Two Plays: Skellig/Wild Boy, Wild Girl [NOOK Book]

Overview

David Almond turns his talents to drama in these two plays. Skellig is the dramatization of his highly acclaimed novel. What has Michael found in the derelict garage? What is this creature that lies in the darkness? Is it human, or a strange beast never seen before? And what will happen in the world when he carries it out into the light?
Wild Girl, Wild Boy is an original play produced in London by the Pop-Up Theatre company. Young Elaine has recently lost her father, and now ...
See more details below
Two Plays: Skellig/Wild Boy, Wild Girl

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

David Almond turns his talents to drama in these two plays. Skellig is the dramatization of his highly acclaimed novel. What has Michael found in the derelict garage? What is this creature that lies in the darkness? Is it human, or a strange beast never seen before? And what will happen in the world when he carries it out into the light?
Wild Girl, Wild Boy is an original play produced in London by the Pop-Up Theatre company. Young Elaine has recently lost her father, and now she spends her days dreaming in the family’s garden, skipping school, unable to read or write. One day, Elaine conjures up a Wild Boy from spells and fairy seed. No one else can see him, and Elaine disappears into a world of fantasy where she and Wild Boy remember the teachings of her father. Will her mother ever come to understand?
These two plays introduce a new talent from the remarkable David Almond.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Those who enjoyed David Almond's tantalizing novel Skellig may wish to see the author's adaptation of the story into a play in Two Plays, which includes Skellig and also Wild Girl, Wild Boy. The second follows a girl, traumatized by the recent death of her father, who regresses to primitive behavior, and the "wild boy" who reaches out to her. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-Two sophisticated plays based on the theme of the power of love. In Wild Girl, Wild Boy, Elaine, who has lost her father, finds comfort in the "wild boy" who comes to visit her and whom only she can see. Her mother fears that her daughter has lost her wits from grief. Eventually, Elaine persuades her to trust in the power of their love for their deceased father and husband, and the two begin to build a new life-one that has room for fantasy, hope, and dreams. Skellig, based on Almond's novel by the same name, also includes a strong element of fantasy. Young Michael's family moves to a new home just as his baby sister is born. When his jealousy overwhelms him, he retreats to the dilapidated garage on their property and discovers that a strange old man named Skellig is living there. Fascinated by the recluse's eccentricities, Michael and his friend Mina discover that he is no ordinary mortal. When it becomes clear that Michael's newborn sister could die from a weak heart, the boy enlists Skellig's help in saving her. Well written and serious in nature, both plays have a strong spiritual element. The author's afterword explains the subtleties of writing drama vs. prose. Almond's plays-well received in Britain, as evidenced by their extensive tour and by the fact that Trevor Nunn was involved in staging one of them-will appeal to savvy thespians looking for a challenge. They will be of greater interest to and more appropriate for schools (middle through college) with strong theater departments, rather than for general collections.-Nancy Menaldi-Scanlan, LaSalle Academy, Providence, RI Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In "Wild Girl, Wild Boy," Elaine Grew's father encouraged her to "Crawl deep into the wilderness. Go on. Get lost in there." Since her father's death, Elaine has indeed been lost in the wilderness of her own mind and grief, and her bizarre behaviors earn the derision of her classmates, who call her loony, daft and crazy. There's hope though when she hears her father say, "Time to come back out," and her mother decides to meet her on her own terms. Unusual but oddly likable and haunting. A fine afterword offers advice to young readers and writers. Less successful is "Skellig: The Play," which suffers in comparison to the novel. Telling so much through narrators distances the story, which never comes alive and seems choppy and stilted next to the rich, layered, magical original. Teachers will see an opportunity here for performance, but reading the real thing aloud would be a richer experience. (Fiction. 8-12)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307548498
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 4/21/2010
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)