Two Years Before The Mast

( 40 )

Overview

Two Years Before The Mast is Richard Henry Dana Jr.'s account of his life as a common seaman aboard the brig the Pilgrim which set out from Boston on August 14, 1835 destined for California by way of the treacherous Cape Horn.

Dana gives a detailed account of the workings of the ship, the day-to-day routines of the deck hands, and the brutal shortcomings of inept, tyrannical officers. This "author's edition" includes a chapter written by Dana twenty-four years after his initial...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $22.08   
  • New (4) from $22.08   
  • Used (2) from $32.59   
Two Years Before the Mast

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Two Years Before The Mast is Richard Henry Dana Jr.'s account of his life as a common seaman aboard the brig the Pilgrim which set out from Boston on August 14, 1835 destined for California by way of the treacherous Cape Horn.

Dana gives a detailed account of the workings of the ship, the day-to-day routines of the deck hands, and the brutal shortcomings of inept, tyrannical officers. This "author's edition" includes a chapter written by Dana twenty-four years after his initial voyage where he revisits some of the people, places and vessels that he had encountered on his original journey.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781404335066
  • Publisher: IndyPublish
  • Publication date: 12/11/2002
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 0.94 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Gary Kinder is the author of Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea. He lives in Seattle.

From the Trade Paperback edition.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt


top hailed, and said he believed it was land, after all. " Land in your eye!" said the mate, who was looking through the telescope; " they are ice islands, if I can see a hole through a ladder"; and a few moments showed the mate to be right; and all our expectations fled; and instead of what we most wished to see we had what we most dreaded, and what we hoped we had seen the last of. We soon, however, left these astern, having passed within about two miles of them, and at sundown the horizon was clear in all directions. Having a fine wind, we were soon up with and passed the latitude of the Cape, and, having stood far enough to the southward to give it a wide berth, we began to stand to the eastward, with a good prospect of being round and steering to the northward, on the other side, in a very few days. But ill luck seemed to have lighted upon us. Not four hours had we been standing on in this course before it fell dead calm, and in half an hour it clouded up, a few straggling blasts, with spits of snow and sleet, came from the eastward, and in an hour more we lay hove-to under a close-reefed main topsail, drifting bodily off to leeward before the fiercest storm that we had yet felt, blowing dead ahead, from the eastward. It seemed as though the genius of the place had been roused at finding that we had nearly slipped through his fingers, and had come down upon us with tenfold fury. The sailors said that every blast, as it shook the shrouds, and whistled through the rigging, said to the old ship, " No, you don't! " " No) you don't! " For eight days we lay drifting about in this manner. Sometimes generally towards noon it fell calm; once or twice a round copper ball showed itselffor a few moments in the place where the sun ought to have been, a puff or two came from t...
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter I.
Departure
First Impressions
Ship's Duties
Chapter II.
First Impressions
Ship's Duties
Chapter III.
Ship's Duties
Chapter IV.
Sundays At Sea
Trouble on Board
Land Ho
A Pampero
Cape Horn
Chapter V.
Cape Horn
A Visit
Chapter VI.
Loss Of a Man
Chapter VII.
Superstitions
Juan Fernandez
Putting the Vessel In Order
Chapter VIII.
Painting
Daily Life
Point Conception
Chapter IX.
Santa Barbara
Beach-Combing
A Southeaster
Chapter X.
A Southeaster
Passage Up the Coast
Chapter XI.
Passage Up the Coast
Monterey
Chapter XII.
Monterey
Chapter XIII.
Monterey
A British Sailor
Santa Barbara
Chapter XIV.
Hide Droghing
Discontent
San Pedro
Flogging
Chapter XV.
Flogging
Night On Shore
State of Things On Board
San Diego
Chapter XVI.
Liberty-Day On Shore
Chapter XVII.
San Diego
Desertion
San Pedro Again
Easter Sunday
Chapter XVIII.
Easter Sunday
Italian Sailors
San Juan
San Diego Again
Life on Shore
Chapter XIX.
Sandwich-Islanders
Hide-Curing
Wood-Cutting
Coyotes
Rattlesnakes
Chapter XX.
New Comers
People at the Hide-Houses
Leisure
Pilgrim News from Home
Pilgrim Occupations on the Beach
California and its Inhabitants
Chapter XXI.
California and its Inhabitants
Chapter XXII.
Life on the Beach
The Alert
Chapter XXIII.
New Ship and Shipmates
A Race
My Watchmate, Tom Harris
San Diego Again
Chapter XXIV.
A Descent
A Hurried Departure
A New Shipmate
Chapter XXV.
Rumors of War
A Spouter
Sudden Slipping for a Southeaster
To Windward
A Dry Gale
Chapter XXVI.
San Francisco
Monterey Revisited
Chapter XVII.
Monterey Revisited
A Set-to
A Decayed Gentleman
A Contrabandista
A Fandango
Chapter XVIII.
A Victim
California Rangers-Beach-Combers
News From Home
Last Looks
Chapter XXIX.
Loading for Home
A Surprise
Last of an Old Friend
The Last Hide
A Hard Case
An Anchor, for Home!
The Alert and California
Homeward Bound
Chapter XXX.
Homeward Bound
Our Passenger, Professor Nuttall
Homeward Bound
Chapter XXXI.
Bad Prospects
First Touch of Cape Horn
Iceburgs
Temperance Ships
Lying-Up
Ice
Difficulty on Board
Change of Course
Straits of Magellan
Chapter XXXII.
Ice Again
Disappointment
Cape Horn
Land Ho!
Chapter XXXIII.
Cracking On
Progress Homeward
A Fine Sight
Fitting Ship
By-Plane
Chapter XXXIV.
An Escape
Equator
Tropical Squalls
Tropical Thunder-Storm
Chapter XXXV.
A Reef-Topsail Breeze
Scurvy
A Friend in Need
Preparing for Port
Gulf Stream
Chapter XXXVI.
Soundings
Sights About Home
Boston Harbo
Leaving the Ship
Twenty Four Years After 432
Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

