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

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