Twilight

Twilight

5.0 3
by Elie Wiesel
     
 

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Raphael Lipkin is a man obsessed. He hears voices. He talks to ghosts. He is spending the summer at the Mountain Clinic, a psychiatric hospital in upstate New York—not as a patient, but as a visiting professional with a secret, personal quest.
 
A professor of literature and a Holocaust survivor, Raphael, having rebuilt his life since the war, sees it

Overview

Raphael Lipkin is a man obsessed. He hears voices. He talks to ghosts. He is spending the summer at the Mountain Clinic, a psychiatric hospital in upstate New York—not as a patient, but as a visiting professional with a secret, personal quest.
 
A professor of literature and a Holocaust survivor, Raphael, having rebuilt his life since the war, sees it on the verge of coming apart once more. He longs to talk to Pedro, the man who rescued him as a fifteen-year-old orphan from postwar Poland and brought him to Paris, becoming his friend, mentor, hero, and savior. But Pedro disappeared inside the prisons of Stalin’s Russia shortly after the war. Where is Pedro now, and how can Raphael discern what is true and what is false without him?
 
A mysterious nighttime caller directs Raphael’s search to the Mountain Clinic, a unique asylum for patients whose delusions spring from the Bible. Amid patients calling themselves Adam, Cain, Abraham, Joseph, Jeremiah, and God, Raphael searches for Pedro’s truth and the meaning of his own survival in a novel that penetrated the mysteries of good, evil, and madness.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A masterful storyteller . . . Wiesel creates a kaleidoscope of images that raise tantalizing questions."
—The Boston Globe

From the abyss of the death camps he has come as a messenger to mankind—not with a message of hate and revenge, but with one of brotherhood and atonement.”
—From the Citation for the 1986 Nobel Peace Prize
 
“Wiesel uses words to craft literary monuments, works that stand as acts of remembrance and as meditations on the nature of remembrance itself.”
San Francisco Chronicle
 
“Unquestionably, Wiesel is one of the most admirable, indeed indispensable, human beings now writing.”
Washington Post
 
“Not since Albert Camus has there been such an eloquent spokesman for man.”
The New York Review of Books

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Exploring the painful affinity between life and death, sanity and madness, Nobel Laureate Wiesel draws yet again on the experiences of the Holocaust to provide an answer. At the novel's center is Raphael Lipkin, a professor who, convinced he is going mad, seeks respite from his tortured imaginings in a mental clinic where he is both a temporary staff member, exploring the relationship between madness and prophecy, and a patient. Raphael's family has disappeared into the death camps, but although he speaks to them in his dreams, it is to his absent friend Pedro that he pours out his heart, for whom he searches among the madmen in the sanitarium. Guilt obsesses him, as it must all survivors, but the particularity of his guilt resides in Pedro, who gave his life or his sanity (which for Raphael are the same) in an effort to save Raphael's brother Yoel. Poignant though the recounted suffering must in fact have been, the canvas is too broad for any single player to kindle sympathy, the expression of emotion too overblown to bring tears. Torture, death, the violence of separation are recounted in cliche-ridden prose. Yet a lingering question manages to possess the reader: Is every survivor already half dead? (May)
Library Journal
$18.95. f Raphael Lipkin, a professor of mystical traditions and a Holocaust survivor, comes to the Mountain Clinic to study the relationship between madness and prophecy. He is seeking among these madmen, who believe they are Cain, Abraham, Joseph, the Messiah, some fragmentary truth, some fleeting epiphany. Why did he survive? ``And what about God in all this?'' In this brilliant and powerful interweaving of past and present, dream and vision, fantasy and reality, Wiesel has synthesized his earlierand ever continuingconcerns, journeying from the Holocaust world of his Night and Dawn to the twilight realm of madness, mysticism, and prophecy. Marion Wiesel's translation is perfectly attuned to her husband's absorbing style. Highly recommended. Marcia G. Fuchs, Guilford Free Lib., Ct.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805210583
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/28/1995
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
332,023
Product dimensions:
5.18(w) x 7.96(h) x 0.59(d)

Meet the Author

ELIE WIESEL is the author of more than fifty books, both fiction and nonfiction. He is a recipient of the United States Congressional Gold Medal, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the French Legion of Honor’s Grand-Croix, an honorary knighthood of the British Empire and, in 1986, the Nobel Peace Prize. Since 1976, he has been the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
New York, New York
Date of Birth:
September 30, 1928
Place of Birth:
Sighet, Romania
Education:
La Sorbonne

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Twilight 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LOVE THIS BOOKREAD IT
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