Twenty Wishes (Blossom Street Series #6) [NOOK Book]

Overview


What do you want most in the world?

What Anne Marie Roche wants is to find happiness again. At thirty-eight, she's childless, a recent widow, alone. She owns a successful bookstore on Seattle's Blossom Street, but despite her accomplishments, there's a feeling of emptiness.

On Valentine's Day, Anne Marie and several other widows get together to celebrate…hope. They each begin a list of twenty wishes—things ...

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Twenty Wishes (Blossom Street Series #6)

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Overview


What do you want most in the world?

What Anne Marie Roche wants is to find happiness again. At thirty-eight, she's childless, a recent widow, alone. She owns a successful bookstore on Seattle's Blossom Street, but despite her accomplishments, there's a feeling of emptiness.

On Valentine's Day, Anne Marie and several other widows get together to celebrate…hope. They each begin a list of twenty wishes—things they always wanted to do but never did.

Anne Marie's list includes learning to knit, falling in love again, doing good for someone else. When she volunteers at a local school, an eight-year-old girl named Ellen enters her life. It's a relationship that becomes far more involving—and far more important—than Anne Marie had ever imagined.

As Ellen helps Anne Marie complete her list of twenty wishes, they both learn that wishes can come true…but not necessarily in the way you expect.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Macomber returns to Seattle's fictional Blossom Street of A Good Yarn (and others) for a hopeful tale of four widows who meet at 38-year-old Anne Marie Roche's bookstore. Separated from her husband after he refused to have a baby with her, Anne Marie felt certain they would reconcile-until he suddenly died. Lillie Higgins lost her husband in the same plane crash that claimed the husband of their daughter, Barbie Foster. Elise Beaumont entered widowhood after cancer claimed her husband. Together, the four make life-fulfillment wish lists. With Elise's prodding, Anne Marie decides to fulfill one of her wishes-do good for someone else-and becomes a "lunch buddy" to an at-risk third grader. Anne Marie, meanwhile, must deal with the reappearance of her adult stepdaughter, Melissa, who always held her in disdain. Elise mainly serves as a catalyst for Anne Marie's journey, but there is plenty of focus on Lillian and Barbie, who find purpose in unexpected and difficult relationships. Though stilted dialogue can pull readers out of the moment, Macomber's assured storytelling and affirming narrative is as welcoming as your favorite easy chair. (May)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781459246867
  • Publisher: MIRA
  • Publication date: 6/15/2012
  • Series: Blossom Street Series , #6
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 13,256
  • File size: 671 KB

Meet the Author

Debbie Macomber

Debbie Macomber, with more than 100 million copies of her books sold worldwide, is one of today's most popular authors. The #1 New York Times bestselling author is best known for her ability to create compelling characters and bring their stories to life in her books. Debbie is a regular resident on numerous bestseller lists, including the New York Times (70 times and counting), USA TODAY (currently 67 times) and Publishers Weekly (47 times). Visit her at DebbieMacomber.com.

Biography

Publishing did not come easy to self-described "creative speller" Debbie Macomber. When Macomber decided to follow her dreams of becoming a bestselling novelist, she had a lot of obstacles in her path. For starters, Macomber is dyslexic. On top of this, she had only a high school degree, four young children at home, and absolutely no connections in the publishing world. If there's one thing you can say about Debbie Macomber, however, it is that she does not give up. She rented a typewriter and started writing, determined to break into the world of romance fiction.

The years went on and the rejection letters piled up. Her family was living on a shoestring budget, and Debbie was beginning to think that her dreams of being a novelist might never be fulfilled. She began writing for magazines to earn some extra money, and she eventually saved up enough to attend a romance writer's conference with three hundred other aspiring novelists. The organizers of the conference picked ten manuscripts to review in a group critique session. Debbie was thrilled to learn that her manuscript would be one of the novels discussed.

Her excitement quickly faded when an editor from Harlequin tore her manuscript to pieces in front of the crowded room, evoking peals of laughter from the assembled writers. Afterwards, Macomber approached the editor and asked her what she could do to improve her novel. "Throw it away," the editor suggested.

