The Two Towers (Lord of the Rings Trilogy #2)

( 638 )

Overview

Sauron, the Dark Lord, has gathered to him all the Rings of Power except one -- the One Ring that rules them all -- which has fallen into the hands of the hobbit Bilbo Baggins. Young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task when Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must make a perilous journey across Middle-earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose.

Saga of a group heroes who set forth to ...

See more details below
Audiobook (CD - Unabridged, 14 CDs, 17 hrs.)
$42.74
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$49.99 List Price
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (9) from $13.58   
  • New (4) from $32.32   
  • Used (5) from $13.58   
The Two Towers: Being the Second Part of The Lord of the Rings

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price
(Save 28%)$13.95 List Price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Sauron, the Dark Lord, has gathered to him all the Rings of Power except one -- the One Ring that rules them all -- which has fallen into the hands of the hobbit Bilbo Baggins. Young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task when Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must make a perilous journey across Middle-earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose.

Saga of a group heroes who set forth to save their world from evil. A brotherhood of 'hobbits,' elves, dwarves, and people is formed to combat evil forces. Tolkien drew on his extensive knowledge of folklore and the classics to create the worlds and creatures described in the trilogy, which includes The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

New York Times
An extraordinary work—pure excitement...
C.S. Lewis
Here are beauties which pierce like swords or burn like cold iron..
Time Magazine
One of the great fairy-tale quests in modern literature.
Newsweek
A remarkable book.
Nation
A work of immense narrative power that can sweep the reader up and hold him enthralled for days and weeks..
New Republic
One of the very few works of genius in recent literature.
Sunday Telegraph
Among the greatest works of imaginative fiction of the twentieth century.
Boston Herald
A masterful story — an epic in its own way — with elements of high adventure, suspense, mystery, poetry and fantasy..
Time Magazine
One of the great fairy-tale quests in modern literature.
Boston Herald
A masterful story — an epic in its own way — with elements of high adventure, suspense, mystery, poetry and fantasy..
Magazine Time
One of the great fairy-tale quests in modern literature.
New York Times
An extraordinary work—pure excitement....
Sunday Telegraph
Among the greatest works of imaginative fiction of the twentieth century..
From The Critics
"Among the greatest works of imaginative fiction of the twentieth century." --- Sunday Telegraph
From the Publisher
. . . spirited productions . . . stirring music . . .
The Washington Post
. . . spirited productions . . . stirring music . . .
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780788789830
  • Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC
  • Publication date: 6/28/2001
  • Series: Lord of the Rings Trilogy , #2
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged, 14 CDs, 17 hrs.
  • Pages: 75
  • Sales rank: 390,947
  • Product dimensions: 6.28 (w) x 6.24 (h) x 1.93 (d)

Meet the Author

J.R.R. TOLKIEN has legions of devoted fans and is widely regarded as the father of fantasy literature. The Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit—both 20th century classics and perennial bestsellers—continue to provide the primary inspiration for today's fantasy authors.

Biography

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien was born on the 3rd January, 1892 at Bloemfontein in the Orange Free State, but at the age of four he and his brother were taken back to England by their mother. After his father's death the family moved to Sarehole, on the south-eastern edge of Birmingham. Tolkien spent a happy childhood in the countryside and his sensibility to the rural landscape can clearly be seen in his writing and his pictures.

His mother died when he was only twelve and both he and his brother were made wards of the local priest and sent to King Edward's School, Birmingham, where Tolkien shine in his classical work. After completing a First in English Language and Literature at Oxford, Tolkien married Edith Bratt. He was also commissioned in the Lancashire Fusiliers and fought in the battle of the Somme. After the war, he obtained a post on the New English Dictionary and began to write the mythological and legendary cycle which he originally called "The Book of Lost Tales" but which eventually became known as The Silmarillion.

In 1920 Tolkien was appointed Reader in English Language at the University of Leeds which was the beginning of a distinguished academic career culminating with his election as Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. Meanwhile Tolkien wrote for his children and told them the story of The Hobbit. It was his publisher, Stanley Unwin, who asked for a sequel to The Hobbit and gradually Tolkien wrote The Lord of the Rings, a huge story that took twelve years to complete and which was not published until Tolkien was approaching retirement. After retirement Tolkien and his wife lived near Oxford, but then moved to Bournemouth. Tolkien returned to Oxford after his wife's death in 1971. He died on 2 September 1973 leaving The Silmarillion to be edited for publication by his son, Christopher.