1. Discuss Dana's motives for the voyage. What do you feel was the predominating factor in his decision to undertake such a journey? What were the risks involved, and how serious do you feel they were? What is your view of Dana's momentous choice?

2. What do you make of Dana's attitude toward religion, and religious instruction? Do you agree or not? Why? Is his a perspective that is anachronistic, or not?

3. How does social class play a role in the book? Discuss the implications of Dana's background. How did it affect his experience on the ship? Did you find it important, or inconsequential?

4. What is your opinion of the book's stark realism? Does Dana have an agenda in writing the book? If so, what is it? Do you think the experience was a positive one for Dana, or not?

5. What is the role of nature and the outdoors for Dana? How does he view the American West? How does his voyage attest to his view of the outdoors? Does this view change throughout his experience on the ship? If so, how?

6. Discuss the contrasts between Captain Thompson and Captain Faucon. How do their leadership skills differ? Who is more effective, and why? Discuss Dana's book on a political level. What do his portrayals of each captain reveal?

7. Discuss the considerable shift in Dana's perspective as evidenced in 'Twenty-Four Years After.' How do you account for this change? Do you agree or disagree with the author's decision to replace the original final chapter with this later account? Why or why not?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 40 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(16)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 23, 2011

    Only fills half of nook's screen

    This copy only fills top third to top half of the screen. This makes it annoying to read given that you have to turn the page so much more often.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2012

    Love this book

    Couldnt put it down. The writing is descriptive and colorful. I thought I'd just skim through this book but in the end I didn't want to miss a word . Written in layman's terms for the most part you do not have to understand nautical terms to read this book. I had no trouble reading this on my Nook as someone earlier stated. They must be doing something wrong!

    If you enjoy history and want a true acvount of what life was like on a merchant ship or in California in the mid1800's you will love this book!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 30, 2013

    A must read for anyone who has felt the call of the sea.

    Appearing on many top 100 must read lists, this book deserves the acclaim. You smell the salt air and feel the cramped quarters of the narrator, a Harvard educated young man who takes on the adventure of a lifetime as a common sailor in the 1830's. A poignant portrayal of nautical life and California's early days as a part of Mexico. A unique personal history that stands the test of time.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2013

    Fatty

    Yup!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2012

    Good book

    I went on the pilgrim for the book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2008

    A reviewer

    'All hands on deck!' shouted the captain's booming voiceas it echoed throughout the ship. The captain told us we had a hard day's work packed ahead of us. We were sailing around the bottom tip of South America, Cape Horn. We were in for a trecherous sail and boy we were so tired from the last four months at sea that we did not know how we'd get through this. The captain ordered all the sails to be put down and none of us wanted to do it. We knew we'd have to do what the captain said. This book is about a boy who is wealthy and he attends Harvard University. His eyes had been hurting him so he went to the doctor and the doctor said he needed a while at sea. He signed on the pilgrim. He did not know in 1835 how a sailor was treated. The captain is nice at first, but soon he sees how much power he has and whips some men. He does not regret signing on the Pilgrim, but it is not his favorite 'vacation' either. Read this book to find out what happens. The message is that to have money you need to work. Work is not always easy. If you live in a nice home and are wealthy maybe you should try living in the hard life. It is not always easy to not have a lot of money. This book was interesting because if I had not read it I would not have known how sailors work and make a living. I think readers who are up for adventure should read this book. Just get ready for scary things! This book is very good and I think you should sign aboard the Pilgrim and dive into this adventurous true book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2004

    Detailed, but exciting

    Dana's account of his travels around the Cape and along the coast of California paints an excellent portrait of the life of a 19th century seaman. Although the nautical terminology is at times difficult to follow, the story and characters are riveting. This is a classic among nautical tales.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2003

    A Classic Hit

    I thoroughly loved this book, and have passed it on to friends. My husband, who is a boat captain read it several times. One does not have to be involved with ship sailing to fall in love with this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)