Many writers would have given up right then and there, but not Macomber. The deeply religious Macomber took a lesson from Job and gathered strength from adversity. She returned home and mailed one last manuscript to Silhouette, a publisher of romance novels. "It cost $10 to mail it off," Macomber told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in 2000. "My husband was out of work at this time, in Alaska, trying to find a job. The children and I were living on his $250-a-week unemployment, and I can't tell you what $10 was to us at that time."

It turned out to be the best $10 Macomber ever spent. In 1984, Silhouette published her novel, Heartsong. (Incidentally, although Heartsong was Macomber's first sale, she actually published another book, Starlight, before Heartsong went to print.) Heartsong went on to become the first romance novel to ever be reviewed in Publishers Weekly, and Macomber was finally on her way.

Today, Macomber is one of the most widely read authors in America. A regular on the New York Times bestseller charts, she is best known for her Cedar Cove novels, a heartwarming story sequence set in a small town in Washington state, and for her Knitting Books series, featuring a group of women who patronize a Seattle yarn store. In addition, her backlist of early romances, including several contemporary Westerns, has been reissued with great success.

Macomber has made a successful transition from conventional romance to the somewhat more flexible genre known as "women's fiction." "I was at a point in my life where I found it difficult to identify with a 25-year-old heroine," Macomber said in an interview with ContemporaryRomanceWriters.com. "I found that I wanted to write more about the friendships women share with each other." To judge from her avid, ever-increasing fan base, Debbie's readers heartily approve.

Good To Know

Some outtakes from our interview with Macomber:

"I'm dyslexic, although they didn't have a word for it when I was in grade school. The teachers said I had 'word blindness.' I've always been a creative speller and never achieved good grades in school. I graduated from high school but didn't have the opportunity to attend college, so I did what young women my age did at the time -- I married. I was a teenager, and Wayne and I (now married nearly 37 years) had four children in five years."

"I'm a yarnaholic. That means I have more yarn stashed away than any one person could possibly use in three or four lifetimes. There's something inspiring about yarn that makes me feel I could never have enough. Often I'll go into my yarn room (yes, room!) and just hold skeins of yarn and dream about projects. It's a comforting thing to do."

"My office walls are covered with autographs of famous writers -- it's what my children call my ‘dead author wall.' I have signatures from Mark Twain, Earnest Hemingway, Jack London, Harriett Beecher Stowe, Pearl Buck, Charles Dickens, Rudyard Kipling, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, to name a few."

"I'm morning person, and rip into the day with a half-mile swim (FYI: a half mile is a whole lot farther in the water than it is on land) at the local pool before I head into the office, arriving before eight. It takes me until nine or ten to read through all of the guest book entries from my web site and the mail before I go upstairs to the turret where I do my writing. Yes, I write in a turret -- is that romantic, or what? I started blogging last September and really enjoy sharing bits and pieces of my life with my readers. Once I'm home for the day, I cook dinner, trying out new recipes. Along with cooking, I also enjoy eating, especially when the meal is accompanied by a glass of good wine. Wayne and I take particular pleasure in sampling eastern Washington State wines (since we were both born and raised in that part of the state).

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    1. Hometown:
      Port Orchard, Washington
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 22, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Yakima, Washington
    1. Education:
      Graduated from high school in 1966; attended community college
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt




It was six o'clock on Valentine's Day, an hour that should have marked the beginning of a celebration—the way it had when she and Robert were married. When Robert was alive. But tonight, on the most romantic day of the year, thirty-eight-year-old Anne Marie Roche was alone. Turning over the closed sign on the door of Blossom Street Books, she glanced at the Valentine's display with its cutout hearts and pink balloons and the collection of romance novels she didn't read anymore. Then she looked outside. Streetlights flickered on as evening settled over the Seattle neighborhood.

The truth was, Anne Marie hated her life. Well, okay, hate was putting it too strongly. After all, she was healthy, reasonably young and reasonably attractive, financially solvent, and she owned the most popular bookstore in the area. But she didn't have anyone to love, anyone who loved her. She was no longer part of something larger than herself. Every morning when she woke, she found the other side of the bed empty and she didn't think she'd ever get accustomed to that desolate feeling.