Author biography courtesy of HarperCollins (UK).

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 3, 1892
    2. Place of Birth:
      Bloemfontein, Orange Free State (South Africa)
    1. Date of Death:
      September 2, 1973
    2. Place of Death:
      Oxford, England

Read an Excerpt

THE DEPARTURE OF BOROMIR

Aragorn sped on up the hill. Every now and again he bent to the ground. Hobbits go light, and their footprints are not easy even for a Ranger to read, but not far from the top a spring crossed the path, and in the wet earth he saw what he was seeking.

‘I read the signs aright,’ he said to himself. ‘Frodo ran to the hill-top. I wonder what he saw there? But he returned by the same way, and went down the hill again.

Aragorn hesitated. He desired to go to the high seat himself, hoping to see there something that would guide him in his perplexities; but time was pressing. Suddenly he leaped forward, and ran to the summit, across the great flag-stones, and up the steps. Then sitting in the high seat he looked out. But the sun seemed darkened, and the world dim and re- mote. He turned from the North back again to North, and saw nothing save the distant hills, unless it were that far away he could see again a great bird like an eagle high in the air, descending slowly in wide circles down towards the earth.

Even as he gazed his quick ears caught sounds in the woodlands below, on the west side of the River. He stiffened. There were cries, and among them, to his horror, he could distinguish the harsh voices of Orcs. Then suddenly with a deep-throated call a great horn blew, and the blasts of it smote the hills and echoed in the hollows, rising in a mighty shout above the roaring of the falls.

‘The horn of Boromir!’ he cried. ‘He is in need!’ He sprang down the steps and away, leaping down the path. ‘Alas! An ill fate is on me this day, and all that I do goes amiss. Where is Sam?

Ashe ran the cries came louder, but fainter now and desperately the horn was blowing. Fierce and shrill rose the yells of the Orcs, and suddenly the horn-calls ceased. Aragorn raced down the last slope, but before he could reach the hill’s foot, the sounds died away; and as he turned to the left and ran towards them they retreated, until at last he could hear them no more. Drawing his bright sword and crying Elendil! Elendil! he crashed through the trees.

A mile, maybe, from Parth Galen in a little glade not far from the lake he found Boromir. He was sitting with his back to a great tree, as if he was resting. But Aragorn saw that he was pierced with many black-feathered arrows; his sword was still in his hand, but it was broken near the hilt; his horn cloven in two was at his side. Many Orcs lay slain, piled all about him and at his feet.

Aragorn knelt beside him. Boromir opened his eyes and strove to speak. At last slow words came. ‘I tried to take the Ring from Frodo,’ he said. ‘I am sorry. I have paid.’ His glance strayed to his fallen enemies; twenty at least lay there. ‘They have gone: the Halflings: the Orcs have taken them. I think they are not dead. Orcs bound them.’ He paused and his eyes closed wearily. After a moment he spoke again.

‘Farewell, Aragorn! Go to Minas Tirith and save my people! I have failed.

‘No!’ said Aragorn, taking his hand and kissing his brow. ‘You have conquered. Few have gained such a victory. Be at peace! Minas Tirith shall not fall!

Boromir smiled.

‘Which way did they go? Was Frodo there?’ said Aragorn.

But Boromir did not speak again.

‘Alas!’ said Aragorn. ‘Thus passes the heir of Denethor, Lord of the Tower of Guard! This is a bitter end. Now the Company is all in ruin. It is I that have failed. Vain was Gandalf’s trust in me. What shall I do now? Boromir has laid it on me to go to Minas Tirith, and my heart desires it; but where are the Ring and the Bearer? How shall I find them and save the Quest from disaster?

He knelt for a while, bent with weeping, still clasping Boromir’s hand. So it was that Legolas and Gimli found him. They came from the western slopes of the hill, silently, creeping through the trees as if they were hunting. Gimli had his axe in hand, and Legolas his long knife: all his arrows were spent. When they came into the glade they halted in amazement; and then they stood a moment with heads bowed in grief, for it seemed to them plain what had happened.

‘Alas!’ said Legolas, coming to Aragorn’s side. ‘We have hunted and slain many Orcs in the woods, but we should have been of more use here. We came when we heard the horn—but too late, it seems. I fear you have taken deadly hurt.

