Twilight Of Liberty

( 1 )

Overview

Twilight of Liberty is a sequel to Donohue's highly regarded The Politics of the American Civil Liberties Union, but with a marked change in emphasis. Instead of challenging the ACLU's nonpartisan reputation, as he did in the earlier volume, Donohue now seeks to demonstrate why and how recent ACLU policy undermines the process of liberty. He argues that the ACLU, by relentlessly warring with mediating institutions, and by pushing a radical individualism in its policies, is not ...

See more details below
Paperback (REVISED)
$35.95
BN.com price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $8.27   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Twilight of Liberty is a sequel to Donohue's highly regarded The Politics of the American Civil Liberties Union, but with a marked change in emphasis. Instead of challenging the ACLU's nonpartisan reputation, as he did in the earlier volume, Donohue now seeks to demonstrate why and how recent ACLU policy undermines the process of liberty. He argues that the ACLU, by relentlessly warring with mediating institutions, and by pushing a radical individualism in its policies, is not making us more, but less free.

Two conceptions of liberty are discussed. The first considers the social context in which the struggle for freedom takes place. It maintains that freedom is best achieved through a delicate balancing of individual rights with the legitimate needs of the social order. The other conception of liberty is atomistic, exclusively concerned with the rights of the individual. According to Donohue, such a definition assures the triumph of the state over the mediating institutions of society, thus reducing prospects for freedom.

This is the first book to critically analyze contemporary ACLU policy and to challenge its reputation as the preeminent voice of freedom in the United States. It aims to move beyond the idea that freedom is best served by pushing individual rights to extremes. Twilight of Liberty will appeal to scholars in the fields of law, social policy, and culture. Students in civil liberties courses will also find this book a valuable resource.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Focusing primarily on the past decade, Donohue contends, inter alia, that the ACLU's obsession with individual rights serves to undermine the overall social order and ultimately has the effect of lessening individual freedoms.”
— R. A. Carp, Choice

“Provocative . . . he acknowledges that the ACLU has honorably battled violations of individual rights but he maintains that the group’s fetishization of those rights degrades institutions that help build responsibility and community. . . . His critique is in many instances appropriate.”
—Publisher’s Weekly

“Mr. Donohue makes a detailed and persuasive argument that, far from simply “protecting constitutional freedom the ACLU is driven by an ideology for which the accurate term is extremist. Twilight of Liberty is an important polemical and constructive contribution to understanding law, politics, and morality in contemporary America.”
—The Reverend Richard John Neuhaus, First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life

“William Donohue thoroughly documents and perceptively analyzes both the socially destructive work of the American Civil Liberties Union and the threat to liberty presented by the extremist positions on individual “rights” ACLU propagates. This book is a much-needed antidote to pernicious trends in our national life.”
—Robert H. Bork, American Enterprise Institute

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Following his book, The Politics of the American Civil Liberties Union , which argued that the group was not, as professed, above politics, LaRoche College (Pittsburgh) sociologist Donohue offers a flawed but provocative critique of what he calls the ACLU's ``statism and libertinism.'' He acknowledges that the ACLU has honorably battled violations of individual rights, but he maintains that the group's fetishization of those rights degrades institutions that help build responsibility and community. Donohue raises worthwhile questions about ACLU positions against ``contact tracing'' for HIV, metal detectors in schools and public expressions of religion. He contends that the organization's own practices don't match its support for affirmative action, and finds inconsistency in ACLU views on sexual harassment and campus free speech. He blames the ACLU participation in the deinstitutionalization movement for increasing the numbers of mentally ill homeless people and suggests that the group's defense of teenagers' constitutional rights ignores the claim of inner-city residents that curfews can make their communities safer. Though Donohue argues from the right, many of his contentions echo those of communitarian centrists, and his critique is in many instances appropriate. (Jan.)
Booknews
This work is the sequel to the author's , but with a change in emphasis. Instead of challenging the ACLU's nonpartisan reputation as in the earlier work, Donohue, president of the Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights, seeks to demonstrate how and why recent ACLU policy undermines the process of liberty. He compares a conception of liberty which maintains that freedom is best achieved when individual rights and the needs of the social order are balanced, with a conception of liberty which is concerned solely with the rights of the individual. The original edition was published in 1994. This revised edition contains a new afterword by the author. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765807229
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/15/2006
  • Edition description: REVISED
  • Pages: 396
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Meet the Author

William A. Donohue is president of the Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights in New York City. He taught at both St. Lucy’s School in Spanish Harlem and La Roche College. He is the author of numerous works, including The Politics of the American Civil Liberties Union, The New Freedom, and Secular Sabotage.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Pt. I Mediating Structures and Liberty
1 The Family 21
2 The Schools 63
3 The Churches 93
4 The Private Sector 129
Pt. II The Public Weal
5 Freedom of Expression 169
6 The Homeless 221
7 Crime and Civil Liberties 251
Conclusion: The Radical Cast of Liberty 303
Index 325
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    A REAL EYE-OPENER! Donohue reveals the flawed and often contrad

    A REAL EYE-OPENER! Donohue reveals the flawed and often contradictory positions espoused by the ACLU on issues such as crime, child pornography, private property rights, the homeless, and much more. Case by case, Donohue exposes the ACLU's often bizarre reasoning and its influence on local and national legislation. For example, the ACLU essentially believes that there is an absolute right to disseminate child porn, that gun-toting gang members have a right to take over public parks, and that even convicted murderers should be sentenced to probation because imprisonment violates their rights. What about victims? Apparently, the ACLU thinks there is no such thing as victims' rights under the Constitution. Donohue's documentation is meticulously presented, leaving little room for doubt that the ACLU is indeed undermining the very liberty it espouses to protect. An alarming and revealing look at the ACLU. Highly recommended.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)