The Tyranny of Printers: Newspaper Politics in the Early American Republic [NOOK Book]

Overview

Although frequently attacked for their partisanship and undue political influence, the American media of today are objective and relatively ineffectual compared to their counterparts of two hundred years ago. From the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century, newspapers were the republic's central political institutions, working components of the party system rather than commentators on it.

The Tyranny of Printers narrates the rise of this newspaper-based politics, in ...

See more details below
The Tyranny of Printers: Newspaper Politics in the Early American Republic

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - first paperback printing)
$22.99
BN.com price
(Save 38%)$37.50 List Price

Overview

Although frequently attacked for their partisanship and undue political influence, the American media of today are objective and relatively ineffectual compared to their counterparts of two hundred years ago. From the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century, newspapers were the republic's central political institutions, working components of the party system rather than commentators on it.

The Tyranny of Printers narrates the rise of this newspaper-based politics, in which editors became the chief party spokesmen and newspaper offices often served as local party headquarters. Beginning when Thomas Jefferson enlisted a Philadelphia editor to carry out his battle with Alexander Hamilton for the soul of the new republic (and got caught trying to cover it up), the centrality of newspapers in political life gained momentum after Jefferson's victory in 1800, which was widely credited to a superior network of papers. Jeffrey L. Pasley tells the rich story of this political culture and its culmination in Jacksonian democracy, enlivening his narrative with accounts of the colorful but often tragic careers of individual editors.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Washington Post Book World
"Provocative account of the central role of newspapers in . . . the American republic through the late 19th century."
July 15, 2001
Robert A. Gross
"By far the best book I've seen on the role of newspapers in the making of democracy in America from the Revolution to the age of Jackson. Pasley brings to life a host of obscure but fascinating figures--the party 'hacks' through whose labors Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe ousted the Federalists from power and set America on a democratic course. Pasley sets forward their efforts in engaging narrative, rich in vignettes of leading editors, full of lively anecdotes, ever attentive to the larger implications of the story."
College of William and Mary
Thomas C. Leonard
"The Tyranny of Printers will be the book every serious person will consult before they generalize about journalists in the age of Jefferson."
University of California, Berkeley
Booknews
A former reporter for , Pasley (history, U. of Missouri-Columbia) explores how and by whom the merger between the news media and US political parties was forged in the late 18th century. He says that partnership dominated politics in the country until the 1920 election, when it ended permanently. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813921891
  • Publisher: University of Virginia Press
  • Publication date: 11/29/2002
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: first paperback printing
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Jeffrey L. Pasley, a former staff writer for the New Republic, is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Missouri.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
A Note on Conventions and Methods
1 The Newspaper-Based Political System of the Nineteenth-Century United States 1
2 The Printing Trade in Early American Politics 24
3 The Two National Gazettes and the Beginnings of Newspaper Politics 48
4 Benjamin Franklin Bache and the Price of Partisanship 79
5 The Background and Failure of the Sedition Act 105
6 Charles Holt's Generation: From Commercial Printers to Political Professionals 132
7 The Expansion of the Republican Newspaper Network, 1798-1800 153
8 A Presence in the Public Sphere: William Duane and the Triumph of Newspaper Politics 176
9 The New Conventional Wisdom: Consolidating and Expanding a Newspaper-Based Political System 196
10 The Federalists Strike Back 229
11 Improving on the Sedition Act: Press Freedom and Political Culture after 1800 258
12 The "Tyranny of Printers" in Jeffersonian Philadelphia 285
13 Ordinary Editors and Everyday Politics: How the System Worked 320
14 Newspaper Editors and the Reconstruction of Party Politics 348
App. 1 Charts on the Growth of the American Press 401
App. 2 The Sedition Act and the Expansion of the Republican Press 407
Notes 411
Selected Bibliography 467
Index 499
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)