The Two Gentlemen of Verona (Folger Shakespeare Library Series) by William Shakespeare, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Two Gentlemen Of Verona

Two Gentlemen Of Verona

1.8 5
by William Shakespeare
     
 

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Excerpt-Look, how a bird lies tangled in a net,
So fasten'd in her arms Adonis lies;
Pure shame and awed resistance made him fret,
Which bred more beauty in his angry eyes:
Rain added to a river that is rank
Perforce will force it overflow the bank.
Still she entreats, and prettily entreats,
For to a pretty ear she tunes her tale;
Still

Overview

Excerpt-Look, how a bird lies tangled in a net,
So fasten'd in her arms Adonis lies;
Pure shame and awed resistance made him fret,
Which bred more beauty in his angry eyes:
Rain added to a river that is rank
Perforce will force it overflow the bank.
Still she entreats, and prettily entreats,
For to a pretty ear she tunes her tale;
Still is he sullen, still he lours and frets,
'Twixt crimson shame and anger ashy-pale:
Being red, she loves him best; and being white,
Her best is better'd with a more delight.
Look how he can, she cannot choose but love;
And by her fair immortal hand she swears,
From his soft bosom never to remove,
Till he take truce with her contending tears,
Which long have rain'd, making her cheeks all wet;
And one sweet kiss shall pay this countless debt.
Upon this promise did he raise his chin,
Like a dive-dapper peering through a wave,
Who, being look'd on, ducks as quickly in;
So offers he to give what she did crave;
But when her lips were ready for his pay,
He winks, and turns his lips another way.
Never did passenger in summer's heat
More thirst for drink than she for this good turn.
Her help she sees, but help she cannot get;
She bathes in water, yet her fire must burn:
'O, pity,' 'gan she cry, 'flint-hearted boy!
'Tis but a kiss I beg; why art thou coy?
'I have been woo'd, as I entreat thee now,
Even by the stern and direful god of war,
Whose sinewy neck in battle ne'er did bow,
Who conquers where he comes in every jar;
Yet hath he been my captive and my slave,
And begg'd for that which thou unask'd shalt have.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940149717194
Publisher:
Kartindo Publishing House
Publication date:
06/13/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
67 KB

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The Two Gentlemen of Verona (Oxford Shakespeare Series) 1.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although few would claim that Two Gentlemen of Verona is one of Shakespeare¿s greatest plays, it is well worth reading in order to serve as a reference for the best of his romantic comedies. In essence, Two Gentlemen of Verona gives you a measuring stick to see the brilliance in the best works. The play has the first of Shakespeare¿s many brave, resourceful and cross-dressing heroines, Julia. Shakespeare always used his fools and clowns well to make serious statements about life and love, and to expose the folly of the nobles. Two Gentlemen of Verona has two very fine comic scenes featuring Launce. In one, he lists the qualities of a milk maid he has fallen in love with and helps us to see that love is blind and relative. In another, he describes the difficulties he has delivering a pet dog to Silvia on his master, Proteus¿, behalf in a way that will keep you merry on many a cold winter¿s evening. The story also has one of the fastest plot resolutions you will ever find in a play. Blink, and the play is over. This nifty sleight of hand is Shakespeare¿s way of showing that when you get noble emotions and character flowing together, things go smoothly and naturally. The overall theme of the play develops around the relative conflicts that lust, love, friendship, and forgiveness can create and overcome. Proteus is a man who seems literally crazed by his attraction to Silvia so that he loses all of his finer qualities. Yet even he can be redeemed, after almost doing a most foul act. The play is very optimistic in that way. I particularly enjoy the plot device of having Proteus and Julia (pretending to be a page) playing in the roles of false suitors for others to serve their own interests. Fans of Othello will enjoy these foreshadowings of Iago. The words themselves can be a bit bare at times, requiring good direction and acting to bring out the full conflict and story. For that reason, I strongly urge you to see the play performed first. If that is not possible, do listen to an audio recording as you read along. That will help round out the full atmosphere that Shakespeare was developing here. After you finish Two Gentlemen of Verona, think about where you would honor friendship above love, where equal to love, and where below love. Is friendship less important than love? Or is friendship merely less intense? Can you experience both with the same person? Enjoy close ties of mutual commitment . . . with all those you feel close to! Donald Mitchell, co-author of The 2,000 Percent Solution and The Irresistible Growth Enterprise
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sound like a creeps behind me when i read it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beware, this version is not formatted properly.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's weird
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is probably his worst play. Possibly the merry wives of winsor, but i think this is worse. First of all, it was white-supremasist, christain supremacist, and sexist. The final scene was a disturbance, and where was the death? It was a comedy, but it wasnt good. Shakespeare is the greatest writer of all time, but that is based on Hamlet, Othello, Merchant of Venice (my favorite comedy) and Romeo and Juliet (i believe it is his best work). Any Chekhov, Sophocles, Ibsen, or Arthur Miller is better than most of Shakespeare's plays. This was an experimental comedy, but not one of his better ones. Very dissapointing, read Merchant of Venice first.