Twigs

Twigs

3.7 4
by Alison Ashley Formento
     
 

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One pint-sized girl. Ten supersized crises. And it's high noon.

Madeline 'Twigs' Henry is a small teen in the shadow of some big problems. Born prematurely, and still so tiny in stature that people think she's in the fifth grade, Twigs has a mighty spirit. She needs that spirit when life throws a bucket of stones at her. It starts with a drunken deserter

Overview

One pint-sized girl. Ten supersized crises. And it's high noon.

Madeline 'Twigs' Henry is a small teen in the shadow of some big problems. Born prematurely, and still so tiny in stature that people think she's in the fifth grade, Twigs has a mighty spirit. She needs that spirit when life throws a bucket of stones at her. It starts with a drunken deserter dad. Mom and little sister are so obsessed with their own love lives that Twigs has to take care of both of them. Her adored soldier brother Matt is suddenly missing in the Middle East. Just as Twigs is trying to figure out how she can solve everybody's problems (and find out if her boyfriend is cheating on her after just one week away at school), the flash of a knife slices her life, and Twigs must stand up to a gang of thugs to try to save the person she loves most--the very father who left her all alone.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"In a charming ... small-town drama, Madeline 'Twigs' Henry navigates family secrets, boyfriend troubles and a friendship with a spirited older woman. The larger-than-life characters and gestures bring humor and action to the story . . . Twigs is a compellingly flawed character, and [her] growth is palpable." --Kirkus Reviews

"Twigs is a unique coming-of-age story with a vivid cast of truly unforgettable characters." --Kieran Scott, author of the He's So/She's So trilogy

"I think there are many teens out there who can relate to at least one or more of the life-changing events that Twigs goes through, whether it's embarking on the scary adventure of going to college or getting used to a new significant other in their parent's life. I found this book to be entertaining and a great summer read." --The Real Bookshelves of Room 918

"Twigs was easy to relate to. I think that we have all had a time in our lives when it felt like everything was falling apart . . . Twigs was so special in a lot of ways . . . over all I found the book to be a nice read." - Daydreamer N's Reviews

"[An] absolutely touching novel.... I enjoyed every bit . . . Alison Ashley Formento really does a great job in knitting together a heart-wrenching and emotional read that perfectly portrays the trials a young girl has to go through to figure out who she really is, and where she fits in this crazy world." --The Young Folks

Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-01
In a charming if sometimes over-the-top small-town drama, Madeline "Twigs" Henry navigates family secrets, boyfriend troubles and a friendship with a spirited older woman. Twigs, given her nickname because of her small size at birth, works at a drug store under the supervision of a foul-tempered slacker named Dink. While running the store by herself, she encounters Helen Raymond, a middle-aged woman whose dramatic reaction to her husband's leaving her involves wailing in an aisle and throwing bottles of hair dye. Twigs' own family circumstances are becoming complicated: Her brother, a soldier stationed in Iraq, goes missing, and her father, an alcoholic who abandoned the family, contacts Twigs and her mother and sister. Twigs therefore finds comfort and empowerment in connecting with Helen. The larger-than-life characters and gestures bring humor and action to the story, but sometimes, they are too exaggerated to be believed. A professor at Twigs' community college is cartoonishly strict, and Twigs' willingness to physically assault Helen's husband and continually refer to his new girlfriend as "his whore" feels oddly out of proportion to the situation. Still, Twigs is a compellingly flawed character, and as her family situation and relationship with her college-freshman boyfriend change, Twigs' growth is palpable. Like many of its characters, imperfect but earnest. (Fiction. 14-18)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440565656
Publisher:
Adams Media
Publication date:
09/18/2013
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
1,082,205
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.10(d)
Lexile:
750L (what's this?)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Alison Ashley Formento's journalism has appeared in the New York Times, The Writer Magazine, and Parenting, and her short stories in Common Ties and Sinner+Saint Press. This is her first novel.

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Twigs 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I woke up to the smell of bacon and eggs. I quickly slid into some clothes and put my favorite baseball cap on. I ran downstairs and found a note on the table "enjoy,ill be home late" that was my moms handwriting. It was only me and my mom who lived here. My dad had died in a car accident years ago.i looked at the breakfast but didnt touch it. It was 7:45 almost time for my bus to be here. I walked outside and standing in my doorway was a red haired women in a black suit."blake?" She asked with a slight italian accent. "Yes" i answered. "I need you to come with me" she said back to me. Then i saw her slide a needle out of her pocket "wait a secon-"i started but got interupted as she stabbed me in the neck and i fell to the ground.-------------thanks for reading. Ill need 3 positive comments to continue
RobertDowns More than 1 year ago
With first person narratives, there’s always the risk that the narrator comes across as unlikeable. Well, Madeline Annette Henry, aka TWIGS, takes unlikeable to a whole new plateau. I hated her with a passion best reserved for anchovies, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, white vinegar, and chlamydia. She’s eighteen with the maturity level of an eight year-old, or maybe we should give her the benefit of the doubt and say her brain capacity matches her size, so she’s a fifth-grader. She stomps like a four year-old, shrills like a six year-old, and rollerblades like a fourteen year-old, and has acquired more than enough immaturity to last her for the rest of her life. Self-centered doesn’t even begin to do her justice. Let’s just stop the universe for Twigs. We should all be gracious enough to kiss her feet, comb her hair, and bask in all of her less than five foot glory. Her warped sense of reality helped escalate this novel into fantasy. With a strong attachment to a father that abandoned her and her family, a strong sense of antipathy to a mother who has moved on with her life, even if it occasionally takes her into the bedroom, and sometimes involves black lace thongs, a strong sense of disregard for her popular cheerleader sister, and hostility for every single one of her mother’s boyfriends, she’s a real prize for your eighteen or nineteen year-old son, just make sure you feed him enough alcohol and roofies to help seal the deal. If she cheats and steals with the same ease she reserves for lying, and elbow smashing, she’ll be forcibly removed from Hinkney Community College and in prison before she’s twenty. There’s a special cell for where she’s going, and she’s one downward spiral away from flitting off into oblivion. In the end, though, the world would be better off without her and her egotistical manner. What she may lack in size she makes up for with her obnoxious and odious demeanor. Enough whores filled this story to take Sin City by storm. The term was handed out more often than Snickers bars at a Mars convention. Despite the number of characters involved in this tale, there didn’t appear to be a sympathetic one amidst this bunch of misfits and miscreants. It reminded me of a couple dozen juvenile delinquents headed for detention on a Saturday afternoon in the middle of winter. The plot moved along like a series of nightmares, or it could always be worse scenarios, but even that particular antidote proved less than satisfying, as I managed to stop caring and start cheering for the end well before the halfway point of this tale. By the end of the novel, I felt like I had witnessed a 20-car pileup on I-25 in the middle of rush hour. A word of advice for Twigs. If you hate your life that much, then you better change it, otherwise you have no one to blame but yourself. Even if the mirror might crack as you spew forth a cantankerous rage that bests even the most prolific two year-old temper tantrums on YouTube. It’s all up to you, or then again, maybe it isn’t. I received this book for free through NetGalley. Robert Downs Author of Falling Immortality: Casey Holden, Private Investigator