Her husband had died nine months ago. So, technically, she was a widow, although she and Robert had been separated. But they saw each other regularly and were working on a reconciliation.

Then, suddenly, it was all over, all hope gone. Just when they were on the verge of reuniting, her husband had a massive heart attack. He'd collapsed at the office and died even before the paramedics could arrive.

Anne Marie's mother had warned her about the risks of marrying an older man, but fifteen years wasn't that much older. Robert, charismatic and handsome, had been in his mid-forties when they met. They'd been happy together, well matched in every way but one.

Anne Marie wanted a baby.

Robert hadn't.

He'd had a family—two children—with his first wife, Pamela, and wasn't interested in starting a second one. When she'd married him, Anne Marie had agreed to his stipulation. At the time it hadn't seemed important. She was madly in love with Robert—and then two years ago it hit her. This longing, this need for a baby, grew more and more intense, and Robert's refusal became more adamant. His solution had been to buy her a dog she'd named Baxter. Much as she loved her Yorkie, her feelings hadn't changed. She'd still wanted a baby.

The situation wasn't helped by Melissa, Robert's twenty-four-year-old daughter, who disliked Anne Marie and always had. Over the years Anne Marie had made many attempts to ease the tension between them, all of which failed. Fortunately she had a good relationship with Brandon, Robert's son, who was five years older than his sister.

When problems arose in Anne Marie and Robert's marriage, Melissa hadn't been able to disguise her glee. Her stepdaughter seemed absolutely delighted when Robert moved out the autumn before last, seven months before his death.

Anne Marie didn't know what she'd done to warrant such passionate loathing, other than to fall in love with Melissa's father. She supposed the girl's ardent hope that her parents would one day remarry was responsible for her bitterness. Every child wanted his or her family intact. And Melissa was a young teen when Anne Marie married Robert—a hard age made harder by the family's circumstances. Anne Marie didn't blame Robert's daughter, but his marriage to Pamela had been dead long before she entered the picture. Still, try as she might, Anne Marie had never been able to find common ground with Melissa. In fact, she hadn't heard from her since the funeral.

Anne Marie opened the shop door as Elise Beaumont approached. Elise's husband, Maverick, had recently passed away after a lengthy battle with cancer. In her mid-sixties, she was a retired librarian who'd reconnected with her husband after nearly thirty years apart, only to lose him again after less than three. She was a slight, gray-haired woman who'd become almost gaunt, but the sternness of her features was softened by the sadness in her eyes. A frequent patron of the bookstore, she and Anne Marie had become friends during the months of Maverick's decline. In many ways his death was a release, yet Anne Marie understood how difficult it was to let go of someone you loved.

"I was hoping you'd come," Anne Marie told her with a quick hug. She'd closed the store two hours early, giving Steve Handley, her usual Thursday-night assistant, a free evening for his own Valentine celebration.

Elise slipped off her coat and draped it over the back of an overstuffed chair. "I didn't think I would and then I decided that being with the other widows was exactly what I needed tonight."

The widows.

They'd met in a book group Anne Marie had organized at the store. After Robert died, she'd suggested reading Lolly Winston's Good Grief, a novel about a young woman adjusting to widowhood. It was through the group that Anne Marie had met Lillie Higgins and Barbie Foster. Colette Blake had joined, too. She'd been a widow who'd rented the apartment above A Good Yarn, Lydia Goetz's yarn store. Colette had married again the previous year.

Although the larger group had read and discussed other books, the widows had gravitated together and begun to meet on their own. Their sessions were often informal gatherings over coffee at the nearby French Café or a glass of wine upstairs at Anne Marie's.

Lillie and Barbie were a unique pair of widows, mother and daughter. They'd lost their husbands in a private plane crash three years earlier. Anne Marie remembered reading about the Learjet incident in the paper; both pilots and their two passengers had been killed in a freak accident on landing in Seattle. Lillie's husband and son-in-law were executives at a perfume company and often took business trips together.

