Two Sides of Dave Van Ronk

Two Sides of Dave Van Ronk

3.0 1
by Dave Van Ronk
     
 
This two-on-one single-CD pairing of sessions from 1963 and 1981 isn't the most logical chronological mating, but Van Ronk's style was consistent enough throughout his career that it's not jarring, though neither album is among his very best. The first half of the disc is devoted to the whole of the 1963 In the Tradition album, which

Overview

This two-on-one single-CD pairing of sessions from 1963 and 1981 isn't the most logical chronological mating, but Van Ronk's style was consistent enough throughout his career that it's not jarring, though neither album is among his very best. The first half of the disc is devoted to the whole of the 1963 In the Tradition album, which was evenly split between tracks on which the singer is backed by the Dixieland jazz-style combo the Red Onions and by more customary acoustic folk-blues solo guitar. That 1963 session isn't too much different from much of the rest of his catalog, other than in the balanced mixture between jazz and folk approaches. Of the trad jazz cuts, the item that might attract the most collector interest is the jaunty "All Over You," which is certainly one of the most obscure (and atypical) early Bob Dylan covers; Dylan would never release his own version, though a demo he did of the tune in 1963 has appeared on bootlegs. It's not much of a song, but its basic joie de vivre fits in well with the jazz segment of this program, on which Van Ronk's gravelly vocals credibly echo (especially for a white singer) the spirit of early New Orleans jazz vocalists like Louis Armstrong. Among the acoustic numbers are "Green, Green Rocky Road" and "Rocks and Gravel," both of which would be recorded by several other major talents of the '60s folk scene. The CD also contains all but two songs ("In the Midnight Hour" and "Stagolee") from a solo acoustic album he recorded in a single-night session in London in 1981, Your Basic Dave Van Ronk. If you'd been following Van Ronk up to that point, it wouldn't have contained anything in its approach that you hadn't heard before; indeed, some of the songs ("God Bless the Child," "Cocaine," "St. James Infirmary," "Candy Man") had been included on Van Ronk albums released many years prior to 1981. Still, Van Ronk's powers as an excellent folk-blues interpreter were fully intact, and it did include two original Van Ronk compositions in "Sunday Street" and "Gaslight Rag," the latter an homage to the famed Gaslight club in Greenwich Village.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/04/2002
Label:
Fantasy
UPC:
0025218247221
catalogNumber:
24772
Rank:
90295

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Dave Van Ronk   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals
Dick Dreiwitz   Trombone
Hank Ross   Piano

Technical Credits

Arlo Guthrie   Composer
Dave Peabody   Liner Notes
Dave Van Ronk   Arranger
Karl Dallas   Liner Notes
Rev. Gary Davis   Composer
Rudy Van Gelder   Engineer
Mitch Greenhill   Liner Notes
Nic Kinsey   Engineer
Paul Rothchild   Producer
Jamie Putnam   Art Direction
Marc Norberg   Cover Photo
Traditional   Composer
Karl Dallas   Producer
T. J. Amall   Composer

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Two Sides of Dave Van Ronk 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
TheConstantWeeder More than 1 year ago
I went looking for a Dave Van Ronk CD to fill the spaces in my collection where he wasn't. Two sides describes the CD - almost. You get the Vank Ronk you always knew, growly, scratchy, fun, coupled with his guitar-playing style that made his music what it is. But then you also get the over-produced, horn-blowing, jazzy stuff that nearly takes his personality out of the music. Why try to put polish on this man's sound? What was he thinking? Uh....nevermind that question. With that said, if there were actually "two" sides....the acoustic, and with-band, separate, I would feel much more comfortable listening to this CD. I actually like to put it on "random" so that I never know what's going to play next, so that I don't feel as insulted by the horns when they arrive. The sound quality definitely suffers for the two styles of music as well. You have to turn up some of the selections to hear Van Ronk at all, and quickly turn it down again, unless you forgot, and put it on random, and then - SURPRISE!