‘Boromir is dead,’ said Aragorn. ‘I am unscathed, for I was not here with him. He fell defending the hobbits, while I was away upon the hill.

‘The hobbits!’ cried Gimli. ‘Where are they then? Where is Frodo?

‘I do not know,’ answered Aragorn wearily. ‘Before he died Boromir told me that the Orcs had bound them; he did not think that they were dead. I sent him to follow Merry and Pippin; but I did not ask him if Frodo or Sam were with him: not until it was too late. All that I have done today has gone amiss. What is to be done now?

‘First we must tend the fallen,’ said Legolas. ‘We cannot leave him lying like carrion among these foul Orcs.

‘But we must be swift,’ said Gimli. ‘He would not wish us to linger. We must follow the Orcs, if there is hope that any of our Company are living prisoners.

‘But we do not know whether the Ring-bearer is with them or not,’ said Aragorn. ‘Are we to abandon him? Must we not seek him first? An evil choice is now before us!

‘Then let us do first what we must do,’ said Legolas. ‘We have not the time or the tools to bury our comrade fitly, or to raise a mound over him. A cairn we might build.

‘The labour would be hard and long: there are no stones that we could use nearer than the water-side,’ said Gimli.

‘Then let us lay him in a boat with his weapons, and the weapons of his vanquished foes,’ said Aragorn. ‘We will send him to the Falls of Rauros and give him to Anduin. The River of Gondor will take care at least that no evil creature dishonours his bones.

Quickly they searched the bodies of the Orcs, gathering their swords and cloven helms and shields into a heap.

‘See!’ cried Aragorn. ‘Here we find tokens!’ He picked out from the pile of grim weapons two knives, leaf-bladed, damasked in gold and red; and searching further he found also the sheaths, black, set with small red gems. ‘No orc-tools these!’ he said. ‘They were borne by the hobbits. Doubtless the Orcs despoiled them, but feared to keep the knives, knowing them for what they are: work of Westernesse, wound about with spells for the bane of Mordor. Well, now, if they still live, our friends are weaponless. I will take these things, hoping against hope, to give them back.

‘And I,’ said Legolas, ‘will take all the arrows that I can find, for my quiver is empty.’ He searched in the pile and on the ground about and found not a few that were undamaged and longer in the shaft than such arrows as the Orcs were accustomed to use. He looked at them closely.

And Aragorn looked on the slain, and he said: ‘Here lie many that are not folk of Mordor. Some are from the North, from the Misty Mountains, if I know anything of Orcs and their kinds. And here are others strange to me. Their gear is not after the manner of Orcs at all!

There were four goblin-soldiers of greater stature, swart, slant-eyed, with thick legs and large hands. They were armed with short broad-bladed swords, not with the curved scimitars usual with Orcs; and they had bows of yew, in length and shape like the bows of Men. Upon their shields they bore a strange device: a small white hand in the centre of a black field; on the front of their iron helms was set an S-rune, wrought of some white metal.

‘I have not seen these tokens before,’ said Aragorn. ‘What do they mean?

‘S is for Sauron,’ said Gimli. ‘That is easy to read.

‘Nay!’ said Legolas. ‘Sauron does not use the Elf-runes.

‘Neither does he use his right name, nor permit it to be spelt or spoken, said Aragorn. ‘And he does not use white. The Orcs in the service of Barad-dûr use the sign of the Red Eye.’ He stood for a moment in thought. ‘S is for Saruman, I guess,’ he said at length. ‘There is evil afoot in Isengard, and the West is no longer safe. It is as Gandalf feared: by some means the traitor Saruman has had news of our journey. It is likely too that he knows of Gandalf’s fall. Pursuers from Moria may have escaped the vigilance of Lórien, or they may have avoided that land and come to Isengard by other paths. Orcs travel fast. But Saruman has many ways of learning news. Do you remember the birds?

‘Well, we have no time to ponder riddles,’ said Gimli. ‘Let us bear Boromir away!

‘But after that we must guess the riddles, if we are to choose our course rightly,’ answered Aragorn.

‘Maybe there is no right choice,’ said Gimli.

Taking his axe the Dwarf now cut several branches. These they lashed together with bowstrings, and spread their cloaks upon the frame. Upon this rough bier they carried the body of their companion to the shore, together with such trophies of his last battle as they chose to send forth with him. It was only a short way, yet they found it no easy task, for Boromir was a man both tall and strong.

