Ukulele: The World's Friendliest Instrument
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Ukulele: The World's Friendliest Instrument

by Daniel Dixon, Jayne McKay
     
 

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These days the ukulele is experiencing a revolution-both as a valid instrument that can sweetly transform pop music and rock and roll, and as the focus of dozens of clubs springing up across the world. Ukulele! brings the "uke" world to light, exposing its colorful history, quirky characters, and irresistible charm. Dozens of colorful photos and ephemera make

Overview

These days the ukulele is experiencing a revolution-both as a valid instrument that can sweetly transform pop music and rock and roll, and as the focus of dozens of clubs springing up across the world. Ukulele! brings the "uke" world to light, exposing its colorful history, quirky characters, and irresistible charm. Dozens of colorful photos and ephemera make Ukulele! as fun to look at as it is to read.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423603696
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
03/01/2011
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
1,266,708
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
11 Years

Read an Excerpt

Of all the American ukists who were destined for stardom, Cliff Edwards probably tops the list. He was born in Mark Twain’s hometown of Hannibal, Missouri, and was out on his own before he started to shave. A jaunty man with the huge dark eyes of a raccoon and a sweet pure voice that could span three octaves, he made his way to St. Louis, where he laboriously taught himself to play the uke. Like most of his uke-playing contemporaries, he found himself wanting an easy-to-carry, easy-to-play instrument to tote around to bars (which might or might not have had a piano and accompanist). For a struggling performer, the uke was an inexpensive, accessible choice. Edwards sang in saloons for nickels and dimes, and there he picked up the nickname “Ukulele Ike.” For the next couple of years, he toured with various carnivals and tent shows, just barely managing to get by.

Meet the Author

Daniel Dixon wrote for such magazines as Life, Cosmopolitan, Esquire and House & Garden. He authored The Thunderbird Remembered, a memoir of his father, Maynard Dixon.

Jayne McKay is a documentary filmaker with a focus on art and artists. Her first film is Maynard Dixon Art and Spirit. She lives in Los Angeles.

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