The Twin Princes

The Twin Princes

5.0 2
by Tedd Arnold
     
 

Why did Old King Chanticleer worry about his two sons? Because they were twins, and he could not decide which prince should inherit his throne. And so he planned a horse race—one that would determine the next king. But this race was an unusual one: The brother whose horse was last to cross the finish line would be the winner. How in the world could they

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Overview

Why did Old King Chanticleer worry about his two sons? Because they were twins, and he could not decide which prince should inherit his throne. And so he planned a horse race—one that would determine the next king. But this race was an unusual one: The brother whose horse was last to cross the finish line would be the winner. How in the world could they finish this strange race?

With puns on every page, exuberantly goofy artwork, the classic battle of hero versus villain, and even a riddle for the reader to solve, this featherbrained story is terrifically clever fun.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
King Chanticleer, a rooster, has a difficult decision to make: which of his twin sons, Henry or Fowler, should succeed him. Fowler tends to sneer at good-hearted Henry, who puts up with his foul play. The king plans a royal hunt with the princes to help him decide. After he has an accident, Chanticleer announces a horse race to decide who will inherit the throne. That night, while Henry cares for his father, Fowler makes Henry's horse sick, but to everyone's surprise, the king says that the one on the last horse to enter the city will be the next king. Fowler rides off, but Henry must walk his sick horse. At the city gates, neither will go first. When an old woman approaches, giving each a carved horse and rider, Fowler tosses his away, but Henry figures out from his how to win the throne. The story is told by an old woman to two small chicks, with a challenge to readers to solve the riddle. The humor in the story, and in the avian characters, is strong, predicted on the jacket/cover illustrations of the bug-eyed opposing fowls and their galloping race. The "boys" are presented as nasty versus nice; their horses have similar characteristics. Arnold's imaginative words help readers visualize the anthropomorphic characters, medieval castle, and farm folks, creating scenes of comic drama. Colored pencils and watercolor washes create sculptural characters in humorous situations and emotional settings.
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2
Arnold characterizes the good and bad twin princes and their like-minded horses in this featherbrained tale in which Old King Chanticleer decides that his successor will be determined by a horse race and a riddle. Verbal puns—"You crossed the road to help me" and "Last one back is a rotten egg"—gain significance when the cast is made up of players complete with waddles and beaks. Listeners are encouraged to solve the riddle and prompted with visual clues and verbal urging: "Last chance…." Arnold's stylized art with bold outlines, colored-pencil curlicues, and watercolor washes is most recognizable for the expressive googly eyes—something that might be duplicated with golf balls in 3-D. The book is fun, but the nuances might be lost on a young audience.
—Janet S. ThompsonCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803726963
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
04/05/2007
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
643,223
Product dimensions:
10.30(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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