At the water-side Aragorn remained, watching the bier, while Legolas and Gimli hastened back on foot to Parth Galen. It was a mile or more, and it was some time before they came back, paddling two boats swiftly along the shore.

‘There is a strange tale to tell!’ said Legolas. ‘There are only two boats upon the bank. We could find no trace of the other.

‘Have Orcs been there?’ asked Aragorn.

‘We saw no signs of them,’ answered Gimli. ‘And Orcs would have taken or destroyed all the boats, and the baggage as well.

‘I will look at the ground when we come there,’ said Aragorn.

Now they laid Boromir in the middle of the boat that was to bear him away. The grey hood and elven-cloak they folded and placed beneath his head. They combed his long dark hair and arrayed it upon his shoulders. The golden belt of Lórien gleamed about his waist. His helm they set beside him, and across his lap they laid the cloven horn and the hilts and shards of his sword; beneath his feet they put the swords of his enemies. Then fastening the prow to the stern of the other boat, they drew him out into the water. They rowed sadly along the shore, and turning into the swift-running channel they passed the green sward of Parth Galen. The steep sides of Tol Brandir were glowing: it was now mid-afternoon. As they went south the fume of Rauros rose and shimmered before them, a haze of gold. The rush and thunder of the falls shook the windless air.

Sorrowfully they cast loose the funeral boat: there Boromir lay, restful, peaceful, gliding upon the bosom of the flowing water. The stream took him while they held their own boat back with their paddles. He floated by them, and slowly his boat departed, waning to a dark spot against the golden light; and then suddenly it vanished. Rauros roared on unchanging. The River had taken Boromir son of Denethor, and he was not seen again in Minas Tirith, standing as he used to stand upon the White Tower in the morning. But in Gondor in after-days it long was said that the elven-boat rode the falls and the foaming pool, and bore him down through Osgiliath, and past the many mouths of Anduin, out into the Great Sea at night under the stars.

For a while the three companions remained silent, gazing after him. Then Aragorn spoke. ‘They will look for him from the White Tower,’ he said, ‘but he will not return from mountain or from sea.’ Then slowly he began to sing:

Through Rohan over fen and field where the long grass grows

The West Wind comes walking, and about the walls it goes.

‘What news from the West, O wandering wind, do you bring to me tonight?

Have you seen Boromir the Tall by moon or by starlight?

‘I saw him ride over seven streams, over waters wide and grey;

I saw him walk in empty lands, until he passed away

Into the shadows of the North. I saw him then no more.

The North Wind may have heard the horn of the son of Denethor.

‘O Boromir! From the high walls westward I looked afar,

But you came not from the empty lands where no men are.

Then Legolas sang:

From the mouths of the Sea the South Wind flies, from the sandhills and the stones;

The wailing of the gulls it bears, and at the gate it moans.

‘What news from the South, O sighing wind, do you bring to me at eve?

Where now is Boromir the Fair? He tarries and I grieve.

‘Ask not of me where he doth dwell—so many bones there lie

On the white shores and the dark shores under the stormy sky;

So many have passed down Anduin to find the flowing Sea.

Ask of the North Wind news of them the North Wind sends to me!

‘O Boromir! Beyond the gate the seaward road runs south,

But you came not with the wailing gulls from the grey sea’s mouth.

Then Aragorn sang again:

From the Gate of Kings the North Wind rides, and past the roaring falls;

And clear and cold about the tower its loud horn calls.

‘What news from the North, O mighty wind, do you bring to me today?

What news of Boromir the Bold? For he is long away.

‘Beneath Amon Hen I heard his cry. There many foes he fought.

His cloven shield, his broken sword, they to the water brought.

His head so proud, his face so fair, his limbs they laid to rest;

And Rauros, golden Rauros-falls, bore him upon its breast.

‘O Boromir! The Tower of Guard shall ever northward gaze

To Rauros, golden Rauros-falls, until the end of days.

So they ended. Then they turned their boat and drove it with all the speed they could against the stream back to Parth Galen.

‘You left the East Wind to me,’ said Gimli, ‘but I will say naught of it.

‘That is as it should be,’ said Aragorn. ‘In Minas Tirith they endure the East Wind, but they do not ask it for tidings. But now Boromir has taken his road, and we must make haste to choose our own.

