Two Years Before the Mast (Illustrated) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Two Years Before the Mast is a book by the American author Richard Henry Dana, Jr., published in 1840, having been written after a two-year sea voyage starting in 1834. A film adaptation under the same name was released in 1946.

In the book, which takes place between 1834 and 1836, Dana gives a vivid account of "the life of a common sailor at sea as it really is". He sails from Boston to South America and around Cape Horn to California. ...
See more details below
Two Years Before the Mast (Illustrated)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$3.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Two Years Before the Mast is a book by the American author Richard Henry Dana, Jr., published in 1840, having been written after a two-year sea voyage starting in 1834. A film adaptation under the same name was released in 1946.

In the book, which takes place between 1834 and 1836, Dana gives a vivid account of "the life of a common sailor at sea as it really is". He sails from Boston to South America and around Cape Horn to California. Dana's ship was on a voyage to trade goods from the United States for the Mexican colonial Californian California missions' and ranchos' cow hides. They traded at the ports in San Diego Bay, San Pedro Bay, Santa Barbara Channel, Monterey Bay, and San Francisco Bay.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781304410221
  • Publisher: Lulu.com
  • Publication date: 9/9/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 762,135
  • File size: 5 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 151 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(47)

4 Star

(37)

3 Star

(25)

2 Star

(17)

1 Star

(25)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 165 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 22, 2010

    Excellent read - don't know how I missed it for all these years

    Dana writes an eminently readable first-person account of his experiences as a common sailor on a couple of commercial sailing vessels in the mid 19th century. The title references the convention that common sailors were housed in the forecastle of the ship (before the mast), while officers stayed aft. His account of the day-to-day life of a sailor, two crossings of Cape Horn, and the coast of pre-Gold Rush California are fascinating. If you want to gain a sense of the reality behind the romance of large sailing vessels, this is a must-read. His observations of his fellow sailors, officers, and the culture of California give real insight into life in the 1800's.
    Dana's final chapter is a thoughtful essay on the hardships of the sailor's life, with some surprising conclusions on what should and should not be done to improve their lot.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 9, 2011

    Great Stuff

    Forget Moby Dick, this is a real story of the sea! It has a remarkably contemparary feel to it and is told in a candid first person that never lags. Melvilles awful fantasy we all were forced to read blatantly rips off this fun, intimate and detailed American masterpiece. Anyone fascinated by the days of tall ships will love this intimate look behind the veil of life at sea.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2011

    Excellent Book

    This is one of the best books I've ever read. It is well written and it's history is amazing. If you're interested in the old "square rigger" sailing days and what it was like on one of these as crew this book will not let you down. It is also a great history book of California. Couldn't put it down.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Good for sailors

    This explains the old way to sail ships at sea. Having been in the U S Navy 22 years, I loved it and all the nautical terms being used. A sailors life was much different in the 1800's than it is today because of this book. If your not inerested in being at sea, then you'll find this book very boring. If you love the sea as I do, you'll enjoy it very much> I know I did.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2012

    What I Think

    I'm going on a ship on April 28-29. My teacher said I have to read it to see what life was really like in "the olden days." I think it is good so far. I'll have to finish the book to see and so will you! Calikid615

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 11, 2011

    The Original Sailing Tale

    This was the first realistic account of what it was like to be a sailor. The author does not spare the reader any of the details of the boat, using all of the terminology of the time. The parts when Dana describes the changes in the sails/rigging tend to lose me. The strongest parts are when Dana turns his observation on the territory of California.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2008

    A reviewer

    'All hands on deck!' shouted the captain's booming voiceas it echoed throughout the ship. The captain told us we had a hard day's work packed ahead of us. We were sailing around the bottom tip of South America, Cape Horn. We were in for a trecherous sail and boy we were so tired from the last four months at sea that we did not know how we'd get through this. The captain ordered all the sails to be put down and none of us wanted to do it. We knew we'd have to do what the captain said. This book is about a boy who is wealthy and he attends Harvard University. His eyes had been hurting him so he went to the doctor and the doctor said he needed a while at sea. He signed on the pilgrim. He did not know in 1835 how a sailor was treated. The captain is nice at first, but soon he sees how much power he has and whips some men. He does not regret signing on the Pilgrim, but it is not his favorite 'vacation' either. Read this book to find out what happens. The message is that to have money you need to work. Work is not always easy. If you live in a nice home and are wealthy maybe you should try living in the hard life. It is not always easy to not have a lot of money. This book was interesting because if I had not read it I would not have known how sailors work and make a living. I think readers who are up for adventure should read this book. Just get ready for scary things! This book is very good and I think you should sign aboard the Pilgrim and dive into this adventurous true book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2004

    Detailed, but exciting

    Dana's account of his travels around the Cape and along the coast of California paints an excellent portrait of the life of a 19th century seaman. Although the nautical terminology is at times difficult to follow, the story and characters are riveting. This is a classic among nautical tales.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2003

    A Classic Hit

    I thoroughly loved this book, and have passed it on to friends. My husband, who is a boat captain read it several times. One does not have to be involved with ship sailing to fall in love with this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 165 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)