Tyrannosaurus Math

Tyrannosaurus Math

2.0 1
by Michelle Markel, Doug Cushman
     
 

Who can add an entire herd of triceratops, multiply the legs of a group of ankylosaurs, and estimate the distance to the next tasty meal?

TYRANNOSAURUS MATH!

He's a number-crunching dinosaur who chews on math problems as easily as he thunders through the trees. When his little sister is in terrible danger, T-Math even saves the day by using his

Overview

Who can add an entire herd of triceratops, multiply the legs of a group of ankylosaurs, and estimate the distance to the next tasty meal?

TYRANNOSAURUS MATH!

He's a number-crunching dinosaur who chews on math problems as easily as he thunders through the trees. When his little sister is in terrible danger, T-Math even saves the day by using his measurable math skills. Is there anything he can't figure?

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Markel’s engaging story has just the right blend of math concepts, dinosaur info, and silly humor, and Cushman’s textured acrylics reinforce the math and add to the amusement factor. A final page describes the different math skills applied throughout the book.—The Horn Book Review
Children's Literature - Vicki Foote
A dinosaur just hatched from an egg begins counting his claws and fingers. His mother names him Tyrannosaurus Math, and tells him to "Go figure." The counting begins as he counts the members of his family and then begins to count by twos, fives, and tens. Little episodes in his daily life have him adding and subtracting three digit numbers. He multiplies to count his teeth, and draws a picture to determine how many legs he would eat if he ate three ankylosaurs. He makes pictographs and even uses estimation to figure out how to rescue his sister. Finally, he and his family try to count the stars and end up using estimation. It all ends in a group hug and how they lived "mathematically ever after." The illustrations of the dinosaurs are large and colorful and the illustrations of the math concepts are simple and easy to understand. There is a pronunciation guide, and a page listing math terms and their meanings. The book is an entertaining overview of some math concepts and gives an amusing new perspective to math vocabulary. Reviewer: Vicki Foote
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—From the moment Tyrannosaurus Math (T-Math for short) is hatched, he views the world in mathematical terms. He begins with simple addition (how many siblings have also hatched) and proceeds through such skills as grouping (counting a herd of triceratops, though he's not yet old enough to consume them), ordering and comparing (who ate the most dragonflies), and geometric shapes (is that meteor a sphere or a cube?). In all, 15 concepts are demonstrated with clear, logical, and amusing examples. The skills are also identified and explained at the back of the book. Markel never misses an opportunity to weave math into the lively text: "At his full size, nothing was scarier than the sight of T-Math thundering through the forest, chewing on a problem in his head." Cushman's acrylic cartoons, with their clean lines and vibrant colors, add considerably to readers' enjoyment. The artwork clearly illustrates the math problems while gleefully depicting the dinosaurs. This is a clever addition to the growing number of books that make a sometimes daunting subject both more understandable and just plain fun.—Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ
Kirkus Reviews
T-Math's enthusiasm for numbers and solutions to real-world problems makes this a title that math teachers can sink their teeth into. From the moment he bursts out of his shell, T-Math thinks mathematically, making number sentences to express how many digits he has and the number of kids in his family. He counts footprints by twos and uses fives and tens to group and count a herd of triceratops. He checks his subtraction with addition, draws pictures to solve word problems, creates pictographs and thinks in pie graphs. And it is his estimation skills that save his sister, who gets stranded on the wrong side of a canyon after an earthquake. From that day on the entire family appreciated his love for math and learned all they could from him. Backmatter provides an index of the different skills T-Math uses. Cushman's brightly colored acrylic illustrations nicely show readers the math involved without diminishing in any way the personalities of the dinosaurs. The ultimate melding of a topic kids love with knowledge they need. (Picture book. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582462820
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
07/14/2009
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,161,982
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Read an Excerpt

One muggy morning, a dinosaur burst from his shell.

"My, what big claws I have!" he marveled, as he counted his fingers. "And what big toes I've got!" He counted those too. Then he added his fingers and toes together, making a number sentence.

"Go figure!" his mother cried, and she named him Tyrannosaurus Math.

4+6=10

Crack! Crack! Out popped two tyrannosaurus brothers.
Crack! Crack! Crack! Out popped three tyrannosaurus sisters.
"Hmm, that's me, plus two, plus three," he thought, and reckoned how many kids were in his family.

1+2+3=6

Meet the Author

TYRANNOSAURUS MATH, a close relative of Tyrannosaurus rex, lived in the late Cretaceous Period, 65 to 68 million years ago, in Western North America. He and his siblings were eleven to fourteen feet tall, weighed five to seven tons, had two-and-a-half foot long arms, two-and-a-half foot long feet, and teeth that were ten inches long!

MICHELLE MARKEL, the author of five children's books, has also written for national newspapers and taught in elementary schools. Tyrannosaurus Math grew out of an experience in the classroom: "One day I was teaching math to second graders. Knowing how kids loathe word problems, I invented some of my own, using dinosaurs. The kids loved them." The rest is prehistory. Michelle lives near Los Angeles.

DOUG CUSHMAN, a Northern Californian now living in Paris, has written and/or illustrated more than one hundred children's books. In high school, Doug created comic books lampooning his teachers, and he sold them to classmates for five cents a piece.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Tyrannosaurus Math 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
JGCmom More than 1 year ago
I thought this book would teach more but it is really light on the math concepts and my children really did not get anything out of it, other than a dinosaur.