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Typography, Referenced: A Comprehensive Visual Guide to the Language, History, and Practice of Typography
     

Typography, Referenced: A Comprehensive Visual Guide to the Language, History, and Practice of Typography

by Jason Tselentis, Allan Haley, Richard Poulin, Tony Seddon, Gerry Leonidas
 

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Typography, Referenced was named to the 2013 Outstanding Reference Sources List, an annual handpicked list from the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA, a division of the American Library Association) of the most noteworthy reference titles published in 2012.

Typography, Referenced is the single most comprehensive volume covering every

Overview

Typography, Referenced was named to the 2013 Outstanding Reference Sources List, an annual handpicked list from the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA, a division of the American Library Association) of the most noteworthy reference titles published in 2012.

Typography, Referenced is the single most comprehensive volume covering every aspect of typography that any design student, professional designer, or design aficionado needs to know today.

In these pages, you'll find:

—Thousands of illustrated examples of contemporary usage in design

—Historical developments from Greek lapidary letters to the movie Helvetica

—Landmark designs turning single letters into typefaces

—Definitions of essential type-specific language, terms, ideas, principles, and processes

—Ways technology has influenced and advanced type

—The future of type on the web, mobile devices, tablets, and beyond

In short, Typography, Referenced is the ultimate source of typographic information and inspiration, documenting and chronicling the full scope of essential typographic knowledge and design from the beginnings of moveable type to the present "golden age" of typography.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Typography Referenced is a beautifully illustrated and superbly designed compendium of typographic history, language, and practice. The authors, who are among the most respected typographers in the field, have produced a book that is both exhaustive and authoritative. Not quite a textbook and not quite a reference book, it is best suited for colleges with a graphic design or typography program. Since the chapters are written individually by the different authors, some differences in writing style are evident; nevertheless, when Allan Haley, Richard Poulin, and Gerry Leonidas are among the authors of a book about fonts and typography, readers will not be disappointed. These leading authorities in the field teach at several of the outstanding design education institutions in the world. The result is a book that will be fascinating for working practitioners, students, and people looking for answers to technical questions. Though not specifically a reference work, this volume will serve admirably in this role for anyone interested in the arcana of typography. Chapters on type classification, type history, foundries, fonts, type designers, terminology, and the various letterforms that make up alphabets are beautifully presented. The book ends with very useful appendixes that offer information on publications, organizations, schools, conferences, films, and museums devoted to typography. This valuable work will be helpful to readers for decades to come.” – R.M. Labuz, Mohawk Valley Community College

"The many authors who worked on this volume—Haley (ABC’s of Type), Richard Poulin (typography, Sch. of Visual Arts NY; The Language of Graphic Design), Jason Tselentis (Type Form and Function), Tony Seddon (Graphic Design for Non-Designers), Gerry Leonidas (typography, Univ. of Reading, UK), Ina Saltz (electronic design & multimedia, City Coll., CUNY), Kathryn Henderson (Online and on Paper), and Tyler Alterman—have created an attractive, informative book with an uncertain purpose. The introduction pitches the title as something between a reference and a book for casual perusal (likening it to Judy Jones and William Wilson’s An Incomplete Education). A later section, ostensibly on designing with type, provides plenty of color pictures of modern applications but little textual analysis, making this section like part of a coffee-table book. However, the overall breadth of material, both conceptual and practical—including information about existing typefaces and how to work with them—and a section at the end listing schools, periodicals, conferences, museums, and websites related to typography, make it suitable as a textbook for an introductory college class on typography. Unsurprisingly, the book is also well designed. VERDICT: This title is somewhat technical for average readers, and the number of authors leads to uneven writing. Still, high school seniors and college students beginning their path toward careers as graphic designers or commercial artists will find this guide invaluable." — Library Journal

Library Journal
The many authors who worked on this volume—Haley (ABC's of Type), Richard Poulin (typography, Sch. of Visual Arts NY; The Language of Graphic Design), Jason Tselentis (Type Form and Function), Tony Seddon (Graphic Design for Non-Designers), Gerry Leonidas (typography, Univ. of Reading, UK), Ina Saltz (electronic design & multimedia, City Coll., CUNY), Kathryn Henderson (Online and on Paper), and Tyler Alterman—have created an attractive, informative book with an uncertain purpose. The introduction pitches the title as something between a reference and a book for casual perusal (likening it to Judy Jones and William Wilson's An Incomplete Education). A later section, ostensibly on designing with type, provides plenty of color pictures of modern applications but little textual analysis, making this section like part of a coffee-table book. However, the overall breadth of material, both conceptual and practical—including information about existing typefaces and how to work with them—and a section at the end listing schools, periodicals, conferences, museums, and websites related to typography, make it suitable as a textbook for an introductory college class on typography. Unsurprisingly, the book is also well designed. VERDICT This title is somewhat technical for average readers, and the number of authors leads to uneven writing. Still, high school seniors and college students beginning their path toward careers as graphic designers or commercial artists will find this guide invaluable.—Robert Mixner, Bartholomew Cty. P.L., Columbus, IN

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781592537020
Publisher:
Rockport Publishers
Publication date:
02/01/2012
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
1,389,199
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.30(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Language of Letters

Typeface design, type design, or font design? Letter or glyph? Letterform, perhaps? Designers often use terms interchangeably, but it is helpful to have a good grasp of the nuances, if only because they reveal different aspects of the design process.