He surveyed the green lawn, quickly but thoroughly, stooping often to the earth. ‘No Orcs have been on this ground,’ he said. ‘Otherwise nothing can be made out for certain. All our footprints are here, crossing and re-crossing. I cannot tell whether any of the hobbits have come back since the search for Frodo began.’ He returned to the bank, close to where the rill from the spring trickled out into the River. ‘There are some clear prints here,’ he said. ‘A hobbit waded out into the water and back; but I cannot say how long ago.

‘How then do you read this riddle?’ asked Gimli.

Aragorn did not answer at once, but went back to the camping-place and looked at the baggage. ‘Two packs are missing,’ he said, ‘and one is certainly Sam’s: it was rather large and heavy. This then is the answer: Frodo has gone by boat, and his servant has gone with him. Frodo must have returned while we were all away. I met Sam going up the hill and told him to follow me; but plainly he did not do so. He guessed his master’s mind and came back here before Frodo had gone. He did not find it easy to leave Sam behind!

‘But why should he leave us behind, and without a word?’ said Gimli. ‘That was a strange deed!

‘And a brave deed,’ said Aragorn. ‘Sam was right, I think. Frodo did not wish to lead any friend to death with him in Mordor. But he knew that he must go himself. Something happened after he left us that overcame his fear and doubt.

‘Maybe hunting Orcs came on him and he fled,’ said Legolas.

‘He fled, certainly,’ said Aragorn, ‘but not, I think, from Orcs.’ What he thought was the cause of Frodo’s sudden resolve and flight Aragorn did not say. The last words of Boromir he long kept secret.

‘Well, so much at least is now clear,’ said Legolas: ‘Frodo is no longer on this side of the River: only he can have taken the boat. And Sam is with him; only he would have taken his pack.

‘Our choice then,’ said Gimli, ‘is either to take the remaining boat and follow Frodo, or else to follow the Orcs on foot. There is little hope either way. We have already lost precious hours.

‘Let me think!’ said Aragorn. ‘And now may I make a right choice, and change the evil fate of this unhappy day!’ He stood silent for a moment. ‘I will follow the Orcs,’ he said at last. ‘I would have guided Frodo to Mordor and gone with him to the end; but if I seek him now in the wilderness, I must abandon the captives to torment and death. My heart speaks clearly at last: the fate of the Bearer is in my hands no longer. The Company has played its part. Yet we that remain cannot forsake our companions while we have strength left. Come! We will go now. Leave all that can be spared behind! We will press on by day and dark!

They drew up the last boat and carried it to the trees. They laid beneath it such of their goods as they did not need and could not carry away. Then they left Parth Galen. The afternoon was fading as they came back to the glade where Boromir had fallen. There they picked up the trail of the Orcs. It needed little skill to find.

‘No other folk make such a trampling,’ said Legolas. ‘It seems their delight to slash and beat down growing things that are not even in their way.

‘But they go with a great speed for all that,’ said Aragorn, ‘and they do not tire. And later we may have to search for our path in hard bare lands.

‘Well, after them!’ said Gimli. ‘Dwarves too can go swiftly, and they do not tire sooner than Orcs. But it will be a long chase: they have a long start.

‘Yes,’ said Aragorn, ‘we shall all need the endurance of Dwarves. But come! With hope or without hope we will follow the trail of our enemies. And woe to them, if we prove the swifter! We will make such a chase as shall be accounted a marvel among the Three Kindreds: Elves, Dwarves, and Men. Forth the Three Hunters!

Like a deer he sprang away. Through the trees he sped. On and on he led them, tireless and swift, now that his mind was at last made up. The woods about the lake they left behind. Long slopes they climbed, dark, hard-edged against the sky already red with sunset. Dusk came. They passed away, grey shadows in a stony land.


From the Audio Cassette edition.