Lillie Higgins was close to Elise's age, but that was all they shared. Actually, it was difficult to tell exactly how old Lillie was. She looked barely fifty, but with a forty-year-old daughter, she had to be in her mid-sixties. Petite and delicate, she was one of those rare women who never seemed to age. Her wardrobe consisted of ultra-expensive knits and gold jewelry. Anne Marie had the impression that if Lillie wanted, she could purchase this bookstore ten times over.

Her daughter, Barbie Foster, was a lot like her mother and aptly named, at least as far as appearances went. She had long blond hair that never seemed to get mussed, gorgeous crystal-blue eyes, a flawless figure. It was hard to believe she had eighteen-year-old twin sons who were college freshmen; Anne Marie would bet that most people assumed she was their sister rather than their mother. If Anne Marie didn't like Barbie so much, it would be easy to resent her for being so… perfect.

"Thanks for closing early tonight. I'd much rather be here than spend another evening alone," Elise said, breaking into Anne Marie's thoughts.

There was that word again.

Alone.

Despite her own misgivings about Valentine's Day, Anne Marie tried to smile. She gestured toward the rear of the store. "I've got the bubble wrap and everything set up in the back room."

The previous month, as they discussed an Elizabeth Bu-chan novel, the subject of Valentine's Day had come up. Anne Marie learned from her friends that this was perhaps the most painful holiday for widows. That was when their small group decided to plan their own celebration. Only instead of romantic love and marriage, they'd celebrate friendship. They'd defy the world's pitying glances and toast each other's past loves and future hopes.

Elise managed a quivering smile as she peered into the back of the store. "Bubble wrap?"

"I have tons," Anne Marie informed her. "You can't imagine how many shippers use it."

"But why is it on the floor?"

"Well…" It seemed silly now that Anne Marie was trying to explain. "I always have this insatiable urge to pop it, so I thought we could do it together—by walking on it."

"You want us to step on bubble wrap?" Elise asked, sounding confused.

"Think of it as our own Valentine's dance and fireworks in one."

"But fireworks are for Independence Day or maybe New Year's."

"That's the point," Anne Marie said bracingly. "New beginnings."

"And we'll drink champagne, too?"

"You bet. I've got a couple bottles of the real stuff, Veuve Clicquot."

"Veuve means widow, you know. The widow Clicquot's bubbly—what else could we possibly drink?"

The door opened, and Lillie and Barbie entered in a cloud of some elegant scent. As soon as they were inside, Anne Marie locked the shop.

"Party time," Lillie said, handing Anne Marie a white box filled with pastries.

"I brought chocolate," Barbie announced, holding up a box of dark Belgian chocolates. She wore a red pantsuit with a wide black belt that emphasized her petite waist. Was there no justice in this world? The woman had the figure of a goddess and she ate chocolate?

"I read that dark chocolate and red wine have all kinds of natural benefits," Elise said.

Anne Marie had read that, too.

Lillie shook her head in mock astonishment. "First wine and now chocolate. Life is good."

Leading the way to the back room, Anne Marie dimmed the lights in the front of the shop. Beside the champagne and flutes, she'd arranged a crystal vase of red roses; they'd been a gift from Susannah's Garden, the flower shop next door. All the retailers on Blossom Street were friends. Hearing about the small party, Alix Turner from the French Café had dropped off a tray of cheese, crackers and seedless green grapes, which Anne Marie had placed on her work table, now covered with a lacy cloth. Lydia had insisted they use it for their celebration. It was so beautiful it reawakened Anne Marie's desire to learn to knit.

She wished she could see her friends' gifts as more than expressions of sympathy, but her state of mind made that impossible. Still, because of the other widows, for their sake as well as her own, she was determined to try.

"This is going to be fun," Elise said, telling them why Anne Marie had spread out the bubble wrap.

"What a wonderful idea!" Barbie exclaimed.

"Shall I pour?" Anne Marie asked, ignoring the sense of oppression she couldn't seem to escape. It had been present for months and she'd thought life would be better by now. Perhaps she needed counseling. One thing was certain; she needed something.

"By all means," Lillie said, motioning toward the champagne.

Anne Marie opened the bottle and filled the four glasses and then they toasted one another, clicking the rims of the flutes.

