Two from the Vault

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Lindsay Planer
As the title implies, this was the second complete show to be issued from the Grateful Dead's tape vaults. In contradiction of the "technical information" liner notes essay, this release was derived entirely from the second night of a two-night run August 23 and 24, 1968 at the Shrine Theater in Los Angeles. These performances were documented using what was then a state-of-the-art multi-track machine provided and administered by the Dead's record company, Warner Brothers. After being shelved for nearly two-and-a-half decades, the band's longtime sonic gurus Dan Healy and Jeffrey Norman digitally reconstructed and released this aurally accurate and musically motivated ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Lindsay Planer
As the title implies, this was the second complete show to be issued from the Grateful Dead's tape vaults. In contradiction of the "technical information" liner notes essay, this release was derived entirely from the second night of a two-night run August 23 and 24, 1968 at the Shrine Theater in Los Angeles. These performances were documented using what was then a state-of-the-art multi-track machine provided and administered by the Dead's record company, Warner Brothers. After being shelved for nearly two-and-a-half decades, the band's longtime sonic gurus Dan Healy and Jeffrey Norman digitally reconstructed and released this aurally accurate and musically motivated performance. The set list is fairly typical of the band's mid-1968 repertoire. Having just issued their second platter, Anthem of the Sun, a month earlier, the Dead were concentrating fairly heavily on material from that disc -- including most of the first side. The extended "That's It for the Other One" suite is executed with the acidic fury associated with this era of the Grateful Dead. The band is also looking forward to their upcoming projects. These include Aoxomoxa -- their next studio effort -- which contains "Saint Stephen." However, the track appears in the context of their 1969 release, Live/Dead, linked with "Dark Star" on one side and "The Eleven" on the other. Also from the genre-defining double-LP set is "Death Don't Have No Mercy" and "Turn On Your Lovelight". The developmental stage of these tunes is nothing short of aurally palpable. The band is able to achieve -- if not arguably surpass -- much of the same energy that drove the versions which became indelibly stamped into the psyche of the counterculture, as well as Deadheads world wide. Two from the Vault is a fun ride, as well as a glimpse into the immense improvisational talents of the Grateful Dead in the late '60s.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/31/2004
  • Label: Grateful Dead / Wea
  • UPC: 081227895129
  • Catalog Number: 78951
  • Sales rank: 63,605

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Grateful Dead Primary Artist
Mickey Hart Percussion
Jerry Garcia Guitar, Vocals
Bob Weir Guitar, Vocals
Bill Kreutzmann Percussion
Phil Lesh Bass, Vocals
Ron "Pigpen" McKernan Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Technical Credits
Mickey Hart Composer
Jerry Garcia Composer
Grateful Dead Composer
Bob Weir Composer
Robert Hunter Composer
Tim Rose Composer
Bonnie Dobson Composer
Joe Gastwirt Mastering
Timothy Harris Cover Art
Dan Healy Producer
Bill Kreutzmann Composer
Phil Lesh Composer
Ron "Pigpen" McKernan Composer
Jeffrey Norman Engineer
Robert Peterson Composer
Harper Barnes Liner Notes
Don Pearson Engineer
Dick Latvala Tape Archivist
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Each And Every Gem

    Every song here is played beautifully. Each tune has its history both lyrically and musically. 1. Good Morning, Little Schoolgirl: Pig Pen, the original Grateful Dead frontman steps out for possibly the greatest Schoolgirl ever. He was their teather to earth as Phil Lesh called him. When he died in 1973, the Dead's sound changed dramatically. 2. Dark Star: The first song Robert Hunter wrote for the Dead. It is often compared to the version on LIVE DEAD,and many people prefer that version. This version, with Pig Pen on organ instead of T.C., is played at a simple yet no less poetic rhythm. 3. Saint Stephen: Again, not as adventurous as LIVE DEAD, yet still stunning lyrically. Wherever he goes, the people all complain. 4.The Eleven: If anyone ever comes across an Eleven that is 11:00 long, please let me know. The song is named after the chord changes in the music and while the lyrics have always baffled me, I seem to hear some references about loving life, and something about Jonah and the whale. 5. Death Don't Have No Mercy: Jerry Garcia returns to Earth for this one. This is such a great way to end the first set. I was on my trampoline with my iPod listening to disc one and as the instruments dove down to the final coda, a large hawk flapped its wings and flew off into the sunset, which was a very psychedelic image for me. I guess animals are Deadheads too. 6. That's It For The Other One: The opening melody sees us walking through Golden Gate Park or Grosvenor Square, though the lyrics are somewhat dark and sad. The drums explode and we are sent into a hippie pergutory witnessed by Bob Weir as he is harrassed by policemen for smiling on a cloudy day, chased through lily fields, and escaping until Cowboy Neil picks him up and the bus speeds into Never Ever Land. We return to the melody to which all instruments play peacefully until reality and dreams all become one. Awareness is disguised. Are we sleeping? Are we awake? Are we dancing in the garden of Earthly Delights? Nothing matters anymore. It's as if, we've lost natural weight and are floating ethereally in the silk of paradise and the begonias at our feet. 7. New Potato Caboose: We are taken into a higher Heaven with this, my all time favorite Grateful Dead song. A very peaceful melodic intro, with Bob Weir's voice soaring over the green trees of California. If you listen to the music in this song, it sounds like a big thunder storm is coming in. Phil Lesh's bass takes off the ground, the thunder coming down on all sides. Then... the sun! the carousel! a melody merry-go-round with children moving their souls. Such a free and easy ride. Bob's guitar turns around. The party is over. It's time to go down from the light, back through the thunder and crashing back onto earth, we find ourselves with the funkiest 8. Turn On Your Lovelight that I've ever heard. The song is not only Pig Pen's finest hour, but it is also a showcase for Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart who's rhythm gets everyone on their feet. The ending leaves everyone cheering and clapping and stomping their feet. 9. Morning Dew: The only anti-Vietnam, cold war jam I've heard the Dead do. This version will no doubt be compared to the one on Europe '72. While that version has a beautiful melody with Keith Godchaux's piano, I prefer this version which is thundering and serene. The song ends prematurely with the janitors pulling the plug on the band. I don't think anyone was dissapointed though. It was too great to frown about. But that gives us the question. When the sound goes off, are we awake, or still dreaming? *When Jerry died in 1995, Carlos Santana said of him "He's awake and we're still dreaming."

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