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Uh-Oh!
     

Uh-Oh!

by Mary Newell DePalma
 

Using bright and comical watercolor paintings, this nearly wordless book tells the story of a hapless little dinosaur’s disastrous day. Children will be amused as they follow the endearing main character from one scrape right into another.

Overview

Using bright and comical watercolor paintings, this nearly wordless book tells the story of a hapless little dinosaur’s disastrous day. Children will be amused as they follow the endearing main character from one scrape right into another.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"If young kids haven't already learned to exclaim 'Uh-oh' over some mishap, it's guaranteed they will after reading this entertaining romp.
"The action begins even before the title page, when a young dinosaur kicks a couch pillow. In slow motion, it crashes into the building blocks of his siblings, and a series of childhood accidents ensues. He jumps onto a flowerpot that spills; gets a broom to sweep it up but knocks over a gallon of milk; uses a throw rug to mop up the floor; puts the rug in the dishwasher to clean it. Of course, he oversoaps the machine and bubbles erupt, dishes are broken, water floods the floor so high that he grabs onto a broken shelf and floats out the window. He picks up the pieces and returns to the kitchen, where his parents are mopping up. As punishment, he is sent to sit in the corner. But — 'uh-oh' — he finds a stick of gum under the rug, and you guessed it, bubble gum has him covered in the pink, sticky stuff. Since the term 'uh-oh,' which is virtually the only text, appears only seven times, the humor relies on the lively watercolor illustrations to create the visual narrative. They comically animate each episode almost like cartoon strips."
—Kirkus Reviews
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
"Uh-oh!" is almost the only text in this story, repeated as an adventurous young dragon inadvertently causes a series of mishaps, to the consternation of his irritated parents. He leaps, knocking down blocks, and then spilling the dirt from a potted plant. Sweeping up, he hits the milk jug off the table with the back of the broom handle. Problems escalate, as he tries to clean that up, messes a rug, puts it in the dishwasher to wash, and lets out an "Ahhhh!" ignoring the warning about overfilling the soap dish on the machine. Things get worse as he is washed away in the overflow of suds from the dishwasher. He sails out the window with the flood and returns to face his furious family. Sitting in the time-out chair in the corner, he finds some bubble gum underneath. A final, "Uh-oh" accompanies the expected disaster. The events are depicted in a variety of framed and unframed watercolor vignettes plus a couple of double-page spreads to encompass the action and the worst messes. Readers will be amused but also empathize with the well-meaning but very unlucky hero. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—A young dinosaur gets himself into all kinds of trouble in this clever, nearly wordless book. The little terror is jumping on the couch, which leads to knocking over his siblings' blocks and a plant. This begins a chain of events that culminates in an overflowing dishwasher washing the youngster out the window. He reenters, wet and muddy, and ends up in a time-out chair. But it isn't over yet, for there is a stash of bubble gum under the corner of the rug. The only text is a series of "Uh-oh's" punctuating each disaster, one "Ahhhh!" and a close-up on the dishwasher detergent box reading "warning: do not overfill soapdish." The story takes place in the pictures, where the beguiling creature moves through the pages, interspersed with almost comic-book-style panels, showing the stages of each of the mishaps as they unfold. The dinosaurs are green, with blue spikes on their backs and beige bellies, and walk upright on two feet. Their round, half-lidded eyes have a tendency to pop during trouble. The setting is a brightly colored human-style house, complete with all the trappings. The plot is humorously appealing, if deceptively sophisticated. Despite the lack of text, it is likely to appeal most to older preschoolers and early elementary children who will understand the humor.—Amy Lilien-Harper, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT
Kirkus Reviews
If young kids haven't already learned to exclaim "Uh-oh" over some mishap, it's guaranteed they will after reading this entertaining romp.

The action begins even before the title page, when a young dinosaur kicks a couch pillow. In slow motion, it crashes into the building blocks of his siblings, and a series of childhood accidents ensues. He jumps onto a flowerpot that spills; gets a broom to sweep it up but knocks over a gallon of milk; uses a throw rug to mop up the floor; puts the rug in the dishwasher to clean it. Of course, he oversoaps the machine and bubbles erupt, dishes are broken, water floods the floor so high that he grabs onto a broken shelf and floats out the window. He picks up the pieces and returns to the kitchen, where his parents are mopping up. As punishment, he is sent to sit in the corner. But—"uh-oh"—he finds a stick of gum under the rug, and you guessed it, bubble gum has him covered in the pink, sticky stuff. Since the term "uh-oh," which is virtually the only text, appears only seven times, the humor relies on the lively watercolor illustrations to create the visual narrative. They comically animate each episode almost like cartoon strips.

Other books with the same title are available—be sure to get this one too, with the impish, blue-spiked dinosaur, for bubbling good fun.(Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802853721
Publisher:
Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
Publication date:
05/27/2011
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Mary Newell DePalma has written and illustrated severalbooks for children, including The Strange Egg(Houghton Mifflin) and A Grand Old Tree(Scholastic), which received the IRA/CBC Children's Choiceaward. She has also illustrated several books for Eerdmans:Swimming Sal, Now It Is Winter, and Now It Is Summer. Mary lives in Massachusetts. Visit her website at www.marynewelldepalma.com.

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