"To love," Elise said. "To Maverick." Her voice broke.

"To chocolate!" Barbie made a silly face, perhaps to draw attention away from Elise's tears.

"And the Widow's champagne," Lillie threw in.

Anne Marie remained silent.

Although it'd been nine months, her grief didn't seem to diminish or become any easier to bear. She worked too much, ate too little and grieved for all the might-have-beens. It was more than the fact that the man she'd loved was dead. With his death, she was forced to give up the dream of all she'd hoped her marriage would be. A true companionship—and the foundation of a family. Even if she were to fall in love again, which seemed unlikely, a pregnancy past the age of forty was risky. The dream of having her own child had died with Robert.

The four sipped their champagne in silence, each caught up in her own memories. Anne Marie saw the sorrow on Elise's face, the contemplative look on Lillie's, Barbie's half smile.

"Will we be removing our shoes in order to pop the bubble wrap?" Lillie asked a moment later.

"Mom has this thing about walking around in stocking feet," Barbie said, glancing at her mother. "She doesn't approve."

"It just wasn't done in our household," Lillie murmured.

"There's no reason to take our shoes off," Anne Marie said. "The whole idea is to have fun. Make a bit of noise, celebrate our friendship and our memories."

"Then I say, let 'er rip," Elise said. She raised her sensibly shod foot and stomped on a bubble. A popping sound exploded in the room.

Barbie went next, her step firm. Her high heels effectively demolished a series of bubbles.

Pop. Pop. Pop.

Pop.

Lillie followed. Her movements were tentative, almost apologetic.

Pop.

Anne Marie went last. It felt… good. Really good, and the noise only added to the unexpected sense of fun and exhilaration. For the first time since the party had begun, she smiled.

By then they were all flushed with excitement and champagne. The others were laughing giddily; Anne Marie couldn't quite manage that but she could almost laugh. The ability to express joy had left her when Robert died. That wasn't all she'd lost. She used to sing, freely and without self-consciousness. But after Robert's funeral Anne Marie discovered she couldn't sing anymore. She just couldn't. Her throat closed up whenever she tried. What came out were strangled sounds that barely resembled music, and after a while she gave up. It'd been months since she'd even attempted a song.

The popping continued as they paraded around on the bubble wrap, pausing now and then to sip champagne. They marched with all the pomp and ceremony of soldiers in procession, saluting one another with their champagne flutes.

Thanks to her friends, Anne Marie found that her mood had begun to lift.

Soon all the bubbles were popped. Bringing their champagne, they sat in the chairs where the reader groups met and toasted each other again in the dimly lit store.

Leaning back, Anne Marie tried to relax. Despite her earlier laughter, despite spending this evening with friends, her eyes filled with tears. She blinked them away, but new tears came, and it wasn't long before Barbie noticed. Her friend placed a reassuring hand on Anne Marie's knee.

"Does it ever hurt any less?" Anne Marie asked.

Searching for a tissue in her hip pocket, she blotted her eyes. She hated breaking down like this. She wanted to explain that she'd never been a weepy or sentimental woman. All her emotions had become more intense since Robert's death.

Lillie and Barbie exchanged knowing looks. They'd been widows the longest.

"It does," Lillie promised her, growing serious, too. "But it takes time."

"I feel so alone."

"That's to be expected," Barbie said, passing her the box of chocolates. "Here, have another one. You'll feel better."

"That's what my grandmother used to say," Elise added. "Eat, and everything will seem better."

"Mine always said I'd be good as new if I did something for someone else," Lillie said. "Grams swore that showing kindness to others was the cure for any kind of unhappiness."

"Exercise helps, too," Barbie put in. "I spent many, many hours at the gym."

"Can't I just buy something?" Anne Marie asked plaintively, and hiccuped a laugh as she made the suggestion.

The others smiled.

"I wish it was that easy," Elise said in a solemn voice.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 248 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(140)

4 Star

(69)

3 Star

(29)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 249 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 8, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellant!!!!!!