Copyright 1986 by J. R. R. Tolkien
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

CONTENTS
NOTE ON THE TEXT
FOREWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
PROLOGUE CONCERNING HOBBITS, AND OTHER MATTERS
1. Concerning Hobbits
2. Concerning Pipe-weed
3. Of the Ordering of the Shire
4. Of the Finding of the Ring
NOTE ON THE SHIRE RECORDS
BOOK ONE
I A Long-expected Party
II The Shadow of the Past
III Three is Company
IV A Short Cut to Mushrooms
V A Conspiracy Unmasked
VI The Old Forest
VII In the House of Tom Bombadil
VIII Fog on the Barrow-Downs
IX At the Sign of The Prancing Pony
X Strider
XI A Knife in the Dark
XII Flight to the Ford
BOOK TWO
I Many Meetings
II The Council of Elrond
III The Ring Goes South
IV A Journey in the Dark
V The Bridge of Khazad-dûm
VI Lothlórien
VII The Mirror of Galadriel
VIII Farewell to Lórien
IX The Great River
X The Breaking of the Fellowship
SYNOPSIS
BOOK THREE
I The Departure of Boromir
II The Riders of Rohan
III The Uruk-Hai
IV Treebeard
V The White Rider
VI The King of the Golden Hall
VII Helm's Deep
VIII The Road to Isengard
IX Flotsam and Jetsam
X The Voice of Saruman 1111
XI The Palantír
BOOK FOUR
I The Taming of Sméagol
II The Passage of the Marshes
III The Black Gate is Closed
IV Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
V The Window on the West
VI The Forbidden Pool
VII Journey to the Cross-roads
VIII The Stairs of Cirith Ungol
IX Shelob's Lair
X The Choices of Master Samwise
BOOK FIVE
I Minas Tirith
II The Passing of the Grey Company
III The Muster of Rohan
IV The Siege of Gondor
V The Ride of the Rohirrim
VI The Battle of the Pelennor Fields
VII The Pyre of Denethor
VIII The Houses of Healing
IX The Last Debate
X The Black Gate Opens
BOOK SIX
I The Tower of Cirith Ungol
II The Land of Shadow
III Mount Doom
IV The Field of Cormallen
V The Steward and the King
VI Many Partings
VII Homeward Bound
VIII The Scouring of the Shire
IX The Grey Havens
APPENDICES
A ANNALS OF THE KINGS AND RULERS
I The Númenorean Kings
II The House of Eorl
III Durin's Folk
B THE TALE OF YEARS
(CHRONOLOGY OF THE WESTLANDS)
C FAMILY TREES (HOBBITS)
D CALENDARS
E WRITING AND SPELLING
I Pronunciation of Words and Names
II Writing
F
I The Languages and Peoples of the Third Age
II On Translation
INDEXES
I Songs and Verses
II Persons, Beasts and Monsters
III Places
IV Things
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 638 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(523)

4 Star

(79)

3 Star

(23)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(11)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 641 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2012

    Enchanting

    This novel made me happy and sad, angry and frightened. Now, I don't know if adults want this for teenagers, but this book made me think and wonder. This book made me want to close my eyes in corporate America, and open them in Middle Earth. I saw the story with my eyes, and every time I put the book down I kept seeing it. I would be walking around and my peers would turn into Elves, and my teachers would turn into Orcs! I connected to this book so much. It made me feel like Frodo is my closest friend and Saruman my most loathed enemy. The return of Gandalf the White made me feel like my Grandfather was back from the Dead! However, by putting me in a world so different from this one, it made me wish I could never leave the world of J. R. R. Tolkien. This book put me in a different world entirely and filled me with wonder. And I wish that it gives you the same.
    ~ERH

    15 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Brilliance is written on every page

    Let me first say that I struggled terribly to get through the first book. Reading it was like pushing myself through a marathon I had not yet trained for. But I read The Two Towers in just one week, and I read slow and have a busy schedule. The most amazing things about the books, to me, is how they tend to build your respect for Peter Jackson and his writing team to an all-time high. The changes they made for the movies were many, but necissary. This book doesn't read straight through following a chronological timeline. It jumps back and forth quite often (but Tolkein at least kept that very easy to follow). The Two Towers was extremely suspensful and terrifying at times even though I know the movies very well. I am sad for anyone who does not read The Lord of the Rings books even if they've seen the movies. There's a reason these books are on nearly ever Must Read List in the world. Pick 'em up and see why for yourself.

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 28, 2010

    Best Book in the Classic Trilogy

    The entire Lord of the Rings trilogy was GREAT. The Two Towers stood out because of its pace and action. I loved the first and third books of Tolkien's best ever fantasy, but this book is the gem which made LOTR truly great. Aragorn and the wonder of Middle Earth shine!

