Two Very Little Sisters

Two Very Little Sisters

by Carol Carrick, Erika Weihs
     
 

Descendants of John Quincy Adams, sisters Lucy and Sarah Adams didn't allow their diminutive physical stature to keep them from a satisfying life as entertainers and businesswomen in the late nineteenth century.  See more details below

Overview

Descendants of John Quincy Adams, sisters Lucy and Sarah Adams didn't allow their diminutive physical stature to keep them from a satisfying life as entertainers and businesswomen in the late nineteenth century.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-A nostalgic trip back to the late 1800s. Based upon the lives of two ``little people,'' this story includes references to P.T. Barnum's early ``Greatest Show,'' as well as traveling shows in the Western U.S. Although their siblings reached normal adult size, neither Lucy nor Sarah Adams attained more than four feet. After being discovered by Barnum, and subjected to some of the negative, prejudicial attitudes directed at those who were ``different,'' the sisters chose to develop their stage talents and apply them elsewhere. They ended their lives acting as hostesses and entertainers at a sedate New England tearoom in the family home. There the women found a satisfying and more acceptable way to share their musical and theatrical talents with the public. Although Carrick tells her story with grace and sensitivity, it has a sense of overly gentle blandness. Something exciting must have happened to the Adamses during their years of touring the continent, but the author chooses to cover this portion of their lives in a few pages. The incidents described are well executed in charming full-color illustrations, reminiscent of Barbara Cooney's work. Weihs has captured the atmosphere of life during a different era, and the authenticity of detail in architecture, furnishings, and dress gives a vivid sense of time and place. A useful addition where there is a demand for pictorial historical fiction.-Martha Rosen, Edgewood School, Scarsdale, NY
Ilene Cooper
This is the story of Lucy and Sarah Adams, two little people (as most midgets prefer to be called), who grew up to become part of P. T. Barnum's circus. Their story begins on the family farm. Though Lucy and Sarah are perfectly formed, they never grow. When the girls are teenagers, Barnum reads about them in the newspaper and convinces them to become attractions at his show. But the girls don't like the atmosphere, so they go off on their own, singing and acting until they save enough to go home and turn the run-down family house into a tea room. Simply told, the girls' story will be of interest to kids who always want to know about people and things that are different. One has to sympathize with illustrator Weihs. It's difficult to show children who are very small; no matter the proportion, they don't look that different from other children. Thus, the folk-style art is only partially successful in illustrating the girls and is at its best when they are grown-up and can be compared with other adults. Otherwise, though, the pictures are quite charming, reminiscent of Barbara Cooney's work, and suit this direct account very well.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395609279
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/20/1993
Pages:
31
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 10.05(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Carol Carrick has written more than twenty-five well-received books for Clarion, including PATRICK'S DINOSAURS, one of the many books illustrated by her late husband, Donald Carrick. She lives in West Tisbury, Massachusetts.

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