    I was introduced to this author by an aquaintence, who gave me "A Good Yarn". I was immediately engrossed in the characters and had to read more. I did a search for this author, realized that I had read the 2nd book in a series and had to get them all!! I really enjoyed the story of friendships between women. All of the series was well written and difficult to put down. Twenty Wishes was one of my first ebooks for my Nook. Debbie Macomber is now one of my favorite authors.

    12 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 8, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Book with great story line. Kept me entertained

    Great Book with great story line. Kept me entertained

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2012

    Amazing story and very realistic

    Its about a few widows who are trying to find love but have trouble letting go of their past! There are also alot of unexpected happenings!!!

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 13, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Cute book, fast read. I like the idea of the twenty wishes, how

    Cute book, fast read. I like the idea of the twenty wishes, how the things on it can be "reach" like a trip to Paris or "fun" like a pair of red cowboy boots. Pure chicklit, don't read if you're looking for a lot of depth.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 29, 2011

    Twenty Wishes

    This is a very good read for someone who has lost a loved one. This book has inspired me to start my own list of Twenty Wishes.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    CD/Unabridged/Fiction: So, I knew by disc two how it was going t

    CD/Unabridged/Fiction: So, I knew by disc two how it was going to end. That was okay, because it was entertaining. It's the story of a group of widows who start a "20 Wishes" club. Ann Marie is the main character that get rooked into fostering a second grader. Her two friends, a mother and daughter (whose spouses died in a plane crash) find love too. The daughter with an angry paraplegic and the mother with a auto service manager. It is a Macomber novel so of course, it's happily ever after.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 18, 2012

    Another Great Read

    Another great book in the Blossom Street Series. Very enjoyable and heartwarming.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 18, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Great book for knitters and non-knitters alike

    Part of the Blossom Street series, this is my first Debbie Macomber book. It did drag significantly in the beginning; I thought I would read my self-required 50 pages before abandoning the book. However, the action picked up and I was happy to finish the tale. Seattleite Ann Marie and several other widows see each other socially quite often and they each make a list of twenty wishes, things they wish for or want to do. It’s difficult for them to come up with the requisite number because some of the things initially written down seem so trivial. Is it ok to wish for things that are self-serving ot do the wishes need to make a bigger impact? Anne Marie begins volunteering at an elementary school and discovers that the little girl with whom she is matched as a lunch buddy may be giving her more than Anne Marie feels she is giving back. A warm, feel-good story that I high recommend. My next read—to start at the beginning of the Blossom Street books.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 14, 2011

    Love it!!!

    Great book - knitters and optimists will love it...

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 29, 2010

    Twenty Wishes

    Great book for someone who has lost a loved one and needs inspiration to live on!Y

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2008

    A reviewer

    Once again Debbie Macomber writes a winner. This is one of my Blossom Street favorites. An easy read, yet it makes you think about making your own list of Twenty wishes!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2014

    Inspiring

    This is a great book. Inspiring for those who have lost someone special. I love the whole idea of 20 wishes!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2012

    i loved this book!! have read it several times--very inspiring

    i loved this book!! have read it several times--very inspiring each time! made my own list of 20 wishes and have been working on them ever since!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2012

    Very entertaining

    Love these Blossom Street Books!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Very cute book

    I really enjoyed this book and the series it self of this book. I can't wait to get the next book. anna marie & Ellen was such good characters that I really enjoyed reading it with them in it. Both of them touched my heart. Debbie Macomber is an excelling writer and I hope she will continue the series of Blossom Street. It's my favorite! You won't be dissapointed with this series!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 2, 2014

    Highly Recommend

    I found myself making my own list of twenty wishes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2014

    To joel

    Beby im getting blockdd!!!!! I cant go!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 25, 2013

    This as well as the rest of the Blossom Street Series are highly recommended.

    I have been reading only Debbie Macomber books since I discovered her a few months ago. Fortunatly she is a prolific writer so I have many more wonderful hours of entertainment reading her books. Don't miss her Cedar Cove Series (which has been shown on the Hallmark Channel).

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  • Posted August 23, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Enjoyed it!

    I like all the blossom street books!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2013

    Trey

    No do supersecret..thats perfect...hardly any on superstat theres been posts

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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