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2003

    best book u can read!

    this is a book i couldn't put down!this is the best book i read for a long time! if you like adventure books, you'll love this one, and the other series by this author.i read this book in two days.this is a 'can't put it down' kind of book. IF YOU LIKE THIS BOOK YOU'LL LOVE THE MOVIES!

    8 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2012

    The best

    I love this book...i love all Tolkien's books...they're amazing. My favourite character is Legolas, so I'd like to read more about him :)

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 6, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    lord of the rings the two towers

    The book that I read is the "Lord of the Rings, the Two Towers," written by J.R.R. Tolkien. The book takes place in the Medieval Times, so they talked differently and there were dragons, magic and other effects of that period. There are like 5 main characters that have a big role in the book, but the character that is most important is Frodo. He is the new ring bearer, (a ring bearer is someone who has the mythical ring of Saron). There are other main characters too, like Gimli, Aragon, Legolas, and Gandalf. What their role is, is to help cities, towns and just random people that they meet, to defend themselves against Orcs and people that are working and fighting with the evil Dark Lord Saron and his helper Seroman. Seroman, was once a good wizard, that was really good friends with Gandalf.

    The brave warriors have traveled to two major cities, Helm's Deep and Isengard. The most important city is Helms Deep. That is where our three heroes, Gimli, Aragon, Legolas, and Helm's Deeps Soldiers, the Rohan Riders, and elves, fought against over one million Orcs. It wasn't just a battle; it was a war. That is all I can tell you, because I don't want to spoil the surprise. What I can tell you is that the book is interesting and entertaining at the same time. One hero Gimli is a dwarf that doesn't like to be teased about his size. He and Legolas, another hero, have competitions that make you laugh at times, but at the same time, you are wondering what is going to happen next. This is a book that people that have seen the movie will also like the book. The book and series itself are excellent choices is you are looking for a great book to read.

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2009

    The two towers

    This was a very good book it makes you keep turning the pages one after another. It picks up where the previous book, The fellowship of the Ring left off. The book starts out with the fellowship together but they soon get separated. Frodo and Sam set out on a great journey. They find someone to show them the way to Mordor. And the rest of the fellowship has fought orcs and found the ents, which are really cool. I thought the book was amazing. One of the best books I've ever read. I almost could never put the book down. I loved the book and if you like fantasy you'll love this book.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2012

    Dear I hate jrr tolkein

    No one cares about your opinion. You probably hate it because it is an old book. Guess what? Almost every fantasy book copied something from him. Cough Harry Potter Cough

    5 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2005

    Ehhhhhh????

    I found all the Lord of the Rings books confusing and this one in particular. It just didn't have that zing that authors need in a book for it to be interesting. But I know many people love this book, and i just don't see why??? You need it to be totally quiet and you need to be focused to read it. But J.R. Tolkien was a very clever writer in thinking up this story. I couldn't have done it at all.

    5 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2009

    A Must Read

    The Two Towers by J.r.R Tolkien is by far one of the best books out there, second in my opinion only to the Return of the King. The book starts of with the hobbits Merry and Pippin going missing, and Legolas the Elf, Gimli, the Dwarf, and Aragorn, heir of Elendil, belive they have been taken by orcs. Thus, they embark on a thrilling orc hunt. Merry and Pippin, meanwhile, get lost in Fangorn Forest, and discover some interestingly epic creatures and storm Isengard, fortress of Saruman, the left-hand man of Sauron himself. Off in the East, however, Frodo the Ring-Bearer and Samwise Gamgee discover Gollum, who offers to be their guide into Mordor. Sam doesn't trust him, but Frodo says the have no choice, and that they must follow Gollum's route into Mordor. With such gripping things as the orc hunt, the return of a surprise character, the seige of Isengard, the crossing into Mordor, the Battle at Ithilien, the climbing of the Stairs of Cirith Ungol, and a twist ending, die-hard fantasy fans will not want to miss this one.