Think of a word. A sequence of letters should spring to mind. Write that sequence on a sheet of paper and these letters assume a concrete form made manually: They have been translated into letterforms. Any representations of letters made manually, regardless of the tool and the scale, are letterforms. Their maker controls their sequence and size and knows the dimensions and properties of the surface on which they are rendered. A hasty shopping list, Trajan’s column, John Downer’s brush-made signs. They’re all meaningful collections of letterforms.

On the other hand, any representation of letters intended for mechanical reproduction is a collection of typeforms. The sequence in which a user places them and the size he or she will use remains unknown at the time of their making. Their maker also cannot predict the specifics of their rendering environment. Crucially, typeforms represent formal relationships in two dimensions rather than a specific way of capturing and rendering a shape. In other words, a Univers lowercase a is a Univers lowercase a regardless of the type-making and typesetting technology. Although there are differences in the visible forms produced with handset, hot-metal, and digital type, for example, the differences reflect the influence of the encoding and rendering technology. In other words, a typeface is a snapshot of the designer’s intentions for a collection of typeforms.

To use these shapes in a specific typesetting environment, the typeforms get converted into glyphs (the term for digital formats), precise encodings in a machine-readable language enriched with information about the space surrounding the shape, its relationship to other glyphs, and its behavior. This machine-specific implementation of a typeface is called a font. To return to our Univers example, the typeface can be represented by a Linotype matrix or bits in an OpenType font, but the essence of the design survives, hopefully with fidelity to the designer’s intentions. Typeface design and font making are nominally sequential processes, even if design today closely interweaves typeface design and font production. One person may embody both roles, but often the typeface designer and font maker are separate members of the same team.

Meet the Author

Jason Tselentis teaches graphic design and typography at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, South Carolina. He is the author of Type, Form, and Function by Rockport Publishers.

Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging, based in Woburn, Massachusetts. He is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs, and editorial content for the company's type libraries and websites.

Richard Poulin is cofounder, design director, and a principal of Poulin + Morris Inc. (http://www.poulinmorris.com), an internationally recognized, multidisciplinary design consultancy located in New York City. His work has been recognized by major design organizations, competitions, and publications including the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA), Communication Arts, Graphis, Library of Congress, Type Director Club, and the New York Art Directors Club. Richard is a Fellow of the Society for Environmental Graphic Design, the organization's highest honor, and is a past President and board member of the New York Chapter of AIGA.Tony Seddon’s longstanding career as a graphic designer has taken him from his native Cornwall, via London and several publishing companies, to East Sussex where he now works as a freelance designer and writer. He has authored and co-authored multiple books, including Graphic Design for Non-designers; Art Directing Projects for Print; and Thou Shall Not Use Comic Sans. Visit him online at http://www.tonyseddon.com.

Gerry Leonidas is a Senior Lecturer in Typography at the University of Reading, UK. He teaches typographic design and typeface design at under- and postgraduate levels.Ina Saltz is an art director, designer, and author of numerous articles on design and typography. She is the author of Typography Essentials by Rockport Publishers. She lives in New York City.Kathryn Henderson is a writer, editor, and designer interested in the convergence between design and pop culture. Currently, you can find her at Pentagram Design obsessing over new design work and assisting with daily communications as deputy editor of Content Development for http://www.pentagram.com.

Ina Saltz is an art director, designer, writer, photographer and professor (of Electronic Design and Multimedia at The City College of New York) whose areas of expertise are typography and magazine design. For over 22 years, Ina was an editorial design director at Time Magazine (International Editions), Worth Magazine, and other magazines including Golf Magazine, Golf for Women Magazine, and Worldbusiness Magazine. Ina frequently lectures on topics related to magazine design and typography, including Toronto, Atlanta, Denver, Moscow, Amsterdam and Calgary.

Kathryn Henderson is a writer, editor, and designer interested in the convergence between design and pop culture. Currently, you can find her at Pentagram Design obsessing over new design work and assisting with daily communications as deputy editor of Content Development for http://www.pentagram.com. She resides in Brooklyn, NY.

Tyler Alterman is a fourth-year student in The City University of New York's Macaulay Honors College studying creative behavior change. His obsessions include the science of persuasion, cognitive neuroscience, graphic design, cinnamon pita chips, and any fine type with high contrast, ball terminals, or geometric forms. He lives in New York City.

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