    (review by VM)

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2013

    Anonymous

    This book is great! If you like the book, I recommend you to watch the movie. If you like the movie, read the book! If you never read the book or watched the movie, I recommend you read the book first, because the movie cuts out a few scenes, like in the first book, The Fellowship of the Ring. If you never heard of Lord of the Rings, read all of the books first, then watch all of the movies so you understand the plot better in both the movie and the books, since they both have different story plots.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 14, 2012

    Highly recommended

    I have read this trilogy [The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and the Return of the King] Numerous times and never tire of them. For further enjoyment and understanding of the story, Before reading the trilogy, read, The Hobbit. No necesary but I recommend it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2012

    AWSOME!!!!¿!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    It is awsome. It is very loooong,but very exiting. You instatly are sucked into the world of Pipin and Merry, Strider,and Frodo.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 28, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A joining of evil forces

    In this part of the trilogy, there are several story lines being followed and every thing is much darker, more sinister. Frodo and Sam have struck out for Mordor on their own and have enlisted the aid of Gollum to show the way. Their journey is harrowing and grueling. A far cry from life in the Shire. Gollum is such an interesting character. You hate him, don't trust him, but you can't help pitying him, just the same. He used to be a Hobbit-like being but has been completely poisoned and destroyed by The Ring. The White Wizard, Saruman, has joined forces with Sauron and is planning on taking over the Kingdom of Rohan. Rohan is his neighboring country of men and they are known far and wide for their skill with horses. There is so much going on in this book, but I'd have to say my favorite beings are the Ents. I found them fascinating and, yet so familiar. I loved their language and stories. Like the first book, this one was very difficult to put down.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 16, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A Middle Earth Book that Brings Life to a Fantasy World

    The Lord of the Rings novel (though sometimes called a trilogy) is perhaps the most recognized trendsetter in the arena of fantasy. The level of detail and character evolution is incredible with no limits spared. Tolkien is truly a gifted writer that has established a place in history for his endeavor to bring to the reader a completely new world. Each book in the series builds on the last until the reader finds they are unable to put the books down. While not directly part of the Lord of the Rings novel, a favorite book about Bilbo's adventures in The Hobbit or There and Back Again is a not-to-be-missed read for those hoping to understand how the adventures of the Hobbits and the Ring first began.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    just as good as the first!

    this book is just as good as the first one was. the most vivid chapters in my mind from having read this book are the ones that talk about the Ents. they're amazing. the best part of the book is the last few chapters. things really start to pick up, especially when Frodo is in Shelob's lair. read this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 29, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    better then the movies

    I've always wanted to sit back and read Tolkien's works and finally have done so. and all I can say is wow. there is still nothing better then a good book or series of books. and what the movie maker did was ruin a perfect work of art. and twist it to make money. I find it funny that many year ago I seen the cartoon version of the lord of the rings, and wished he had finished that it was closer to the book then the actual live action movies. I am shocked and impressed with the way the book is laid out then I see the movies and while parts remain true to the book the rest is the imagination of the director. A sad statement of the times we now live in a modern era of everything has to be high speed or people don't care. like a look at star wars when lucas did the first films back in the 70's with less technology they were great. then came CGI and all its glossy effect and the story was lost but the movie was considered a success. I am ever so glad lucas based his world on his imagination and had not wrote a book before the movies or it would be a trivial waste like the movies for the Lord of the rings. After reading as far as I have I am now about to purchase the final book in this installment and have high hopes it's even that much better then the movie. The books have also jaded me in the fact I don't think I will watch the Hobbit movies after having read the books Because I know I will be just disillusioned by the tripe that hollywood dumbs us down to. Fats paced no plot and maybe 3 lines of a small book stretched to death in a three part movie. Unfortunately Hollywood seems to have mind control over everyone now. and it's what Is running away with the world. I think everyone needs to take a step back from hollywood for a moment or two and sit back and read the great works of Tolkien and others before seeing the movies the books are so much better written out then the movies will ever be (Sorry peter but you stink) as far as what kind of reader this book is for it's for all kinda and all ages in my opinion, I wish I had read it when I was a kid, it's a tough read a lot of strange words that are slowly dying in the english language now that everyone writes in simpleness. This book is perfect for any book club and for someone who wants to be a role player you can pick a couple people and follow their roles in your mind and see what they see and feel how they feel. if I could give this book ten stars I would along with the rest of Tolkien's works. Sorry for rambling but it has to be said by someone, the Dumbing of America is happening and it shows in the lack of literature and literacy. soon all anyone will knows is "would you like that super sized".

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2012

    I love this serious

    The lord of the rings is an epic adventure

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2012

    Nice book

    Wow! What a great book!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2012

    H

    H

    1 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 641 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)